‘We needed it’: Humboldt Crabs score 11 unanswered in 12-7 comeback win over Prune Packers

first_imgThrough 22 consecutive innings — spanning from the second inning of Sunday’s loss to the San Luis Obispo Blues to the end of the fifth inning of Thursday’s game against the Healdsburg Prune Packers — the Humboldt Crabs scored one lone run.During the final four innings of Thursday’s game the Crabs, which entered the contest averaging less than 2.5 runs-per-game, scored a dozen runs en route to a 12-7 comeback win over the Prune Packers at Recreation Park in Healdsburg.“We’ve been struggling …last_img read more

Health Advice Keeps Changing

first_imgMany things the experts told us were good for us or bad for us have “evolved” – sometimes into opposite counsel.Health is of huge concern in science, because the only organisms doing science are human beings. We can watch what happens to us and others when we eat certain things. This should be one of the easiest, most repeatable subjects in science. Why can’t the experts get it right?Components of heart healthy diet may differ from what was previously thought (Medical Xpress). Dairy products and meat are back on the table. Much of the advice from a huge study of 218,000 people from 50 countries remains, like limiting carbohydrates, but meat and dairy is OK again. “Our results appeared to apply to people from different parts of the world and so the findings are globally applicable.”Vitamin D—a pseudo-vitamin for a pseudo-disease (Medical Xpress). It wasn’t long ago that the media strongly encouraged most of us to take vitamin D:We are still in love with vitamins a century after they were discovered, with half the US and UK population taking a supplement. Vitamin D – the sunshine vitamin – is the favourite and is believed to have the most proven benefits. Governments, including the UK government, have said that the evidence for vitamin D’s health benefits is so overwhelming that every adult should take it as a supplement for at least six months of the year.Now, that advice is being called into question by a study involving 500,000 participants. Vitamin D’s alleged benefits to strengthen bones seems spurious. Scientists don’t know how to characterize vitamin D deficiency. Some are not even sure it should be called a vitamin at all.We have created another pseudo-disease that is encouraged by vitamin companies, patient groups, food manufacturers public health departments and charities. Everyone likes to believe in a miracle vitamin pill and feels “they are doing something”.How vitamin D and fish oil affect risk of heart attack, stroke and cancer (Medical Xpress). After reading the previous article, here’s one to confuse you again. Another big study is trying to figure out if vitamin D and fish oil really do some good. So before taking them off your daily supplement routine, wait for this study to see if these popular pills actually have some science behind their purported benefits (or not).Massive trial shows limited value for popular supplements (Nature). The world’s leading journal weighs in on the controversy, saying, “No evidence found to indicate that vitamin D and fish oil fight cancer.” Both popular supplements also failed to show any benefit for preventing heart disease. This from a 5-year controlled trial involving 25,000 healthy men and women in their fifties and older.Is a low carb diet dangerous? (Medical Xpress). Athletes and the health conscious assiduously cutting their carbs to get fit might want to reconsider. Low carb diets might not only be useless; they could even be dangerous.Pasta. Sourdough. Mashed potatoes. If you are one of the legions of dieters out there who have been religiously cutting carbs in an attempt to get lean and fit, you may be surprised by a recent study that showed that low carb diets may not be healthy after all. In fact, they may be unsafe.Research presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Germany found that diets very low in carbohydrates may actually increase the risk of premature death over time. Yikes.Read the article to see why this is. Those tempted by the low-carb fad sometimes compensate by eating too much fat.Can chocolate, tea, coffee and zinc help make you more healthy? Scientists discover new protection against oxidative stress (Science Daily). Chocolate and caffeine used to be twin bogeymen of a poor diet. This article resuscitates them somewhat, arguing that adding zinc to the polyphenols in these foods could have a beneficial effect.No such thing as sugar highs, says pediatric endocrinologist (Medical Xpress). Parents who wish to argue with this expert might have to reconsider whether it’s really the sugar that makes kids hyper. It might be the excitement of Halloween candy and birthday parties that is doing it – not the sugar.“It’s a myth,” said Elizabeth Rosolowsky, a pediatric endocrinologist in the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry.“Parents may observe more energy in their kids after eating sugar, but it’s one of those self-fulfilling notions—a belief that comes true because we are acting like it’s true,” she said.Rosolowsky busts another myth, that sugar causes diabetes. It’s not the sugar, but the excess of carbs that gets stored as fat that predisposes some to become diabetics, she says.Food activates brown fat: How brown adipose tissue reacts to a carbohydrate-rich meal (Science Daily). Not all fat is bad. Brown fat is the “good fat,” experts think, because it produces energy instead of just storing it. The question is how to activate it. Believe it or not, exposure to cold, or a meal of carbohydrates, might be the key. Read the article before trusting it; the bottom line is that “further studies” are needed.Update 11/16/18: An article on Science Daily basically admits that scientists still do not know if dietary fat is good or bad.Jonathan Wells jokes in Zombie Science about evolving dietary advice. He likes eggs, but remembers when the experts all said that eggs are bad for you. Now, they are respectable again. He didn’t stop eating eggs, but now can feel less guilty about it. Have you had a similar experience? You try to eat what’s healthy, only to find out that something you believed was good for you is actually bad for you, or vice versa. Years ago the government pushed the “Food Pyramid.” It was posted in most schools. Recently, scientists exposed special interests behind the iconic diagram, and some think the pyramid should be inverted. If scientists cannot be sure about something as close to home as our bodies and our health, how can they pontificate about what the world and the universe were doing millions and billions of years ago? Let this be a lesson about science; it is always tentative. You can count on future findings to overturn some of the things that are taught as gospel truth today.In the meantime, it’s probably best to trust some of your common sense. Eat a variety of foods, don’t eat anything to excess, exercise as well as watching your diet, avoid fads, and remember that attitude is probably just as important as what you eat. 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Talking about Transitions

