SUPER MEG ON WAY HOME WITH HOST OF OLYMPIC MEDALS

first_imgBRILLIANT Meg Carr is pictured with her sisters Katie, Hannah, Annie, Molly and Nell after winning FOUR medals at the Special Olympics in LimerickGymnast Meg, from Hawthorne Heights in Letterkenny, won an astonishing three gold and one silver.That’s one very proud bunch of sisters! Well done Meg! SUPER MEG ON WAY HOME WITH HOST OF OLYMPIC MEDALS was last modified: June 15th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalletterkennyMeg CarrSpecial Olympicslast_img read more

Half-time: Burnley 1 Brentford 0

first_imgBrentford trailed at the break at Turf Moor to a Michael Keane header.The goal, on 25 minutes, came against the run of play after the Bees had looked the better side in the opening stages.Burnley keeper Tom Heaton turned away an Alan Judge free-kick and was then equal to a shot from Lasse Vibe, who looked the brightest of the Brentford players.Vibe also latched on to a Konstantin Kerschbaumer through ball but delayed his shot and allowed Heaton to block with his legs.Burnley then scored with their second serious attempt on goal, a corner nodded in by Keane at the far post.That settled the home side down a little and quelled Brentford’s bright start, with Scott Arfield blazing a good opportunity over the bar.Alan McCormack forced Heaton into a save at his near post before being booked for a strong challenge on Burnley left-back Ben Mee.Burnley: Heaton; Darikwa, Duff, Keane, Mee; Boyd, Jones, Arfield, Kightly; Hennings, Jutkiewicz.Subs: Gilks, Ward, Anderson, Taylor, Vokes, Vossen, Sordell.Brentford: Button; McCormack, Dean, Tarkowski, Bidwell; Judge, Diagouraga, Kerschbaumer, Gogia; Hofmann, Vibe.Subs: Bonham, Barbet, Colin, O’Connell, Udumaga, Clarke, Senior.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Preston v QPR line-ups: Rangers duo miss out, PNE changes

first_imgEmbed from Getty ImagesQPR are without Conor Washington and Grant Hall at Deepdale.Both players have failed to recover in time after going off during the midweek win against Wigan with calf and shin problems respectively.James Perch is therefore set to start in midfield and there is a starting place too for on-loan winger Kazenga LuaLua.Preston make two changes, with Tommy Spurr and Daniel Johnson coming in.Preston: Maxwell, Clarke, Huntington, Spurr, Cunningham, Horgan, Browne, Johnson, McGeady, Robinson, Hugill. Subs: Lindegaard, Boyle, Gallagher, Barkhuizen, Makienok, May, Beckford.QPR: Smithies, Furlong, Onuoha, Lynch, Bidwell, Wszolek, Perch, Manning, Freeman, LuaLua, Smith. Subs: Ingram, Goss, Mackie, Luongo, Ngbakoto, Petrasso, Sylla.   Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch) x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Raiders bring Keon Hatcher back after Brandon LaFell’s season-ending Achilles injury

first_imgALAMEDA — The Raiders signed wide receiver Keon Hatcher to their 53-man roster Monday to replace Brandon LaFell, who injured his Achilles in the Raiders’ win over the Cardinals on Sunday. LaFell heads to injured reserve, and his season is over.He sustained the injury on an acrobatic 24-yard catch on 3rd-and-4 midway through the third quarter, his second catch of the day after an earlier 5-yard touchdown grab. LaFell entered Sunday as the Raiders’ No. 1 receiver with knee injuries to Jordy …last_img read more

