Pasadena considers plans for marathon

first_imgIt will take about $850,000 to stage the 26.2-mile race if the City Council approves the marathon, he said, adding that most of it would come from sponsorships and registration fees. Estrada said special events expert Kathy Kinane, whose company most recently staged the Pacific Shoreline Marathon, will attend the meeting with city staff. Councilman Sid Tyler said he thinks the council has a generally favorable view of the marathon concept, as long as it has a strong financial footing. “I think the concept is wonderful, particularly if it became a regular annual event,” Tyler said. “It would help put Pasadena even more on the map, and when these things are done right they become kind of weekend events, with ancillary events that would benefit the city and local businesses. … That’s where the major revenue and costs are. But can this operation pull it off?” Tyler said he feels “very strongly” that the city should be reimbursed for public works and police costs and that the marathon would have to generate enough revenue to cover whatever expenses are involved. Eric Duyshart, Pasadena’s economic development manager, said city staff wants to get a “good sense” of the level of potential sponsorships for the marathon and will work with Pasadena Forward on modifying the route originally proposed. “The route they submitted has all sorts of issues,” Duyshart said. “It might be a nice scenic route through Pasadena from the runners’ standpoint, but shutting down all sorts of streets throughout Pasadena is not something we take lightly.” Councilman Chris Holden said closing some city streets for a part of one day was a “modest trade-off for something that could be really positive” for the community. “I think it would be a wonderful thing for Pasadena, it would do a great job in linking communities,” Holden said. “It would be nice to support it – not just voting for it but getting out there and being a part of it.” Holden, however, sees himself more as a bike rider who would “graduate to running and walking in future years.” “I ran in the \ Marathon on a dare back in 1995 and it almost killed me,” Holden joked. “But as long as I have a couple of years to train, maybe.” For more information, go to www.pasadenamarathon.org. janette.williams@sgvn.com (626) 578-6300, Ext. 4482160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! PASADENA – Plans to stage a Pasadena Marathon and Bike Tour next year are inching along, with organizers confident they have the community support and potential financial backing to pull it off. “We’ve been overwhelmed that so many organizations and individuals have come to the forefront,” said Israel Estrada of Pasadena Forward, the volunteer group working on the event. “We’re putting the final finishing touches to the written proposal” to go before the City Council, Estrada said. “We’re meeting with city staff on Tuesday, planning the route. … There could be a whole lot of adjustment, but so long as \ happens, we’re happy to make any adjustment they want.” So far the group has raised nearly $21,000 through “founding members” and other donations, and Estrada estimates upward of $30,000 is needed to pay for the initial planning costs. last_img read more

