Photos: Ex-Sharks star Jeremy Roenick sells Arizona mansion

first_imgFormer San Jose Sharks star Jeremy Roenick has sold his Scottsdale, Ariz. mansion for $3.3 million, reports the L.A. Times.Click here if viewing from a mobile device.The seven-bedroom, eight-bath home sits on 18 acres and has sweeping views of the surrounding desert and mountains. It features a media room, wine tasting spot, a wiffle ball field and a guest house, among many other amenities.The property was purchased in 2005 and had been listed since 2012.  Cathy Fassero with Coldwell Banker …last_img read more

Pollinator workshops offered

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Have you ever thought what it would be like to live in a world without apples, blueberries, strawberries, chocolate, almonds, melons, peaches, or pumpkins? Researchers have indicated that without animal pollinators, these foods would no longer exist.Three-fourths of the world’s flowering plants depend on pollinators to reproduce. Most fruit, vegetable and seed crops — and other plants that provide fiber, medicines, and fuel — are pollinated by animals. Some scientists estimate that one out of every three bites of human food exists because of animal pollinators like bees, butterflies and moths, birds and bats, and beetles and other insects.Pollinators visit flowers in their search for food (nectar and pollen). During a flower visit, a pollinator may accidentally brush against the flower’s reproductive parts, unknowingly depositing pollen from a different flower. The plant then uses the pollen to produce a fruit or seed. Many plants cannot reproduce without pollen carried to them by foraging pollinators.Bees are the main pollinators for fruits and vegetables. There are over 4,000 species of bees native to North America. They nest underground, in twigs and debris, or in dead trees. Nectar-seeking butterflies are daytime garden visitors, and moths are their nocturnal counterpart. These popular creatures pollinate many plants. Hummingbirds are the most common avian pollinators in the continental United States. These tiny wonders prefer tubular flowers in bright, warm colors — especially red.Pollinators are in trouble — bees are disappearing and bats are dying. These and other animal pollinators face many challenges. Habitat loss, disease, parasites, and environmental contaminants have all contributed to their decline.To learn more about pollinators and increase their habitat and populations, plan to attend two free workshops hosted by the Delaware SWCD on June 14 and July 12 at the Orange Township Hall, 1680 Orange Rd, Lewis Center, OH. Each workshop will be held from 7-9 pm. These are separate workshops addressing different topics. For full details and a registration form, go to our website at www.delawareswcd.org.last_img read more

Pansare murder: court grants conditional bail to Dr. Tawde

first_imgIn yet another setback to the Govind Pansare murder case, the Kolhapur sessions court on Tuesday granted conditional bail to Hindutva activist Virendra Tawde, suspected to have played a key role in the killing of the veteran Communist leader.As per the bail conditions, Mr. Tawde’s passport will be impounded and he cannot leave the State.Mr. Tawde, an ENT specialist who worked actively for the radical Hindu Janajagruti Samiti (a splinter group of the Goa-based Sanatan Sanstha) is prime accused in the 2013 murder of rationalist Dr. Narendra Dabholkar in Pune.He is now lodged in the high-security Yerwada Jail after the Additional Sessions Court in Pune quashed his bail plea in October last year.Expressing disappointment at Mr. Tawde being given bail, Megha Pansare, daughter-in-law of the deceased Communist leader, pointed to the slow pace of investigation, as Sarang Akolkar and Vinay Pawar, the two activists of the Sanatan Sanstha suspected to have carried out the actual shooting of Pansare are still to be arrested.“The SIT’s delay in nabbing Akolkar and Pawar is stalling the trial of the accused such as Sameer Gaikwad and Tawde. We urge the State government to have a dedicated team within the SIT to pursue the case, affected by frequent transfers,” Ms. Pansare told The Hindu.In June last year, the court, after three rejections, gave conditional bail to Sanatan Sanstha activist Sameer Gaikwad, prime accused in the Pansare murder case. Gaikwad was picked up from Sangli in September 2015, the first arrest in the Pansare case.The veteran Communist leader, along with his wife Uma, was shot outside their home in Kolhapur’s Sagar Mal locality on February 16, 2015. Mr. Pansare succumbed to his wounds four days later.last_img read more