first_imgby Sara Croymans, MEd, AFCRecently, I had the opportunity to have a conversation with Jolaina Falkenstein, military Service member and a mental health professional, about military transitions. Jolaina is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT) with Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota where she provides individual, couples, and family therapy. In partnership with the Minnesota Department of Veteran Affairs, her clinic also provides free services to the Veteran population and their families. Jolaina is a Veteran and has served in the Army Reserves for over twenty years with two deployments to the Middle East. Currently in her military role as a Sergeant First Class, she supports the Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program; a mandated program designed to support and assist Reserve/Guard Service Members and their families through the pre-, during, and post-deployment process.Listen to the podcast of our conversation at militaryfamilieslearningnetwork.org/podcast/talking-about-transitions/.  This blog highlights a few nuggets from our conversation and provides a listing of the multiple resources Jolaina shared.In the podcast Jolaina emphasized that military transitions involve military Service members and families experiencing change in so many different areas of their lives. Being resilient in times of change involves looking for the positives in a situation. Jolaina encourages Service members, families, and military family service professionals to identify those positives – including the strengths, abilities and talents that Service members and families developed as a result of their experiences. Change can bring opportunities for growth.Jolaina shared one of her favorite quotes by C. JoyBell C. which speaks to change and resilience:The only way that we can live, is if we grow.The only way that we can grow is if we change.The only way that we can change is if we learn.The only way we can learn is if we are exposed.And the only way that we can become exposed is if we throw ourselves out into the open.Do it. Throw yourself.”― C. JoyBell CThroughout the podcast Jolaina shared multiple resources for a variety of groups.Resources/Strategies for Service members & families:• Military One Source – http://www.militaryonesource.mil/; provides resources, individualized consultations, coaching and counseling on many aspects of military life• County Veterans Service Officers (CVSO) promote and protect the rights of Service members and families through education, communication and technology. Locate CVSO across the nation on the National Association of County Veterans Service Officers website at https://www.nacvso.org/• Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) – https://www.va.gov/; the VA provides a variety of benefits and services and assistance to Service members, Veterans, their dependents and survivors.• Vet Centers – https://www.vetcenter.va.gov/; The Vet Centers, available through the VA, offer free services to Service members and their families –• Give an Hour – https://www.giveanhour.org; this national nonprofit organization coordinates local mental health professionals to provide free counseling services with military Service members• Strategies:                                                                                                                                                           o Become aware of community resources before they are neededo Build networks – Military Service members and families are    encouraged to reach out to other military families in your community to become acquainted and build relationships before deployments or other challenges occuro Participate in trainings – Service Members often times are required to participate in a variety of trainings, including Resiliency Training. Jolaina encouraged Service members to take time to think about how to apply the strategies identified in trainings to their life and to be sure to share the information and strategies with family membersResources/Strategies for Military Family Service Professionals:• Become familiar with and network with nationwide resources including those listed above. Building a network and relationships with other military family service professionals will increase your ability to work with Service members and their families.• Military Families Learning Network (MFLN) – https://militaryfamilieslearningnetwork.org; MFLN provides professional development and engagement opportunities for military family service professionalsResources/Strategies for Communities and their residents:• Build relationships and rapport with the military population in your community• Learn who military families are in your community and celebrate them, including military children• Neighbors are encouraged to get out of their homes and build relationships with military Service members and families• Continue to learn about military families and strategies to support them• Building Healthy Military Communities (BHMC) is a multi-year pilot project aims to better understand unique challenges faced by geographically dispersed Service Members and their families that may impact their readiness, resiliency, and well-being. The pilot is being conducted in Indiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Florida, Maryland, Minnesota and New Mexico.Jolaina can be reached at jolaina.falkenstein@gmail.com This post was written by Sara Croymans, MEd, AFC, University of Minnesota Extension Educator, and member of the MFLN Family Transitions team. Family Transitions provides education, resources and networking opportunities for professionals working with military families to build resilience and navigate life cycle transitions. Engage with the MFLN Family Transitions team on our website, Facebook, and Twitter.last_img read more

London Olympics 2012: Discus thrower Krishna Poonia loses plot in finals

first_imgIndian discus thrower Krishna Poonia finished a creditable seventh in the women’s discus throw while the gold medal was won by Sandra Perkovic of Croatia in the 2012 London Games at the Olympic Stadium here on Saturday.Sandra took the gold with throw of 69.11 metres, a national record, while the silver medal was taken by Darya Pishchalnikova of Russia with 67.56 m and Li Yanfeng of China settled for the bronze medal at 67.22m.Poonia’s best effort of 63.62 m came in her fifth and penultimate attempt. The Commonwealth Games gold medallist had 62.42 m in the first attempt and 61.61 in the third and 61.31 in the sixth and the final throw. She had two no-throws in the second and the fourth attempt.Poonia’s efforts here were nowhere near her personal best of 64.76 m that she achieved three months back in Hawaii.last_img read more