Officials aim to gain trust on lab cleanup

first_imgNearly two decades after neighbors learned the hilltop Santa Susana Field Lab was rife with toxic and radioactive contamination, the long-delayed cleanup is at a critical crossroads. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is now considering signing a bill that would force Boeing and the federal government to clean up the former nuclear and rocket-engine test lab to the highest environmental standards. Under judge’s orders, the federal Department of Energy is about to begin a new study of the radioactive and chemical contamination at its former nuclear research facility. And the state agency responsible for controlling toxic contamination at the site recently appointed a new project manager who has pledged unprecedented openness with the public and scrutiny of the cleanup. Located in the hills above Simi Valley and Chatsworth, the Santa Susana Field Lab was developed in the late 1940s for rocket-engine tests and nuclear-energy research. The Department of Energy cleanup of its 90-acre portion of the lab is nearly complete, but Boeing is at least a decade from decontaminating the rest of the site, tainted with chemicals from rocket-engine and laser projects. The management shuffle in the state Department of Toxic Substances Control came after a disastrous public hearing last August, when high-ranking officials admitted the DTSC had made a mistake in allowing Boeing to truck out – unstudied – thousands of tons of contaminated soil from a burn pit where workers had incinerated hazardous waste for decades. Activists found old records documenting waste disposal in the burn pit, and DTSC’s ignorance of the pit’s potential contamination was the final straw for neighbors. “We don’t have belief or trust in your process,” RocketdyneWatch founder Elizabeth Crawford railed at DTSC during the hearing. Riley said the meeting was a wake-up call for the agency. “It was embarrassing. I don’t ever want to see the department and the public placed in a position like that ever again,” he said. Since Riley was appointed about five months ago, he and a team of experts have held several meetings with activists to hash out reports and review concerns. “I almost feel like it’s a new agency,” longtime activist Christina Walsh said of the DTSC. “I think we can make tremendous progress now.” Walsh said the agency now seems to be taking her concerns seriously. Earlier this year, she and some colleagues from the cleanuprocketdyne.org were hiking in the regional park next to the field lab when they saw some foamlike material half-buried in a creek bed. Poking around in the soil, they found pipes and more of the same material embedded in the bank. Walsh didn’t know what the junk was – or whether it posed a risk – but she was pretty sure she knew where it came from: the field lab. Walsh and her colleagues had found suspicious junk in the hills around the field lab before, but calls to environmental regulators were usually met with skepticism or exasperation. But this time, Walsh said she found an eager ear at the DTSC. “I was expecting them to refuse to look at it. I really did anticipate a hostile response,” Walsh said. “We invited them on a hike and they showed up! They showed up seriously, with geologists.” Geologists ordered the area tested and fenced off. They found the material was a type of insulation that contained asbestos – not imminently dangerous, but not the kind of stuff you want Boy Scouts traipsing through either. It came from the liquid-oxygen plant at the field lab. “The stuff was there, and it clearly came from Boeing and NASA’s operations, and they have accepted responsibility, and they’re going to be moving it,” Riley said. “Our commitment to (the community) is we will investigate all of these concerns. We don’t have the resources to do so immediately in each and every case, but we aren’t forgetting about these things.” kerry.cavanaugh@dailynews.com (213) 978-0390160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! “Our approach to the project has changed,” said Norman Riley, project manager for the California Department of Toxic Substances Control since April. “We have some new people involved and a renewed commitment to transparency about our involvement and efforts on the project.” To ensure that happens, the state agency signed a new consent order last month, setting a 2017 deadline for Boeing, the federal Department of Energy and NASA to complete the site cleanup. The order also establishes timelines, and it levies $15,000-a-day fines for delays and inaccuracies in reports detailing the location and extent of contamination. Boeing officials said they’re committed to working with the state to decontaminate the land. “There are a lot of developments taking place right now,” said Dan Beck, spokesman for Boeing. “We just want to make sure the go-forward plans with regulatory agencies are crafted appropriately and enable us to move forward with the cleanup.” last_img read more

Dog fouling stations needed to solve messy issue in local towns

first_imgMore designated areas are needed for the disposal of dog bags in towns such as Letterkenny, according to local councillor Michael McBride.Local residents have complained about the high amount of dog mess on footpaths around Letterkenny recently, which led to the issue being brought to the county council this month.Cllr McBride said: “If you are around Letterkenny, the amount of people out walking dogs in very high. The thing that’s missing is the stations with litter bags for foul.” The council has been asked to provide funding to allow for the rollout of fouling stations county-wide over the new term, giving priority to areas such as Letterkenny.In response to the motion, Senior Engineer Bryan Cannon said that 100,000 dog foul bags were given out by the local authority this year alone. He highlighted the success of the “any bag, any bin” campaign which highlights that dog foul may be disposed of in any bin so long as it is contained within any bag.Compostable dog foul bags are provided to the public and community groups from all Public Services Centres and a number of other locations countywide. Dog fouling stations needed to solve messy issue in local towns was last modified: September 30th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Friday’s Chelsea quiz

first_imgTest your Chelsea knowledge. See how many of these five questions you can answer correctly…[wp-simple-survey-10]Click here for yesterday’s Chelsea quizClick here for Monday’s Barcelona v Chelsea quizFollow West London Sport on Twitter Find us on Facebooklast_img