SMC-Alab 5 notches 8th win in row

first_imgSlow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises Apart from imports Justin Brownlee and Renaldo Balkman, Alab also got significant contributions from their local crew led by Ray Parks.Brownlee fired 27 points, grabbed 13 rebounds and issued five assists on top of two steals, and four blocks while Balkman tallied 21 points and 14 rebounds.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting San Miguel Corporation-Alab Pilipinas sizzled for its highest scoring output in the Asean Basketball League as it dumped Taiwanese squad Formosa Dreamers, 117-93, Sunday night for its eighth straight victory at Santa Rosa Multipurpose Complex in Santa Rosa, Laguna.The Filipinos came out with all guns blazing in the opening period and refused to let up in the second half as they secured an 11th win in 15 games to close in on one of two outright semifinal slots.ADVERTISEMENT Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH MPBL: Munti faces unbeaten QC at home AFP official booed out of forum Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City View comments NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers MOST READ Read Next Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

10 months ago​AC Milan enquire about Fulham midfielder Johansen

first_img​AC Milan enquire about Fulham midfielder Johansenby Ansser Sadiq10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAC Milan are interested in signing Fulham midfielder Stefan Johansen.The 27-year-old was a key member of the team that won promotion under Slavisa Jokanovic last season.But the Norway skipper has only managed to start 4 Premier League games this term.The likes of Jean Michael Seri and Calum Chambers are ahead of him in the pecking order.Per Sky in Italy, Milan are looking to sign him this winter on a cut price deal – or on a free in the summer. TagsTransfersAbout the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Ohio State mens basketball faces judgement week against No 3 Michigan No

