A Vigil Against Hate

first_imgRED BANK — It was planned in a rush last Saturday evening as events were continuing in real time, with the vigil for peace becoming a near-spontaneous outpouring of passion, voicing opposition and anecdotes to the day’s violence.The hastily convened vigil conducted on Aug. 12 at Riverside Gardens Park, West Front Street, attracted between 100 to 150 people. The crowd included Borough Council members Edward Zipprich and Kathy Horgan, candidates for various races, clergy members, and many from the surrounding communities who were motivated to express their concern over the events earlier in the day in Charlottesville, Virginia.There, members of various white supremacist and anti-government groups marched and clashed with counter-protesters over the planned removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee, a confederate Civil War general. The demonstration, labeled the “Unite the Right” rally, conducted by what is often described as “alt-right” groups, including members of the Ku Klux Klan, neo-Nazis, anti-government groups and others expressing support for what they deem “white culture,” offered blatant racist and hate rhetoric.The violence there led to the death of one woman who was struck by a car driven into a crowd earlier on Saturday; two Virginia State Police troopers also died when the helicopter they were flying in to monitor the crowds crashed. Dozens of others were injured in the melee, various media outlets reported.“So much hate has been unleashed,” said the Rev. Virginia Jarocha-Ernst, minister for the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Monmouth County, in Lincroft.But this gathering was for a different reason, she announced. “We are here to say ‘no’ to hate,” Jarocha-Ernst said. “We are here to say ‘no’ to racism.”“May we find a way to end this,” was Jarocha-Ernst’s wish.Red Bank resident Kate Triggiano, who is the co-chair of the Monmouth County Young Progressives Committee and has been active on a number of progressive and liberal political fronts, said she was watching in dismay as the day’s events unfolded on cable TV news. She said she had started to receive calls from friends asking about getting something together in response. “We knew we had to do something, we wanted to do something,” Triggiano said. She explained she began spreading the word through social media, with others on Facebook continuing the thread, with the crowd convening about 8 p.m.The group on hand sang hymns and offered their observations concerning the day’s events.Despite what motivated it, “This is magnificent,” said the Rev. Gilbert Caldwell, looking at the peaceful crowd. Caldwell, a self-described civil rights advocate, said he had participated in the Freedom Summer, when he and others traveled to the South in 1964 to help register African-Americans to vote – facing violence and intimidation by groups like the KKK. “So, I’ve been around a whole lot,” and have seen violence of this type before, he said. “It seems to me in the U.S.A. there are some people who have a problem with people of color,” he added.“It’s time to be angry,” said Rabbi Marc Kline of the Monmouth Reform Temple, Tinton Falls. “It’s time to be angry enough to do something” about the “ignorance that reigns and reigns supreme,” he continued.“Today it is time to stand together,” and to let voices be heard, Kline said. “We have to take this moment to start making phone calls, writing letters,” he advised.“We are on the side of America. We are on the side of freedom. We are on the side of justice,” said Sue Fulton, who was last year’s Democratic candidate for Monmouth County freeholder. “I say we have to remember what side we are on.”Fulton and others criticized President Donald Trump, seeing his comments in response to the day’s events inadequate and tepid. “He didn’t condemn anything,” Fulton said.Trump on Monday offered a more direct condemnation of the various groups after being disparaged from many corners, including from fellow Republicans. In his comments, he called the groups “repugnant.”On Tuesday, however, Trump seemed to reverse himself, telling reporters “both sides” were to blame for the weekend’s violence, unleashing another round of criticism for the president’s views.This article was first published in the Aug. 17-24, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

Bahamas Defence Force Makes Arrest in Bimini

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, October 17, 2017 – Bimini – An American visitor was taken into custody by Royal Bahamas Defence Force Marines on Friday night after he was found with undeclared rounds in the northern Bahamas.While conducting a routine search at the Bimini Bay Marina shortly after 5:00 pm, Marines assigned to the Bimini detachment boarded and searched a 37-ft yellow and white intrepid craft.   It was discovered that a total of 26 rounds were undeclared by the foreign visitor.   He was subsequently taken into custody and handed over to Custom officials for further processing.   He was subsequently fined five hundred dollars ($500.00) and the rounds were confiscated.This type of arrest aligns with the Force’s mandate of guarding our heritage.RBDF Assists with TransportAlso, in other news, the Airwing Section of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force was busy taking officials to Long Island Sunday morning. Representatives from the Port Department and the Ministry of Environmental Health Department were transported on the Defence Force’s aircraft to investigate the circumstances involving a grounded barge offshore Gray’s, Long Island.   More information will be provided as details become available.The Royal Bahamas Defence Force remains committed to protecting the territorial integrity of The Bahamas.(For further information please contact the RBDF Public Relations Department or visit our website: www.rbdf.gov.bs, follow us on Facebook, Twitter and view our Youtube channel) -rbdf-#GuardOurHeritagePress Release: RBDFPhoto credit: RBDF Related Items:last_img read more

Police in standoff with armed suspect in Hillcrest home

first_img Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter May 30, 2018 Posted: May 30, 2018 KUSI Newsroom Updated: 6:05 PMcenter_img KUSI Newsroom, SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — Police Wednesday morning surrounded a residence in Hillcrest and were negotiating with a distraught man who claimed to be armed with a shotgun.Officers initially responded around 7:45 a.m. to a dwelling in the 400 block of Pennsylvania Avenue where a caller reported a possible kidnapping, San Diego police Officer Steve Bourasa said.When officers arrived, two people in the residence came out, but a third person stayed inside, where he claimed to have a shotgun and a desire to harm himself, police said.Police were unable to confirm if the man had a shotgun, but as of 9:45 a.m., he was still refusing to exit the residence, Bourasa said. Negotiators were attempting to convince him to surrender peacefully.Motorists were asked to avoid the area near Fourth, Fifth and Pennsylvania avenues, portions of which were expected to be closed until the standoff ended. Police in standoff with armed suspect in Hillcrest homelast_img read more

11th Anniversary of the UPLIFT Tribute

first_img KUSI Newsroom 11th Anniversary of the UPLIFT Tribute Posted: November 27, 2018 November 27, 2018 Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI)  – The nonprofit UPLIFT is hosting an event called “The Gift of Collaboration” to benefit vulnerable students, seniors and homeless in San Diego.The event is Saturday December 1st and tickets are still available.For more information click here. last_img read more