Remembering South African writer Peter Abrahams: 1919 – 2017

first_imgSouth African writer Peter Abrahams died on 18 January 2017. An early pioneer in the exploration of race identity in South Africa, he was a literary giant who was at the forefront of capturing the injustice of apartheid.Writer Peter Abrahams was born in Vrededorp, Johannesburg, in 1919. He lived in London and Jamaica, and his extensive collection of fiction and non-fiction focussed on pan-Africanism and race identity in South Africa. (Image: Wikipedia)CD AndersonPeter Abrahams, who died aged 97 at his home in Saint Andrew Parish, Jamaica, was one of South Africa’s most distinguished writers. His fiction and non-fiction work challenged and dissected the complexities of the black South African identity. His biting criticism of the early days of apartheid and his exploration of pan-Africanist philosophy were fuelled by the need to tell the world of the injustice of racism and colonialism.Abrahams will be remembered best for his Mine Boy, which was added to the South African school curriculum in the early 2000s.First published in 1946, Peter Abrahams’ Mine Boy exposed the condition of black South Africans under a white regime. It presents a portrait of labour discrimination, appalling housing conditions and one man’s humanitarian act of defiance. (Image: Justseeds website)Mine Boy, a brutal story of South African urban migration, became the first novel by a black South African to be published internationally. It was the third book by a black South African to be published, after Sol Plaatje’s Mhudi in 1930 and RRR Dhlomo’s 1928 novel, An African Tragedy.“I am emotionally involved in South Africa,” Abrahams said in 1957. “If I am ever liberated from this bondage of racialism, there are some things much more exciting to me, objectively, to write about. But this world has such a social orientation, and I am involved in this world and I can’t cut myself off.”During his most prolific years, 1946 to 1966, Abrahams wrote eight novels, as well as memoirs and political essays. His 1948 novel, The Path of Thunder, inspired the ballet piece, İldırımlı yollarla, by Azerbaijani composer Gara Garayev.Abrahams’ early yearsAbrahams was born in Vrededorp, Johannesburg, in 1919 to an Ethiopian father and coloured mother.According to his obituary in The New York Times on 22 January 2017, Abrahams was inspired to read and write at a young age when he heard Shakespeare’s Othello. A prodigious student, he began contributing poetry and short fiction to so-called bantu publications after completing his basic education. As a young budding writer, he consumed literature, particularly the works of black American writers.“I read every one of the books on the shelf marked American Negro literature,” he wrote in his memoir Tell Freedom: Memories of Africa in 1954. “To (these) writings of men and women who lived a world away from me … I owe a great debt for crystallising my vague yearnings to write and for showing me the long dream was attainable.”This knowledge also inspired his political thought and his desire to capture the black South African psyche in words.Ship to LondonAfter a stint as the editor of a Durban socialist magazine in 1939, Abrahams found work aboard a ship bound for London. In the British capital, he worked as a journalist on the British Communist Party’s Daily Worker newspaper.Peter Abrahams’ 1956 novel A Wreath for Udomo was inspired by his friendships with with African intellectuals and revolutionaries in exile in the UK. The novel deals with the complex realities and conflicts between duty to nation and ideals. (Image: Justseeds website)He lived in London’s African immigrant community, meeting exiled political figures and intellectuals, including future Kenyan leader Jomo Kenyatta; Kwame Nkrumah, who would go on to lead Ghana to independence from Britain; and Trinidadian pan-Africanist George Padmore. The experience inspired his most multifaceted work, the 1956 novel A Wreath for Udomo, about political and social transitions in postcolonial Africa through the eyes of the continent’s political exiles. Renowned English literary scholar Harvey Curtis Webster called the book “the most perceptive novel … about the complex interplay between British imperialism and African nationalism”.During the 1950s, Abrahams travelled across Africa, including a return to South Africa to observe the rise of postcolonial, pan-Africanist political movements. These essays, long considered the most authoritative work on the era, were later published as Return to Goli.Settling in the CaribbeanAfter being commissioned by the British colonial office to research and write a comprehensive history of Jamaica, Abrahams wrote of the island and its people: “…in the stumbling and fumbling reaching forward of its people, is dramatized … the most hopeful image I know of the newly emerging underdeveloped world”.With his wife Daphne and their three children, he made Jamaica his home for over four decades.South Africa, however, remained foremost in his writing; in particular, it was the setting of his 1965 novel, A Night of Their Own, about the anti-apartheid underground. This inspired his 1985 magnum opus, The View From Coyaba, a detailed transgenerational novel about black struggle movements in Africa, America and the Caribbean.As he got older and the postcolonial era reached its pinnacle with the end of apartheid in the 1990s, Abrahams felt less obligation to capture the zeitgeist of black African political thought. Instead, he let new, younger literary voices speak about the evolving movement.Speaking to Caribbean Beat magazine in 2003, Abrahams said: “I became a whole person when I finally put away the exile’s little packed suitcase. When Mandela came out of jail and when apartheid ended, I ceased to have this burden of South Africa. I shed it.”Abrahams never returned to his country of birth.Overdue tribute?The Daily Maverick’s J Brooks Spector observes, in his lovingly detailed obituary of Abrahams on 25 January 2017, the often overlooked connection between South Africa and the writer, and begs an important question: “Surely there should be a (South African) library named in his honour, an endowed chair in African literature at one of the nation’s premier universities, and a publishing effort reprinting his output in a standard, uniform edition?““Embracing his memory as an early literary pioneer and impact as a writer must also take into consideration the eclecticism of his political thinking, his influence on the pan-African idea, and an ethnicity that embraced the near-totality of South African experience,” Spector concludes.Source: New York Times, Daily Maverick, South African History OnlineWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Those conspiring for President’s Rule in Maharashtra are insulting people’s mandate: Sanjay Raut