Meds on wheels for positive change

first_imgSizwe Nzima runs an innovative business that is helping to solve overcrowding at public health facilities, while also improving the lives of people who rely on chronic medication. (Image: http://www.facebook.com/RaymondAckermanAcademyCapeTown) MEDIA CONTACTS • Sizwe Nzima   +27 74 453 3633 RELATED ARTICLES • Meet a top social entrepreneur • SA’s second health train rolls out • SA, Cuba to train more doctors • New eye care unit for KZN children Wilma den HartighSizwe Nzima, a young entrepreneur from Khayelitsha in the Western Cape, has started an innovative business that is helping to solve overcrowding at public health facilities, while also improving the lives of people who rely on chronic medication.Instead of standing in long queues for hours, Nzima’s Iyeza Express collects chronic medication from local clinics and delivers them by bicycle to Khayelitsha residents, at their homes.Recognising a needHis idea to create the business came about after reading a newspaper article about clinics struggling to cope with patients queuing for hours to pick up chronic medication.“I used to collect medication for my grandma for three years and experienced first-hand what happens,” he says, adding that it isn’t only elderly people who are affected.The majority of people who queue for their medicine are able-bodied and waste time that could have been spent at work. “These were people who would happily pay for affordable delivery of their medicine, allowing them to save their sick leave – if they get any – for days when they are really ill,” he says.He was aware of non-profit charity organisations that collect medicine for bed-ridden and elderly people, but there wasn’t a similar service for working people.“I thought to myself that I must do something and that surely there must be a need for a service that would streamline the process,” he explains. “I realised it will also take the load off public health facility workers.”Solutions for South Africa’s challengesNzima and his two business partners are social entrepreneurs at heart, and his goal is to find solutions to the problems in his community, and in doing so make a contribution to improving the economy.“We are all about social change and we are coming up with business ideas that can change society, help our community and uplift the economy,” he says.“Business isn’t just about making money, but also about bringing about positive change.”Less overcrowding, better health, more jobsNzima decided to establish the Iyeza Express service, launching the pilot earlier this year in May. The business has only been up and running for a few months, but the response from residents has been positive.“The service encourages people to go to work and stay healthy as they aren’t tempted to stop taking their life- saving medication because they have run out,” he says. “What I’m doing is helping to improve people’s quality of life and life expectancy.”The business is saving time and money for his clients, but it is also creating much needed jobs for young people who know their way around Khayelitsha’s network of streets.The service operates within Khayelitsha, using bicycles to transport medicines. “This is the most cost effective way and keeps the service affordable, and it is environment-friendly,” Nzima says.Clients pay a small fee of R10 (US$1.1) per collection, and medicines are currently collected from Michael Mapongwane Hospital and the Site B District Hospital.Nzima has about 40 clients at the moment, but he anticipates that this number will increase as the community still needs build trust in his service. Next year he hopes to take the service to other parts of Cape Town, but his long term vision is to expand the business nationally.“For me, this is a national problem and it needs a national solution. The sky is the limit,” he says.Formalising the serviceNzima is working to get official approval from the authorities at Khayelitsha clinics to collect medicines for patients. The Department of Health in the province allowed him to conduct surveys at health facilities to find out what people think about his service, what they need and how he can improve it.“Hopefully, if I get permission, I can collect in bigger volumes,” he says. “People at the health facilities are starting to get to know me. Sometimes I’ve been chased away, but I am overcoming these barriers.”A call to South Africa’s youthNzima’s novel approach to finding solutions for South Africa’s problems is getting him noticed. He recently took part in a panel discussion on business training at the Youth Entrepreneurship Conference and Expo, held earlier this month at the Bellville Campus of the Cape Peninsula University of Technology.The young entrepreneur, who also completed a six-month intensive business training course at the Raymond Ackerman Academy, was nominated as one of the seed funding winners in the South African Breweries Innovation Awards. Nzima was one of 24 finalists selected from over 200 applications, and one of six chosen to receive seed funding.“I couldn’t believe it. My business was only starting out; while others were going for at least two years already,” he says.He believes that young people have what it takes to be change makers in South Africa and the world, by developing economically viable business solutions that can also bring about positive change in society.“Young people should be the innovators. Every young person needs to decide how they are going to use their power for good,” he says.Nzima and his business partners are also involved in setting up other projects, such as a recycling business and an initiative to educate people about gangsterism.  “Making money is good, but you have to give something back. This is also what they taught us at the Academy,” he says.“I believe young people have the power to change the world, if the youth can understand this, they will stop focusing on things like drugs and crime. We can change the world, make it safer and improve our economy in this way.”last_img read more

