Donegal liquor company in Good Spirits for Philadelphia showcase

first_imgDonegal-based Muff Liquor Company is one of two North West companies in Philadelphia this week to take part in a prestigious Irish American Chamber of Commerce (IACC) Craft Drinks event. Muff Liquor Company from Donegal and Derry-based Baronscourt Brewing Company will showcase their products as well as connecting with drinks distributors and business leaders with a view to expanding their networks into the Greater Philadelphia region.The companies will travel along with representatives from the Local Enterprise Office in Donegal and Derry City and Strabane District Council to participate in the prestigious “In Good Spirits” event, following an invitation from the Chamber of Commerce in Philadelphia. The event is part of the strategic Ireland Northwest initiative between Donegal County Council and Derry City and Strabane District Council and their partners to develop in-market support for local companies to help them build relationships to support the development of export opportunities.The Councils have been working closely with the IACC and Pennsylvania Department of Community & Economic Development to promote the North West region and are delighted that Muff and Baronscourt Liquor can avail of the unique opportunity to further develop their exports into the US market.The two local companies will be joined at the event by Teeling Whiskey, Drioglann Local Measc Distillery, as well as distillers from Philadelphia.The “In Good Spirits” event will feature a panel discussion and question and answer session moderated by Terese Waldron, Director of Graduate Food Marketing Program at Saint Joseph’s University. There will be drinks experts from  Pennsylvania and Irish industry taking part including, Eve-Anne McCarron, Local Enterprise Office, Donegal, responsible for The Food Coast Initiative); John Teeling of Teeling Whiskey; Andrew Auwerda, President & Co-Founder of Philadelphia Distilling and John Cooper, Co-Founder of Mountain Laurel Spirits (Dad’s Hat Rye).The panel discussion will be followed by a tasting session featuring The Muff Liquor Company, Teeling Whiskey, Baronscourt Brewing Co., Lough Mask Distillery, Powers Irish Whiskey, Dad’s Hat Rye Whiskey, and Manatawny Still Works. The participants will get an opportunity to pitch their products and meet with industry experts who will assist the companies seeking market entry and develop local partnerships.Head of Enterprise in Donegal, Michael Tunney said the visit highlighted two important strands of their strategy in Donegal – the continued support to make Donegal famous for food and the emphasis on helping small businesses from the county to look beyond local markets.“We have an amazing cohort of businesses in Donegal and we are working hard now with our businesses to find out what really drives the people who are exporting so we can help others achieve that too.“This trip is just one part of that strategy and we are confident that the links we have been forging over the past few years in places like Philadelphia, Boston and New York through the Diaspora project will bear fruit for businesses here.” Welcoming Derry City and Strabane District Council’s participation in the event, Director of Business Stephen Gillespie said the visit is part of the Ireland Northwest’s strategic objectives, aimed at assisting local companies to internationalise their business, increase their business connections and exports.A key element of this visit is that it aligns with the objectives set out in the recently launched Council food and drink strategy.“This is a great opportunity for Baronscourt Brewing Co. and Muff Liquor Company to showcase their products and further develop their links with drink distributors in the US.“It’s a huge privilege for us to be invited to take part in this prestigious event and to be given a platform to promote the North West region as a food and drink destination. “The event will be attended by a range of influencers in the drinks sector and our participation at this showcase is a testament to the ongoing relationship we have developed with Philadelphia during our trade investment visits,” he said.Alanna M. Barry McCloskey, Business Manager and Marketing Coordinator with the Irish American Business Chamber and Network said: “On behalf of the Board of Directors of the Irish American Business Chamber & Network, we are thrilled to welcome a delegation of Irish craft distillers and brewers and representatives from Derry City and Strabane and Donegal County Councils.“Our visiting companies will meet with various Chamber members, local business leaders, and government representatives with the goal of expanding their networks and expanding into the Greater Philadelphia region.“We are very much looking forward to introducing our visiting companies to the Irish Chamber membership at a special event, In Good Spirits: The Rise of Craft Distilling and Brewing in Pennsylvania and Ireland. This panel discussion and tasting session will feature both Irish and Pennsylvania companies and highlight the parallel track of the craft industries in Pennsylvania and Ireland.“Throughout the Chamber’s 20-year history, we have welcomed delegations of Irish companies and government representatives to the Philadelphia Region.“We actively work to promote the Island of Ireland in the Philadelphia region and conversely, highlight Philadelphia as a destination for Irish businesses, trade and investment.”The delegation departed to Philadelphia on Wednesday 15th May.Further trade missions are scheduled to take place to both Boston and Philadelphia in November when both Councils will be supporting a range of local companies to assess their readiness to export and gear up to target and explore new business opportunities in export markets.Donegal liquor company in Good Spirits for Philadelphia showcase was last modified: May 16th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Santa Clara re-releases Reuben Foster video with unredacted audio