first_imgSenior Shiv Sena leader Sanjay Raut on Wednesday claimed there was a “consensus” between the BJP and his party before the Maharashtra Assembly elections on sharing the chief minister’s post.Amid the stalemate continuing over government formation in the state, Mr. Raut told reporters here that no fresh proposal has been received from the BJP or sent to it.He claimed farmers and the working class want a Shiv Sena chief minister and have hopes and expectations from the Uddhav Thackeray-led party.To a question on when there would be a consensus on the chief minister’s post, the Rajya Sabha member said, “There was a consensus on the post before elections.”Ruling out any new proposal for government formation, Mr. Raut reiterated that the Shiv Sena expects implementation of what was decided and agreed upon before the elections.“Why waste time on new proposals. We want a discussion on what was agreed upon earlier. No new proposal has been received or sent,” he said.On the possibility of imposition of President’s rule in the state, Mr. Raut said, “We will not be responsible for it. Those conspiring to do this are insulting the people’s mandate.”He said wherever Uddhav Thackeray and his son Aaditya Thackeray, who won the state polls from Worli seat in Mumbai, were touring to review crop losses due to unseasonal rains, the farmers and working class were looking at the party with hopes and expectations.“All are eager to have chief minister from the Shiv Sena,” he said.Mr. Raut refused to respond to a question on whether the NCP has agreed to share the chief minister’s post. “We will talk about it,” he said.The Sharad Pawar-led NCP on Tuesday said a political alternative can be worked out in the state if the Shiv Sena declared that it had snapped ties with the BJP.Sources in the NCP said their party wants Arvind Sawant, the lone Shiv Sena minister in the Union government, to resign before going ahead further with the Sena.There has been no headway in government formation after results of the state polls were declared on October 24.The BJP, which won 105 seats, and the Shiv Sena, which bagged 56 seats, are locked in a bitter tussle over sharing of the chief minister’s post and ministerial portfolios in new government, even 13 days after the Assembly poll verdict handed them enough seats to cobble up a coalition government.They won 161 seats together in the 288-member House, much above the halfway mark of 145.Besides, the opposition NCP won 54 seats while the Congress got 44 seats.last_img read more

ClassNK Expands HKC Verification to SouthEast Asia

first_imgzoom Tokyo-based classification society ClassNK has received its first application for verification from a recycling facility in South-East Asia, Tsuneishi Ship Recycling (Negros).ClassNK completed the document review for a Ship Recycling Facility Plan (SRFP) submitted by TSRNI verifying the facility to be in line with the Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships, 2009 (HKC).Additionally, this marks the first facility designed to comply with the HKC standard from its planning stage. TSRNI would be constructed in Negros Occidental, the Philippines, and operated under the umbrella of Tsuneishi Group.In preparation for the completion of the facility, TSRNI developed the SRFP required to obtain certification by competent authority according to the HKC in the future.ClassNK reviewed the SRFP to examine that the document met with the HKC requirements. As the final part of the verification process, the classification society will conduct the on-site inspection, including checks on facilities and actual recycling practices, when ship recycling work commences at TSRNI to confirm its processes conform to the SRFP.“The maritime industry needs appropriate capacity for the safe and environmentally sound ship recycling,” ClassNK’s Junichi Hirata, Project Manager of Ship Recycling Team, said.“We are delighted that TSRNI has chosen ClassNK to verify the facility and it practices. As the first South-East Asia initiative to carry out ship recycling in line with HKC, it represents a major step forward in our mission to promote and facilitate safe and environmentally-friendly ship recycling across the world,” Hirata added.last_img read more