An Off-Grid Solar Community

first_imgNot much sun during the winterOur climate is not good for solar in the winter. Virtually anywhere in the U.S. is at least as good as we are, or better. Certainly the eastern U.S. has similar solar resources. But here’s the thing: for nine months of the year, we will produce about 7 times what we need for our electrical demand! Yikes, what a nice problem to have. (We deserve this problem, we created it!)So, how much domestic hot water do we use? (You may have guessed that I know exactly how much.) I have installed a water meter on the 95% efficient 200,000 BTU/h propane on-demand water heater that supplies the whole house: 80,000 BTU/day, or 23.5 kWh if we think in terms of an electric plain-Jane water heater tank. Easy: we have up to 50 kWh on many days leftover. Now we could chop that down to 9 kWh by using a heat-pump water heater, but do we need to scrimp? It is an edgy question.We plan to get an electric vehicle soon to mop up some of that excess electric production, but both together could be supplied rather easily for nine months per year. Birken Forest Monastery is a retreat center in the mountains of British Columbia. It’s located at an elevation of 4,000 feet at Latitude 51, and experiences about 9,000 heating degree days (Fahrenheit) per year. The buildings are about 15 years old.We are off the grid. The nearest electricity line is 4 miles away, and it would cost about $200,000 to bring grid power in. (Then, of course, we would still have to pay for the electricity.) So off-grid it is, and will remain. PV costs are dropping fastFast forward in time, through an 80 kWh wet lead-acid battery bank for 7 years, to an 80 kWh maintenance-free AGM lead-acid battery bank for 6 years, to the present: we now have a recently installed 40 kWh AGM maintenance-free Surrette battery bank. Notice that this bank is half the size of the previous two. The cost of our latest battery bank: $8,000; life expectancy, 8 years.The reason for the smaller battery bank: the PV array went from 1.8 kW to 3.4 kW in 2009, and then in November 2014 to 11.4 kW!That’s a startling jump in solar power. Why? The economics are these: The additional 8 kW array was installed by an electrical engineer and two journeymen electricians for $3 per watt. There were no subsidies, no tax rebates, no special deals. The only things that weren’t new were the previously installed inverters.A new age in off-grid living has arrived. Old formulas must be revisited. Monitoring is essentialI carefully monitor all systems with sophisticated devices such as the Pentametric battery monitor, an hour counter on the diesel generator, a TED 5000 whole-house monitor, and daily notes and observations. December is the worst month, averaging 47 hours of bright sunshine (about 1.5 hours per day).Now that we have a much bigger PV array, what will happen to our diesel use? In December 2013, when we had a 3.4-kW PV array, the diesel run-time was 60 hours. In December 2014, with our new 11.4-kW PV array, generator run-time was only 10 hours. Hmmm.We are short about 50 kWh from being 100% off-grid solar. The generator run-times occurred on seven occasions, with each occasion requiring no more than 10 kWh. Conclusion? An additional battery bank rated at 20 kWh would zero out the generator year ’round! Now that may not mean much to you on-grid types, but any off-gridder will know that that is traditionally impossible amongst us forest-dwelling folk.Think again, my fellow hobbits, think again! Lowering electrical demandNow the question: “Is it worth it?” In order to answer that, I have to expand the view to include the rest of the set-up.Here is a snapshot of the main house. It measures 10,000 square feet. (Yes, you heard that right.) It has 12 bedrooms. It can accommodate 15 people and another 8 can use the facilities (sleeping in 8 separate “tiny houses”). The total population of 24 uses 5 washrooms, showers, cooking, 4 computers, all LED lighting, a 300-foot-deep drilled well, refrigerators, freezers, etc.Now our average population is 12 to 15 people, but hundreds of people stream through year ’round. Our average electrical demand is only 12 kwh per day!Yes, there is a deep back story to how we do it. I mean, we are talking about ¾ kWh per day per person, with all modern conveniences, including four-slice toasters, microwaves, dual-flush toilets, 4 showers, pressure pumps, a well pump, two refrigerators, and a freezer. (The refrigerators and freezer together use 1.2 kWh per day. They are in a large “cool room.”)So without carefully controlling our electrical demand with super-efficient appliances, our 100% off-grid solar community would not be possible. Years of off-grid experienceI have lived here for 14 years and have gained much off-grid experience and knowledge by the sometimes harsh teaching methods of Mother Reality. I