Modern Luxury Acquires Aspen Magazine

first_imgIt was Modern Luxury who approached the publication, which has been around for almost 40 years and joins the company’s existing 40 regional titles. Janet O’Grady, the brand’s previous owner, will remain editor-in-chief of Aspen Magazine and continue to direct the publication’s editorial focus.When it comes to growth, Dickey says that Aspen will look to its other titles in Los Angeles, New York, Dallas or Houston, among others, to capitalize on the synergy between the demographics. According to Kim Mac Leod, president of Regional Media Advisors, who was not involved in this deal, the very nature of Aspen as a location and a publication presents a great opportunity for Modern Luxury.“This make sense for them because it’s the same kind of audience that they’re going for,” she says. “These magazines sell advertising across their various titles—that’s the business model, to leverage multiple circulations and aggregate circulation to sell larger advertisers that want to target the same kind of audiences and have retail establishments or brands in all of the disparate areas. It’s quite possible that if you did a demographic snapshot of Aspen residents, my guess is that this is a second home for them, so it’s quite possible that Modern Luxury believes the same audience and the same mindset will be there, who will then go back to their primary city and also look for that brand.”Besides growing the brand’s stature among its existing audiences, Dickey says that over the next two-to-three weeks the company will begin rolling out Aspen Magazine on to tablets in an effort to grow its digital presence.In addition to O’Grady, all of Aspen Magazine’s staff is expected to be maintained, and its parent company will look to fill the open positions of publisher and managing editor. According to a spokesperson for Aspen Magazine, the title has a paid circulation of 5,000, though 30,000 copies are usually printed for distribution of this 7x publication.Outside of this acquisition, Modern Luxury is setting its site on continuous growth.“In the summer of 2013 we’ll also be going into the Hamptons—we allow the brands to show us where they need Modern Luxury, whether it’s a Seattle, a Boston or a Philadelphia, whatever the case may be. Where there’s a need, that’s where we look first.”Stay updated on the latest FOLIO: news, become a Facebook fan and follow us on Twitter! Affluent lifestyle publisher Modern Luxury is closing a hole in its portfolio with the acquisition of Aspen Magazine—a market the CEO says will help propel the company’s growth.“Aspen is a premiere luxury market and our company didn’t have a presence there,” says Michael Dickey, CEO of Modern Luxury. “Our plan was to enter the market here in 2013, but then the opportunity came upon us to purchase Aspen Magazine and it was a great fit.”Dickey declined to offer terms of the sale.last_img read more