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos or video on a mobile deviceSANTA CLARA — Officials on Tuesday released a second version of police body-camera video from an Oct. 12 domestic dispute with former San Francisco 49ers linebacker Reuben Foster and the girlfriend behind his infamous legal troubles, after deciding the initial disclosure by Santa Clara police improperly redacted an audio portion of officers’ conversations.Police swiftly pushed back at the implication, and …last_img read more

Saving albatross, on sea and land

first_imgA black-browed albatross caring for itschick. Albatrosses are attentive parents, with breeding behaviour adapted to empty and safe islands. They therefore have no evolutionary defence against insidious new threats, introduced by people, such as predatory mice. While mice eat their chicks alive, the albatross parents sit by with no sense of their chicks’ plight. (Image: Save the Albatross Campaign) A northern royal albatross in flight near its colony in Taiaroa Head, New Zealand. Albatrosses range over huge areas of ocean, spending over half their lives in flight and regularly circling the globe. (Image: Wikimedia) An infant albatross with deep wounds inflicted by mice. Gough Island in the Southern Atlantic Ocean has a population of some 1-million mice, with devastating effects for the large ocean birds that breed there. (Image strictly copyright Ross Wanless. This image may not be republished or redistributed in any way.) A mouse on Gough Island with the remains of its much larger prey, a petrel chick. (Image strictly copyright Ross Wanless. This image may not be republished or redistributed in any way.)Jennifer SternWith a wingspan greater than the height of the tallest man and over half their lives spent in flight over the seas, albatrosses have a special place in the human imagination. But these great birds, evolved to fill a unique evolutionary niche, are under threat from both huge fishing fleets and the smallest of predators.Albatrosses wander the southern seas skimming the ocean rollers for years at a time. They occasionally land on the water to sleep but, it is thought, can actually catch a few winks while flying. No-one knows for sure, but scientists think that on long flights they may, like dolphins, transport themselves using one hemisphere of their brain, while sleeping with the other.On their long flights albatrosses feed on marine carrion, as well as krill and other sea-surface creatures. Their eyesight is good, but not much use for finding food over the featureless ocean – at least not until they’re almost on top of their lunch. They also dip their feet into the sea to test the temperature and somehow use the information to find out whether there’s a meal in the vicinity.Their most effective sense is smell, as most of their food is dead and floating on the surface. Albatrosses fly enormous distances to find small patches of food scattered over a vast area. This may be the remains of a dead whale, a patch of krill associated with upwelling, a plankton bloom, or even a spawning event.Animals such as squid all spawn together over a short period and then, conveniently for the albatrosses, die en masse, floating to the surface. The albatrosses’ food-finding instincts have served the bird well for millennia, but in the last hundred years or so things have changed.Deadly baitThe last century has seen a revolution in commercial fishing. Refrigeration now allows huge fleets to travel far across the sea, catching and processing enormous numbers of fish. The once-empty southern oceans are now densely populated with trawlers and long-line fishing boats. Unfortunately, these almost exactly replicate the feeding conditions of albatrosses, and other sea feeders such as petrels.Long-line boats lay enormously long fishing lines with baited hooks out the back of the vessel. The lines and bait, which is not exactly at its freshest, float on the surface, sending out deliciously attractive olfactory signals to passing albatrosses.The birds fly down and, as they have done for thousands of years, snatch the morsel from the sea surface. But that morsel is attached to a hook, so the bird is snared, dragged behind the boat, and drowned.It’s estimated that long-line fishing kills more than 100 000 albatrosses a year. That’s one every five minutes. Two albatrosses will have been dragged to a cold and lonely death by the time you have finished reading this article.Fishing trawlers are also deadly to the birds. Trawling nets are enormous – about 50m in length and filled with up to 20 tons of fish on a successful drag. As the net surfaces it is pulled to the boat, and the catch comes within reach of albatrosses and other birds – a veritable feast. The birds may survive a nibble or two, but eventually they get tangled in the net, dragged underwater, and drowned.The upshot is that the great bird’s numbers are declining at an alarming rate, with 19 of the 22 species of albatross listed in the Red Data Book, a global compendium of threatened and endangered species of plants and animals, compiled by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources.Safe on land?But it’s not only at sea that albatrosses are threatened. They breed almost exclusively on empty oceanic islands, so they have evolved in an unthreatening environment. They are totally safe in the air and, before commercial fishing, were virtually unthreatened in the water – although they could get nabbed by an opportunistic seal or shark.In 2001 a group of ornithologists spent a year on Gough Island, a cold volcanic