should mention that I have been a Buddhist monk for the last 28 years. It doesn’t matter much, except that my training is to find simple and sufficient ways of life. How we do things, I believe, is appropriate to a comfortable American lifestyle as well, so I hope you can apply any of these strategies to your own houses, whether off-grid or on.I won’t go into too much detail about the evolutionary process, but it is important to note that our first set of photovoltaic (PV) panels, rated at 1.8 kW, cost about $10 per watt installed. At that price, the PV system still made sense compared to our 12-kW Kubota liquid-cooled 1,800 rpm diesel generator. (By the way, the Kubota generator about as fuel-efficient as possible for any kind of generator.) We charged a bank of batteries with it, which optimized the engine efficiency even more.How efficient was the generator, you wonder? About 32%. The energy you capture from a gallon of diesel is about one-third of its potential. Diesel fluctuates in cost; it’s at least $4 per gallon in Canada… sometimes $5. That translates to 50 cents per kWh of electricity, plus the life-cycle cost of the generator — so add maybe 20 cents. So the brutal reality of high-cost electricity (70 cents per kWh) turns you into an inventor/economist/minimalist, overnight. Ajahn Sona was born in Canada. His background as a layperson was in classical guitar performance. He was ordained as a Theravada Buddhist monk at the Bhavana Society in West Virginia. In 1994, he founded the first Birken Forest Monastery near Pemberton, British Columbia. In 2001, Ajahn Sona established Birken in its final location just south of Kamloops, British Columbia. Ajahn Sona posts comments on the GBA web site under the pen name “Ven Sonata.” Superinsulation helps reduce our energy needsI’ll conclude with a brief description of the enormous house. It is superinsulated, with R-80 ceilings. The walls range from R-60 down to R-20 (on the south wall.) The big innovation is our R-25 polyiso-and-birch-plywood insulating shutters for all our windows. The building has 1,350 square feet of argon-filled low-e dual-pane windows. When it became apparent that the building is over-glazed, we permanently installed insulated R-30 exterior shutters over about 500 square feet of glazing, leaving about 850 square feet of windows exposed. These windows have been fitted with hinged R-25 shutters that open inward. Most are hinged at the top, although some are side hinged.More than any other feature, these gasket-sealed insulating shutters contribute more to heat retention than any wonder machine or triple-glazed German miracle windows, for far less money… 80% less. (I’d be happy to go into detail if requested). During the 12- to 16-hour night, we basically don’t have any heat loss through our windows. In the daytime, with panels open, there is solar gain. It’s a win-win situation! For eight months of the year, we leave the panels open.The space heating is supplied by two indoor high-efficiency wood stoves. We burn 5 cords of fir per year, locally collected. (British Columbia is the Saudi Arabia of firewood.) We don’t need any electric fans for air circulation.Although there is in-floor radiant heat distribution throughout, we do not use it, ever. (Another learning experience). So for space heating, we need about 75 MBTU per year in a 9,000 heating degree day zone. Not bad. It’s not a Passivhaus (that would require 50 MBTU for a house this size), but it doesn’t require a heat-recovery ventilator! We have exhaust-only ventilation using 5 bathroom fans and 2 kitchen fans. Natural air purification also occurs through 70 large houseplants — a method recommended by NASA for air purification (not kidding).By the way, the kitchen is completely isolated from the main building by a glass door during cooking, so no air contamination spreads throughout the house. (This design detail just might catch on; this type of kitchen isolation was standard in large 19th-century houses.)All in all, good air, good light, good vibe, good economics. And thank you, Green Building Advisor, for so many good thoughts on building. I have benefited immensely.A concluding note: Our total energy use from all sources is 35,000 kWh per year. The Passivhaus allowance for a house this size would be 110,000 kWh per year. So we use 70% less energy (total kWh) per year than the Passivhaus allowance. Something to reflect on. Cost-effectiveness analysisSo back to economics. How much propane savings? About $1,000 year.How much gasoline savings? $2,000.How much diesel and generator life wear? Maybe $800. Total savings, about $3,700 per year.The payback period for the off-grid set-up (PV and battery payback) is (drum roll) 10 years. That includes the rather short life of the batteries (8 years) and the rather long life (30 years) of the solar panels.last_img read more