Facebook doesnt waste time it wastes attention spans Thats worse

first_img 6 NurPhoto It’s a chilly winter night in Munich, Germany. I’m alone in an empty hostel dorm, basking in the warmth of the heater and the hostel’s surprising hygiene, trying to watch Mad Men on my MacBook.I say “trying” because this is proving to be a peculiarly difficult task. Watching 50-minute episodes of Mad Men is taking anywhere between one and a half to two hours because I keep getting distracted.I’ll just check Facebook. Maybe someone from home has messaged me. I should take a look at Twitter — oh, I forgot, Twitter is awful. You know what, I’m going to Instagram-stalk the hippie I met in Serbia. Ah, that’s right, I forgot to reply to that Facebook message from the other day. Some variation of these thoughts creeps into my brain every few minutes, glacializing my Mad Men progress. How will Don Draper’s story end? I suspect I’ll never know. Tags 5:14 This was four months ago. I left Australia last August for a solo backpacking trip through Europe. Yeah, meeting people and seeing the world is cool, but I also wanted to use this trip to catch up on random shows, books and movies I could never get around to in my real life. I figured I’d have almost unlimited time, so it would be easy. It turns out that unlimited time means little when paired with a limited attention span.Personal discontent about Facebook, Instagram and Twitter use is so common it’s almost redundant. If you tell someone you’re quitting Instagram or trying to use Facebook less, the odds are high that said person will reply with “Oh, wow, I really need to do that too.”Some of this is empty posturing, like the pageantry of saying you want to eat fewer carbs even though you already know there’s no quitting your 11 p.m. cheese toastie habit. (Me. I’m talking about me now.) But the widespread understanding that social media use is a waste of time is telling.1-bu77rat955qeo0xal45c5qOh, Don. Whatever will become of you? AMC Like everyone else on the planet, I often complain that there aren’t enough hours in a day. There are so many books to read, games to play and TV shows to Netflix, but how can I be expected to do that amid the daily grind of work, commuting, attempting to exercise, keeping up with family and friends, and, y’know, sleep.To this end, I used to think of social media as a waste of precious time. An hour spent on Facebook and Instagram is an hour I could have spent reading, mirin’ Don Draper, learning a language or otherwise being productive. But that’s not quite accurate.When I jetted to Europe, I was jetting away from all my responsibilities — and was shocked by how little difference this made. Because, for me at least, the problem isn’t 15-minute blocks of time lost to social media. It’s the 10-second gaps that social media fill that make it impossible to concentrate on anything for a sustained period of time, protracting even simple tasks.The trouble is when the cheeky Instagram check-in goes from filling the 10-second wait for the green man at traffic lights to the 5-second lull in a TV show. Then, minutes later, you realize nothing makes sense because you actually haven’t been paying attention. It also obviously bleeds into work. If a page is loading, I would find myself opening a Twitter tab even though the original page would have loaded in literally a second. Given studies have shown it can take over 20 minutes to get your mind back to the task at hand once distracted, this can be a productivity disaster. Maybe even a bigger problem than not being able to enjoy the latest quality television productions from AMC.boompromoClick for more Boom With a View. I’d noted how poor my attention span was earlier in the trip, but Mad Men was my attentive nadir. Something had to change. Growing up, my parents told me watching TV would ruin my attention span. Now I can’t even concentrate on TV long enough for it to ruin my attention span. I deactivated my Twitter account the next day, with Instagram following soon after. (Now, four months later, Twitter has been reactivated but used much less frequently.) Facebook’s app has been deleted off my phone, and is a laptop-only activity.After the social media purge, I didn’t miss lying in bed and scrolling through Instagram. I did, however, yearn for these apps in situations where there’s no option to do anything else. Time spent waiting in line for coffee or on the 5-minute bus to the train station aren’t substantial enough for me to be doing anything productive, for instance, so scrolling Twitter isn’t so dangerous. (Except it is because, as mentioned, Twitter is awful.)People freaked out last Wednesday when Facebook and Instagram were down. The outage led many users to Twitter, a real oven-to-the-frying-pan situation. Some users went into panic mode. I call it a good start. If you struggled during the outage, look at it as a challenge. You already went 12 hours without Facebook and Instagram, see if you can make it longer. See how you feel after seven days. And for the record, I still have six seasons of Mad Men to go.  Comments Share your voicecenter_img Facebook Instagram Facebook, Instagram, Twitter: What’s your relationship… Mobile Culture Boom With a View Now playing: Watch this:last_img read more

Feet may be the key to hand evolution

first_imgImage: Wikimedia Commons. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In research reported in the journal Evolution, a team of scientists, led by Campbell Rolian from the University of Calgary, took extensive measurements of the feet and hands of chimpanzees (genetically, our closest relatives) and humans to try to find out how the extremities of our chimp-like ancestors might have evolved. They found there was a definite correlation between measurements of similar areas of the foot and hand, so for example if the big toe was long, the finger was also long. Dr Rolian speculated the correlation between toes and fingers may be because they share a similar genetic “blueprint”, so minor changes to the blueprint would affect both hands and feet.Once they had the anatomical measurements, the team used the data to create a mathematical simulation of the evolution of the hands and feet from those of our chimp-like ancestors to humans. The model simulated the evolutionary pressures and changed the shape of the feet or hands in small increments to see what effects the changes would have. They discovered that changes made to the feet also caused corresponding changes to the hands, particularly in the relative lengths of fingers and toes, and Dr Rolian said these changes may have allowed the hands of early hominins, including Neanderthals, the dexterity required to use stone tools.The scientists say the capacity to walk upright on two feet is linked intrinsically to the emergence of the use of stone tools. Dr Rolian said the findings go “back to Darwin’s The Descent of Man,” since Darwin was one of the first scientists to consider there might be a link between walking upright and using stone tools. But Darwin’s idea was that bipedalism evolved first, and this freed the hands, which could then be used for purposes other than locomotion, while Rolian’s work suggests they evolved together.Professor Robin Crompton at Liverpool University in the UK, said the feet and hands of chimpanzees may not necessarily be good models for those of human ancestors, and suggested the extremities of lowland gorillas may be more “interesting” in this respect. He also said the shape and biomechanics of hands and feet were more complex than simple anatomical measurements might suggest.Professor Crompton is head of the university’s Primate Evolution and Morphology Research Group. His research has found that orang-utans, which are tree dwellers, are more like modern humans in bipedal walking than the chimpanzees, and his work suggests bipedalism may even have arisen as early as 24 million years ago. © 2010 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — Scientists in Canada have used a mathematical model to simulate the evolution from an ape-like hand to the modern-day human hand, and discovered that changes in our fingers and hands developed in parallel changes in our toes and feet. Explore further Citation: Feet may be the key to hand evolution (2010, January 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-01-feet-key-evolution.html More information: THE CO-EVOLUTION OF HUMAN HANDS AND FEET, Evolution, DOI:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00944.x Early human ancestors had a wobble in their walklast_img read more