island rising from the South Atlantic Ocean at a midpoint between the southern tips of Africa and South America and the northern coast of Antarctica. They made it a priority to find out how well the albatrosses were breeding, given the birds’ severe mortality at sea.The scientists counted the pairs of incubating adults in January and, after hatching, in September counted the surviving chicks. The figures were frightening.Expecting a 60% to 70% breeding success, they were horrified to find it was closer to 30%. More than half the chicks had died. And they had no idea why – although they had a few suspicions.Ross Wanless, a PhD candidate from South Africa’s University of Cape Town, spent a year on Gough from October 2003 to September 2004 to find out what was happening to the chicks. The potential suspects included some kind of disease, poor feeding conditions, the high mortality of adults at sea – causing abandonment of the chicks – or, perhaps, predation by mice.Mice are not indigenous to Gough. Albatrosses evolved to breed on land entirely free of terrestrial predators so, with no natural land enemies, they have no natural land defences. The odd skua may drop in to steal eggs or chicks but the albatrosses could deal with that. They’d see them flying in and, with a good deal of squawking and wing flapping, see them off in a typically avian fashion.For thousands of years there were no mammals – and certainly no humans – on the birds’ breeding islands. But everything changed with the arrival of people.People came with passengers, small companions that had a huge impact on the delicate ecosystems of the southern islands. In 1949 five domestic cats were brought to Marion Island to deal with a mouse problem at the meteorological station. But the cats found burrowing petrels tastier than mice, and their numbers exploded. By 1977 there were 3 400 cats on the island, threatening to drive the birds to extinction. The resulting eradication programme, started in 1982, only managed to remove all cats from Marion by the early 1990s.Gough Island is home to an estimated 1-million mice. Cute, harmless little creatures, one would think.Wanless found otherwise. Like his predecessors, he counted the incubating adult pairs as a basis from which to measure breeding success. But about a month after the chicks had hatched, he began to find bloodied, dead and dying little albatross fluffballs.The mice were, literally, eating the chicks alive, sometimes taking up to a week to finish one off. And all the while the parents would sit there, unaware that their chicks needed help. They had no evolutionary reference for that kind of threat.Save the Albatross CampaignIts lifetime of lonely voyaging makes the albatross resonate in human culture. It’s an agent of karma in Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner and, even, material for Monty Python. The opened wings of the great albatrosses are the widest of any bird, extending over 3.4 metres (11 feet) – a span far larger than the height of the tallest man. They are magnificent birds, and something had to be done.The Save the Albatross Campaign (STAC) is an international organisation set up to find ways to end the breeding and feeding threats to the great bird. One of its priorities is vermin control, with the mice of Gough Island soon to go the way of the cats of Marion Island.The campaign also works with the fishing industry to find an answer to the problem of “by-catch” – a euphemism for animals inadvertently killed in the efficient process of commercial fishing.The solutions are win-win because fishing boats actually do want to only catch fish, not albatrosses, which have no commercial value. Stopping albatrosses from taking bait will reduce fishing companies’ wastage, and improve their bottom line. STAC works at the levels of both the big fishing commissions, or Regional Fishing Management Organisations (RFMOs), and individual crews and fishing companies.On the big scale, the campaign’s objective is to get RFMOs to acknowledge the problem, and take action. There has been good progress. The next step is the mandatory inclusion of mitigation measures in long-line and trawling fleets. These would include setting lines at night when albatrosses don’t feed, making the long-line bait sink quickly so the birds can’t get to it, and bird-scaring lines. The last are, in effect, marine scarecrows – long lines with scary, noisy, fluttering streamers set out before the lines or nets are laid. The birds find them terrifying, and keep away.Scaring lines are another win-win part of the campaign. With STAC’s help, previously unemployed people in Ocean View in Cape Town have started small businesses to make the bird-scaring lines. STAC then buys the lines, and gives them to the fishing boats for free.Unlike dolphin-friendly labelling on tuna tins, there is currently no labelling system for albatross-friendly seafood. But if you want to help save the albatross, look out for the logo of the Marine Stewardship Council on any seafood you buy. This organisation certifies responsible fisheries, with bird-friendliness one of its criteria.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Mary Alexander at marya@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.Related articlesBoulders penguins’ promised landLooking out for South Africa’s sea life Saving our vulnerable sharksUseful linksSave the Albatross Campaign Birdlife South AfricaInternational Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources Southern African Sustainable Seafood initiativeMarine Stewardship Councillast_img read more