United Methodist Church scraps plans to host General Conference in the Philippines

first_img Catholicism A rabbi pleads with AG William Barr: Don’t bring the death penalty to Pittsburgh Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,(RNS) — The United Methodist Church has scrapped plans for its first General Conference meeting outside the United States.The global denomination had been planning to hold the 2024 meeting of its decision-making body in Manila, capital of the Philippines.But plans for a meeting there, first announced in 2015, are now off.Sara Hotchkiss, business manager for the Commission on General Conference, said organizers could not find convention space available for two full weeks to host the gathering of United Methodists from around the world.So the General Conference will be held elsewhere.“No one has done anything wrong, or there’s no reason not to go. It’s just simply when we did a bid process, the facilities needed for the length of our conference were not available,” Hotchkiss said.RELATED: The ’Splainer: What happened at the United Methodist General Conference?The business manager said the commission, which chooses the locations for and plans the denomination’s quadrennial meeting, had not received any bids from facilities it had contacted during the bid process to host the meeting.Those bids were due in early July, she said.Bishop Rodolfo Alfonso “Rudy” Juan of the Davao Area in the southern Philippines — the commission member who initially had invited the General Conference to the Philippines — told the United Methodist News Service the decision made him “sad.”“I spoke passionately about my disappointment in this decision,” Juan said. “I did not support the cancellation, but I respect the decision.”The Philippines, red, located in eastern Asia. Map courtesy of Creative CommonsFinances and the “current climate in the church” did not play a role in that decision, the Rev. Gary George, secretary of the commission, said in the UMNS report.The United Methodist Church is the second-largest Protestant denomination in the U.S., and its membership is growing most quickly in the Philippines and many African countries.The Commission on General Conference made the decision not to hold the 2024 meeting in the Philippines last week during its meeting in Lexington, Ky.RELATED: Adam Hamilton on ‘Methodists in the middle’ and what’s next for the denominationAlso at that meeting, a task force reported to the commission it had found “credible objective evidence that four ineligible persons cast votes using the credentials of delegates who were not present” at a special session of the General Conference held this February in St. Louis to discuss the place of LGBTQ people in the church.Delegates to the special session approved the so-called Traditional Plan, which strengthened the denomination’s rules barring LGBTQ United Methodists from ordination and marriage.The four ineligible voters would not have impacted the outcome of the vote on the Traditional Plan, according to a press release from the United Methodist Church.But they might have had an impact on a narrow vote on a measure allowing congregations to leave the denomination with their property.The commission determined that vote is void and is asking the denomination Council of Bishops to refer it to its top court, the Judicial Council.Jessica LaGrone, a member of the Commission on a Way Forward, presents the Traditional Plan during the special session of the United Methodist Church General Conference in St. Louis on Feb. 24, 2019. RNS photo by Kit DoyleDonations to church ministries, including the General Conference, have “declined significantly” in the months since the special session, according to UMNS.And both opponents and supporters of the Traditional Plan are still discussing how to proceed since the vote. Among their options are leaving the denomination, pushing for a new plan to change its structure to allow United Methodists with differing viewpoints to stay together or dissolving it entirely.The next General Conference meeting will gather 862 delegates, both clergy and lay people, from May 5-15, 2020, in Minneapolis.Hotchkiss said she didn’t have information to share about where the 2024 meeting might be held.But, the business manager added, there is no concern that the meeting itself might be canceled. The commission quickly had found a location for the special session after the 2016 General Conference requested it, she noted.And, she said, “Manila and the people of the Philippines and the United Methodists of the Philippines are wonderful, and I know that they could do the hosting that was required to do it.”“I sincerely hope someday to be able to do it.” Columns • Opinion • Simran Jeet Singh: Articles of Faith News Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! Share This! As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.,Kashmiri Americans organize to put a human face to the crisis in their homeland Share This! Tagshomepage featured Philippines UMCGC United Methodist Church United Methodist Church General Conference,You may also like Share This!center_img Emily McFarlan Miller Emily McFarlan Miller is a national reporter for RNS based in Chicago. She covers evangelical and mainline Protestant Christianity.,Add Comment Click here to post a comment By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites We are not all the same, and in our difference we are divine August 30, 2019 Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Emaillast_img read more