When Thad Matta was coaching at Xavier in 2004, the Musketeers had a three-game stretch against Mississippi State, Texas and Duke. Each of those teams was ranked in the top 11 of the Associated Press poll, with MSU (No. 4) and Duke (No. 5) placed in the top five. Those contests came in the NCAA Tournament, as Matta led Xavier to its first-ever appearance in the Elite Eight before losing a close one to the Blue Devils, 66-63. “It was crazy,” Matta said Monday, who left Xavier after that season to coach Ohio State. As treacherous a task as that was for Matta and his team, his current Buckeyes squad is staring down a two-game trek that might be even tougher than the one Xavier faced in 2004. OSU will play two top-three teams in a six-day span this week. And these upcoming bouts will come in the regular season, not in March when consecutive battles against elite programs are commonplace. OSU, ranked No. 10 in the most recent AP poll, is set to take on No. 3 Michigan in Ann Arbor Tuesday night. After squaring off against the Wolverines, the Buckeyes return home Sunday to play the No. 1 team in the country, Indiana. “It’s another week,” Matta said so sarcastically he cracked a smile before finishing the sentence. Matta’s players weren’t as light-hearted in talking about the venture ahead. “It’s why you come to Ohio State and play in a conference like the Big Ten, for weeks like this,” said junior guard Aaron Craft. The Buckeyes’ leading scorer, Deshaun Thomas, agreed, saying he “loves a challenge.” “I’m hyped,” the junior forward said, who leads the conference in scoring at 20 points per game. At 7-2 in the Big Ten, OSU is a game back of the Hoosiers, who are all alone in first place. The Buckeyes share a tie of second with Michigan and Michigan State. OSU is 1-1 against those teams this season, beating Michigan at home but losing to the Spartans on the road. Every team in the Big Ten plays 18 conference games, so no two-game stretch at the midway point is going to decide the league champion. But if OSU wants to stay alive and well in the race for a fourth consecutive regular season title, winning at least one game this week might be necessary. Thomas would love to win both. “It’s going to mean a lot for this team, especially if we get two wins against Michigan, they’re highly ranked. If we get a win against IU, we know we got to go down there and it’s going to be tough. It’s going to be big if we can get these two wins,” he said. This week also represents a turning point in the season for the Buckeyes. OSU (17-4) is exactly halfway through its conference schedule, and they’ll likely be tested much more in the second half of the year than they were in the first. During their first nine Big Ten games, the Buckeyes played five of the worst six teams in the league, and only three of the six best. OSU’s second half includes two games against No. 1 Indiana (20-2), trips to No. 3 Michigan (20-2) and unranked Wisconsin (15-7), and home games against No. 12 Michigan State (18-4) and No. 18 Minnesota (17-5). In his ninth year coaching in the Big Ten, Matta said the league is as competitive as he’s seen it. “I think that probably from top to bottom it’s as good – and we haven’t seen everybody yet – but seeing on tape, seeing scores, seeing the standings, I would probably agree (it’s as good as ever),” Matta said. For now, though, OSU is just focusing on the Wolverines. The Buckeyes gave Michigan its first loss on Jan. 13 with a 56-53 win, also preventing the Maize and Blue from ascending to a No. 1 national ranking. “To be honest, we haven’t even talked about Sunday’s game,” Matta said. “Obviously the mindset is on tomorrow night’s game, knowing that they have a great team.” Michigan, ranked No. 1 last week, dropped in the polls after losing at Indiana Saturday night. Add in the fact that OSU beat the Wolverines the first time around in Columbus, and Michigan will be ready Tuesday night, Craft said. “There is no way we can try to look past this game in any way,” Craft said. Getting out to a fast start in Ann Arbor will be crucial for the Buckeyes, Craft said. In Michigan’s two losses this season, they fell in a big hole early and couldn’t recover. OSU, 3-3 on the road this season, probably needs to at least stay even with the Wolverines (undefeated at home) early to have a chance for an upset. Doing that will require solid defense, something OSU has relied on all season. “Defensively I think we’re pretty sound,” Matta said. “We’re trying to get our guys to have a prideful mentality in terms of getting stops. We want to continue to get them to understand we have to have that for 40 minutes.” That won’t be easy against the Wolverines, who are led by a National Player of the Year candidate and Columbus native Trey Burke. The sophomore point guard has potentially the country’s best sidekick in junior guard Tim Hardaway Jr., who averages 15.6 points per game. Two freshmen, guard Nik Stauskas and forward Glenn Robinson III, also average double figures in points. OSU has played three teams this season currently ranked in the top 12 by the AP in No. 4 Duke, No. 5 Kansas and No. 12 MSU, not including Michigan. The Wolverines are likely the toughest team the Buckeyes have had to defend. “With the number of people they can put out there, the number of people that can score the ball, it’s really tough to play normal defense when you’re worried about the number of shooters they have,” Craft said. Defending Michigan’s shooters is just one of the many challenges OSU is facing in the week ahead. Matta said his team is as close to being ready for the daunting task as he’d like them to be. “We had two good practices. I’ve never had a team exactly where I wanted it. I do think we’re making strides. We just have to continue to find that consistency and every night we take the floor, we need our guys to play the best that we can,” the 45-year-old coach said. OSU and Michigan are scheduled to tipoff at 9 p.m. Tuesday night in the Crisler Center in Ann Arbor. The Buckeyes then take on Indiana at 1 p.m. Sunday in the Schottenstein Center. read more

Murkowski Votes No On Advancing Kavanaugh In Procedural Vote

first_imgOf the four key votes; Republican Senator Susan Collins of Maine and Jeff Flake of Arizona votes yes, as did democrat Joe Manchin of West Virginia. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享U.S. Senator Lisa Murkowski voted ‘no’ during a dramatic procedural vote held on the senate floor on  advancing Judge Brett Kavanaugh to a final vote. U.S. Senator Dan Sullivan voted ‘Yes’. Kavanaugh will get a final floor vote after enough senators Friday voted to advance his nomination. The final vote was  51 to 49.center_img The final confirmation vote will likely be held on Saturday.last_img read more

Kasilof River Sockeye Salmon Limits Increased

first_imgIn addition to increasing the bag and possession limit for sockeye salmon, ADF&G issued emergency order number 2-RS-1-36-19 expanding the area open to dipnetting on the Kasilof River effective 12:01 a.m. Wednesday, July 24 through 11:59 p.m. Wednesday, August 7, 2019. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) is increasing the bag and possession limit for sockeye salmon to six fish per day and twelve fish in possession; however, no more than two salmon per day and two in possession may be coho salmon, in all portions of the Kasilof River open to salmon fishing. Area Management Biologist Colton Lipka: “Increasing the limits for sockeye salmon allows anglers an opportunity to harvest additional fish to fill their freezer.” The biological escapement goal on the Kasilof River is 160,000-340,000 sockeye salmon. As of Sunday, July 21, 2019, a total of 231,900 sockeye salmon have passed the Kasilof River sonar site.center_img The current escapement of sockeye salmon into the Kasilof River is proceeding at a rate that is projected to exceed the biological escapement goal. These provisions are effective 12:01 a.m., Wednesday, July 24 through 11:59 p.m. Tuesday, December 31.last_img read more