Day 1 at Building Science Summer Camp

first_imgThe Best and the Brightest Meet Every Year to Talk Green BuildingWhat did I do for summer vacation? I went to camp, met with our advisory team, learned about physics, ate food from Alaska, Dallas, Miami, and Maine. And there were Cubans with cigars, too.Building science summer camp is an information and consumption festival hosted by Building Science Corporation during the first week of August each year. Officially called the Westford Symposium on Building Science, the by-invitation-only summer camp attracts the best and the brightest in the commercial and residential building fields. There is also very good food, beer, wine, and cigars.Classes are held during the day at the Westford (Mass.) Regency Hotel and Conference Center. Networking and feasting opportunities occur at the clubhouse each night. The classes are taught by whoever Joe Lstiburek, Ph.D., one of the founders of Building Science Corporation, wants to invite. Typically these teachers are among the best in their fields. This year was no different.Each day opens with a rundown of the menu by the chef, Pete Consigli.Summer camp participants do their best to out-do each other each year with their native cuisines. The Alaskans bring halibut and salmon, the Texans bring a steer and slow-roast the brisket, and then there’s the North Carolina barbeque, the Maine clams and mussels, etc. Consigli’s opening comments this year: “The food at summer camp can be summed up three ways: best quality, huge variety, and a hell of a lot of it.”Even smart people get confused.Lstiburek likes to say that he’s not a consultant, he’s an insultant. Anton TenWolde, Ph.D., added another layer to the title game: confusant.After recently retiring from the USDA Forest Products Lab, physicist TenWolde discovered that the stuff he thought he knew he may not know so well. His eyes lit up when someone raised a hand during his presentation and said, “I’m confused.”There’s a lot to learn from the stuff TenWolde doesn’t know. Here’s what I learned:A lot of water in houses comes from people, but it isn’t all from respiration (breathing). A lot can come from transpiration (sweating) too—up to 3 lb. of water per day per person. Coupled with respiration, a family of five dumps up to 33 gal. of water into a house every day.Foundations add a lot of water to a house, too: 0.4 kG per sq. m. per day (about a gal. per 44 sq. ft.) evaporate from bare soil in a crawl space.It takes six weeks for a sliver of wood to come to moisture equilibrium with its surroundings. And then Lew Harriman asked if we could all underline that in our notes: SIX WEEKS for a teeny piece of wood to come to equilibrium with its environment through ‘sorption. So the oak flooring probably ought to be in the room for more than a couple of days before installation.Houses can be a huge part of the solution to our energy problem. Ren Anderson works at the National Renewable Energy Lab and is interested in Net Zero Energy Houses. It’s pretty well known that we can use a lot less power in houses. On Day 1 at camp he talked a lot about the challenge of syncing up local power generation with grid demands. Many houses can generate a lot of power with photovoltaics (PV), but can they provide electricity to the grid when the grid needs it most—during the hot part of the day when everyone flips on the AC?I learned that:Today’s houses are much bigger than houses from the ’50s.Today’s houses use much more energy.While today’s big houses use less energy per square foot, it’s total energy use that’s important because we don’t make power by the square foot, but by the kilowatt.Small houses are more efficient at space heating than large houses; small houses use a smaller percentage of total energy for space heating.Large houses get better RESNET scores than small houses because RESNET is based on performance per square foot. For this reason, RESNET (and Energy Star) is biased toward larger houses (but the Energy Star bias may be changing).It is very cost effective to slash home energy use by 50%. The second 50%, to get to zero energy, is less cost effective at current energy prices. If energy prices go up (which they may), higher efficiencies will be very cost effective too.PV panels on houses can provide peak power to the grid if the panels are turned to face west rather than south, because their generation curve will be shifted an hour or two later in the day—just when the grid needs electricity.Eighty percent of the houses in America are built by 20% of the builders. Production builders risk going the way of GM if they don’t lead the world in energy efficiency.At the clubhouse, I learned that more and more regional green-building programs, such as Earth Craft House from Atlanta and Earth Advantage from Oregon, are expanding. Earth Craft is in six southeastern states and Earth Advantage is moving toward New England. This may mean that the big national programs need to get their acts together and start making sense.—Dan Morrison is managing editor of GreenBuildingAdvisor.com.last_img read more