Queen of Ndebele music enchants

first_imgThe colours and sounds of Africa came alive here last week through the mesmerising music of Peki Emelia Nothembia Mkhwebane, known as the African queen of Ndebele music.The Ndebele musical tradition derives from the culture of the ethnic Zulu people of South Africa.Makhwebane enthralled a near-full house at the FICCI auditorium Saturday evening on the final day of the Days of South Africa in India festival, organised jointly by the Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR) and South Africa’s Department of Art and Culture. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’To repeated cries of encore, Mkhwenabe and her band gave a spectacular performance combining music and song with an energetic, spellbinding dance. She led the performance with her high pitched, soulful voice and electric guitar while the dancers entranced with their traditional costumes, coloured in vivid hues with intricate bead and metalwork.With songs like Angekhe Angijhiye (Jesus is great, will always be with me) and Igama (I have worked for my name), all sung in Ndebele with backup vocals, the performance was a vivid demonstration of how South African music is a dialogue with various forms and their hybridisation. ‘My music takes from both rural and urban traditions,’ Mkhwebane, who composes her songs, said. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix‘Music is a vital part of everyday life in Africa. It is always there in religious ceremonies, festivals, and social rituals. Everyone plays an active part in the musical life of the community,’ she said.For someone who has taken Ndebele culture to the world, Mkhwebane’s life mirrors the history of multicultural South Africa. Orphaned at the age of five, and unable to have a formal education, she learnt to play the reed flute from her grandmother and the guitar from her uncle.Mkhwebane has travelled extensively abroad, performing in the United States, Europe and Australia. She has many awards to her credit. These include the Tourism Ambassador for South Africa, the South African Music Award and more.last_img read more

Man Utd sink Arsenal to make topfour return

first_imgRooney’s strike added to a comedy own-goal by Kieran Gibbs that saw the left-back deflect Antonio Valencia’s cross into his own net after a mix-up with goalkeeper Wojciech Szczesny, who was injured in the process. Olivier Giroud, on as a second-half substitute, replied deep into stoppage time for Arsenal, but United held on to record a first competitive away win since April 5. The victory took Louis van Gaal’s side back into the Champions League places, 13 points behind leaders Chelsea. Also Read – Khel Ratna for Deepa and Bajrang, Arjuna for JadejaArsenal manager Arsene Wenger was left to rue an afternoon of wasted opportunities and inspired goalkeeping by United’s David de Gea, as well as injuries to Szczesny and Jack Wilshere.Arsenal produced a lightning start at the Emirates and should have been out of sight in th e first quarter of the match. Ex-United striker Danny Welbeck was presented with a sight of goal after Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain had been allowed to run in-field, but he was denied by Paddy McNair.United took the lead in the 56th minute in comical fashion. Szczesny clattered Gibbs as he came for Young’s deep cross and when Valencia smashed the rebound back into the area, Arsenal’s left-back diverted the ball into his own net. Arsenal pushed for a leveller, but they were undone on the counter-attack as Di Maria supplied Rooney, who raced clear and chipped the ball over Martinez in the second half.last_img read more

Overcapacity concerns downward pressure on fares No worries say Carnival Corp RCCL