Feet may be the key to hand evolution

first_imgImage: Wikimedia Commons. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In research reported in the journal Evolution, a team of scientists, led by Campbell Rolian from the University of Calgary, took extensive measurements of the feet and hands of chimpanzees (genetically, our closest relatives) and humans to try to find out how the extremities of our chimp-like ancestors might have evolved. They found there was a definite correlation between measurements of similar areas of the foot and hand, so for example if the big toe was long, the finger was also long. Dr Rolian speculated the correlation between toes and fingers may be because they share a similar genetic “blueprint”, so minor changes to the blueprint would affect both hands and feet.Once they had the anatomical measurements, the team used the data to create a mathematical simulation of the evolution of the hands and feet from those of our chimp-like ancestors to humans. The model simulated the evolutionary pressures and changed the shape of the feet or hands in small increments to see what effects the changes would have. They discovered that changes made to the feet also caused corresponding changes to the hands, particularly in the relative lengths of fingers and toes, and Dr Rolian said these changes may have allowed the hands of early hominins, including Neanderthals, the dexterity required to use stone tools.The scientists say the capacity to walk upright on two feet is linked intrinsically to the emergence of the use of stone tools. Dr Rolian said the findings go “back to Darwin’s The Descent of Man,” since Darwin was one of the first scientists to consider there might be a link between walking upright and using stone tools. But Darwin’s idea was that bipedalism evolved first, and this freed the hands, which could then be used for purposes other than locomotion, while Rolian’s work suggests they evolved together.Professor Robin Crompton at Liverpool University in the UK, said the feet and hands of chimpanzees may not necessarily be good models for those of human ancestors, and suggested the extremities of lowland gorillas may be more “interesting” in this respect. He also said the shape and biomechanics of hands and feet were more complex than simple anatomical measurements might suggest.Professor Crompton is head of the university’s Primate Evolution and Morphology Research Group. His research has found that orang-utans, which are tree dwellers, are more like modern humans in bipedal walking than the chimpanzees, and his work suggests bipedalism may even have arisen as early as 24 million years ago. © 2010 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — Scientists in Canada have used a mathematical model to simulate the evolution from an ape-like hand to the modern-day human hand, and discovered that changes in our fingers and hands developed in parallel changes in our toes and feet. Explore further Citation: Feet may be the key to hand evolution (2010, January 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-01-feet-key-evolution.html More information: THE CO-EVOLUTION OF HUMAN HANDS AND FEET, Evolution, DOI:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00944.x Early human ancestors had a wobble in their walklast_img read more

You will snap over 25000 selfies in your lifetime

first_imgIf you belong to the millennials’ club ­—those born after 1980s – and continue your love with selfies till you grow old, you will have a collection of over 25,000 selfies during your lifetime, an interesting research has revealed.According to a new survey conducted by Luster Premium White, a global maker of teeth-whitening products, 95 per cent of people have taken at least one selfie, the Daily Mail reported. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’As the selfie frequency goes up, they could end up taking an average of 25,676 self-portrait during their lifetime.‘Even a brief glance at a Facebook page, a Twitter feed or Instagram account confirms that millennials are dedicated to chronicling their lives with selfies, and they especially enjoy sharing them with their network of acquaintances,’ Damon Brown, CEO and co-founder of Luster Premium White, was quoted as saying. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe survey included 1,000 Americans. ‘Beyond just millennials, most people now take selfies while on vacation or while celebrating to chronicle special moments with friends and family,’ Brown added.About 63 per cent of millennials said that a vacation trip is the most popular place to snap a selfie.More than half of the sample admitted that they fix their hair before taking a photo of themselves, and 53 per cent of them said they check themselves out in the mirror, the survey added.last_img read more