Apple patents wearable battery charger for Watch 2

first_imgWhy IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Tags:#Apple#Apple Watch#battery#smartwatch#wearable Related Posts Apple might be looking for a new way to improve the Watch 2 battery life, if a patent published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office this month is to be believed.The patent shows two possible designs for a wearable battery charger, one that is embedded into the wristband and another that sits underneath the chassis. The charger would provide Watch 2 users with a few hours extra, before it needs to be recharged.See Also: Apple confirms rumored interest in self-driving cars in letter to regulatorsFor the second design, which sits underneath the chassis, the company plans to use ‘heat-dissipating’ circuitry to ensure the battery doesn’t burn users.Promoted versus performance on battery lifeApple promotes 18 hours of battery life for the Watch 2, but users will know the results vary wildly depending on how much time you spend on the watch. Most reviewers of the Watch 2 said it managed 6-7 hours of screen-on time with heavy usage.The wearable charger looks to be a way for Apple to appeal to power users, while not making the Watch 2 (or Watch 3) any thicker. The Watch 2 is already thicker than the original smartwatch.Consumers have referenced the poor battery life over the two years as one of the main reasons they stopped using the smartwatch. Apple is looking to address these complaints with the next Watch series, set to come out sometime this year.Even with the patent published, it is still way too early to say if the iPhone maker intends to launch a wearable charger for the Watch. Apple publishes hundreds of patents every year, and many end up unused. Follow the Puckcenter_img David Curry Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You… How Myia Health’s Partnership with Mercy Virtua…last_img read more

Fadnavis committed to luring leaders Pawar

first_imgPune: Nationalist Congress Party chief Sharad Pawar on Sunday accused Maharashtra Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis and other BJP ministers of “committing themselves” to poaching leaders from other parties before the assembly election.Pawar also accused the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party of misusing probe agencies and state-run financial bodies to compel leaders to join their fold. “The chief minister and other ministers in the state government have literally committed themselves to this work (luring leaders of other parties). They are making phone calls to leaders of other parties and asking them to join,” the NCP president said. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’Citing an example of the alleged misuse of financial bodies, he said: “The sugar mill of (former MLA) Kalyan Kale in Pandharpur was in a difficult situation. The state government, by flouting norms, gave Rs 30-35 crore to it and asked him to join the BJP. Since he wanted to save his factory, he switched over.” Pawar claimed that NCP state women’s president Chitra Wagh, who had announced last Friday that she was quitting the party, was also forced to join the BJP by way of threats. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&K”Wagh met me. She looked worried,” Pawar said. “She told me that there are some criminal cases against her husband. In addition to that, an ACB (anti corruption bureau) inquiry has been initiated against their cooperative institution. That is why she asked me to give her permission to join the BJP,” he said. Pawar alleged that Kagal NCP MLA Hasan Mushrif was also made an offer by the BJP, but when he refused, the income tax department carried out raids at his premises in Kolhapur. Pawar added that Satara MLA Shivendraraje Bhosle and Ahmednagar MLA Sangram Jagtap are with the NCP.last_img read more

Quebec court authorizes class action against Air Canada by former Aveos employees

first_imgMONTREAL – Former Aveos employees have been authorized to proceed with a class action lawsuit against Air Canada.The airline could have to pay more than $100 million if found guilty, lawyers for the plaintiffs said in a statement Tuesday after a Quebec Superior Court justice gave the green light to the legal action.Aveos used to be a subsidiary of Air Canada whose 1,800 employees conducted maintenance work on the airline’s fleet in three centres located in Montreal, Winnipeg and Vancouver.Air Canada sold most of its shares in Aveos in 2007 and then proceeded to gradually reduce its contracts with the maintenance company, forcing it to close permanently in 2012 due to lack of orders.The law that privatized Air Canada in 1988 obliged the airline, however, to keep its maintenance operations in the country.Previous decisions by Superior Court and the Quebec Court of Appeal ruled in favour of the Aveos employees and state Air Canada violated the law.The class action also claims the airline acted in bad faith by deliberately provoking the closure of Aveos.A spokesperson for Air Canada said the company would not comment as the matter is before the courts, and added the airline’s position will be made public during the legal proceedings.(Companies in this story: TSX:AC)Note to readers: This is a corrected version. A previous story said Air Canada was privatized in 1998last_img read more