first_img<< Previous PostNext Post >> Posted by This story originally ran in the Oct. 4, 2018 issue of Travelweek magazine. To get Travelweek delivered to your agency for free, subscribe here.TORONTO — Cruise companies have finally realized that it’s just as important, if not more so, to keep your travel agent partners onside as it is to build up and market your own call centre and direct booking channels.The relationship hasn’t been without its ups and downs but for the most part cruise lines have been a steadfast partner for the trade.It’s at the point where cruise bookings are such a core product for so many agencies that success (or lack of it) for the cruise industry can make or break travel agencies heavily invested in cruise sales.When cruise companies falter, travel agents feel it.While cruise fares have dipped slightly for the world’s biggest cruise company, Carnival Corporation & plc President and CEO Arnold Donald says there’s no cause for concern.Carnival Corp. recently posted its highest-ever quarterly performance, and that’s saying something, considering the cruise giant has been on a tear for the past few years with increasingly strong results.With 10 cruise line brands, and 11.5 million passengers a year – that’s half the entire global cruise market – Carnival Corp. and its ships cut a sizeable wake. Cruise lines including Carnival Corp., especially with its core brand Carnival Cruise Line, have been working hard in recent years to maintain price integrity and keep yields up, and to make bargain-basement cruise fares a thing of the past.Starting in June Carnival Corporation’s booking volumes for the first half of 2019 were running significantly higher than the prior year, at lower prices.But more recently, during the first half of September, booking volumes for the first half of next year were still running higher than last year and at higher prices too.Based on these booking trends, Carnival Corp. says it expects continued improvement when it comes to net revenue yields for the first half of 2019.More news:  Carnival Cruise Line enhances HUB app for families and youthGross revenue yields were up 4% in Q3. Net income for the company clocked in at US$1.7 billion, up from $1.3 billion. Revenues for the third quarter of 2018 were $5.8 billion, up from $5.5 billion.High fuel costs are an ongoing concern and Carnival, like every other company keeping an eye on fuel prices, has warned that climbing costs will put a dent in its Q4 results. Carnival Corp.’s Q3 2018 fuel bill was $434 million, up from $307 million in Q3 2017.For now at least, strong execution is overcoming fuel (and currency) headwinds, says Donald.Carnival and other cruise companies have been known to levy fuel surcharges, but so far haven’t resorted to this unpopular measure despite escalating fuel bills.Royal Caribbean Chairman and CEO Richard Fain acknowledges that rising fuel costs are a concern for Royal Caribbean too – RCCL hedges about 50% of its fuel needs. While keeping an eye on fuel costs, RCCL, parent company of Royal Caribbean, is going full steam ahead with its $1 billion investment to upgrade RCI ships, transform private island CocoCay in the Bahamas and attract more Millennials.Just like Carnival Corp., Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines is raking in the dollars, with revenues of US$2.3 billion for Q2.In an interview with CNBC, Fain said new ships like Royal Caribbean’s Symphony of the Seas, heading into its first full year of sailing in 2019, and the much anticipated and soon to be launched Celebrity Edge with its cantilevered floating platform, have created a lot of good momentum “and that’s carrying us nicely into 2019.”“We’re constantly improving our ships. New features attract more customers, they pay more, and that gives us the money to build and enhance our ships,” says Fain.RCCL, already with several brands under its belt including Royal Caribbean International, Celebrity Cruises and Azamara, is now even bigger with its majority stake purchase of luxury line Silversea Cruises this summer, with three new ships on the way.More news:  Onex paying big to get WestJet and that will send airfares soaring, says CWTMeanwhile Carnival Corp.’s capacity increases come with concerns about too many berths driving down prices and yields but Donald says there’s no cause for alarm.Carnival Corp. is spreading its capacity growth over a number of its brands and geographical regions “and we’re careful when and where we add capacity,” says Donald. Any over-concentration of capacity in individual markets will be temporary, he adds, and alleviated by new demand from the undersaturated cruise market.He adds: “We’re working aggressively to grow demand for our brands which will allow us to continue to fill our ships at increasingly attractive rates, while still providing a better value to the equivalent land-based alternative.”And while he first attributes Carnival Corp.’s performance to the Carnival Corp. team, he doesn’t forget the cruise company’s other, equally important team: travel agents. The record-breaking Q3 results, he says, “are a testament to the tens of thousands of travel professionals who so enthusiastically support our brand.” Overcapacity concerns, downward pressure on fares? No worries, say Carnival Corp., RCCL Kathryn Folliott Friday, October 12, 2018 Tags: Carnival Corporation, Carnival Cruise Line Share About Latest Posts Kathryn FolliottEditor at TravelweekKathryn is Editor at Travelweek and has worked for the company since 1995. She has travelled to more than 50 countries and counts Hong Kong, Jerusalem, the Swiss Alps and the Galapagos Islands among her favourite destinations. Latest posts by Kathryn Folliott (see all) “They need to go where the bucks are”: Agents on ACTA partnership – April 18, 2019 As the cost of doing business climbs, host agencies, retail groups say they have options – April 4, 2019 As of 2021 Europe-bound clients will need to apply online for a visa waiver and pay a fee – April 3, 2019last_img read more