Former Attorney General dies

first_imgFormer Attorney General of Guyana, Justice Mohamed Shahahbuddeen, died early Saturday morning in Toronto, Canada, after a brief period of illness, leaving behind an illustrious career.The late Justice Mohamed ShahabuddeenJustice Shahabuddeen, 81, will be remembered for his distinguished service as an eminent Judge of the International Court of Justice, a lawyer, public servant, politician and diplomat.In 1953, he graduated for the University of London with a Bachelor of Law. In 1958 he earned his Master of Law, in 1970 he earned his Doctor of Philosophy and in 1986 the title of Doctor of Law.Justice Mohamed Shahabuddeen began his public service as a Magistrate before joining the Chamber of the Attorney General in 1959. In 1962 he was appointed Solicitor General, a post he held until 1973 when he was elevated to the position of Attorney General, serving in that capacity from 1978 to 1987. In 1983 he was appointed Deputy Prime Minister and Vice President of Guyana.From 1988 to 1997 he served as a Judge of the International Court of Justice in The Hague, the first from the Commonwealth Caribbean to be accorded this signal honour. Subsequently, he was Judge and twice Vice President of the Yugoslavia Tribunal until 2009. In addition, he has been an Arbiter in the International Criminal Court, also in The Hague since 1997, and the Centre for International Arbitration in Cairo. In January 2009, he was chosen as a Judge of the International Criminal Court.Justice Mohamed Shahabuddeen authored several books, including The Legal System of Guyana (Georgetown, 1973); Constitutional Development in Guyana, 1621-1978 (Georgetown, 1978); Nationalisation of Guyana Bauxite (1981) and From Plantocracy to Nationalisation (1983).In recognition of the distinction and eminence achieved by him, he was awarded by the Government of Guyana the Order of Excellence in 1988, the Order of Roraima in 1980 and the Cacique’s Crown of Honour in 1970.According to his biography on The Integrationist Caribbean, “To perceive Justice Shahabuddeen as a mere legal luminary is an injustice to one who has made a major impact on his discipline, on the public life of the region and on the regional and international stages.”Meanwhile, President David Granger in a statement later on Saturday extended heartfelt sympathy to the family and loved ones of the late Justice Mohamed Shahahbuddeen, especially his children Faud, Sieyf and Shalisa.last_img read more

Profits, outlook well in the black for Netflix

first_img160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SAN FRANCISCO – Netflix Inc. on Wednesday posted the highest first-quarter profit in its eight-year history, but the online DVD rental pioneer’s performance flopped on Wall Street. Investors turned their thumbs down largely because Netflix had trouble attracting and retaining subscribers amid stiffer competition from Blockbuster Inc. during the first three months of the year. To make matters worse, Netflix management warned its service may continue to be upstaged by Blockbuster through the remainder of the year. As a result, Netflix expects to finish 2007 with 600,000 to 700,000 fewer customers than the Los Gatos-based company had projected when the year began. Those dreary developments overshadowed Netflix’s first-quarter profit of $9.9 million, or 14 cents per share, during the first three months of the year. That more than doubled from net income of $4.4 million, or 7 cents per share, at the same time last year. Revenue rose 36 percent from last year to $305.3 million. The earnings fell 2 cents below the average estimate among analysts surveyed by Thomson Financial, one of the reasons that Netflix Chief Financial Officer Barry McCarthy described the showing as the most disappointing quarter since the company went public in May 2002. McCarthy expressed his dismay during a Wednesday conference call. The letdown punished Netflix’s stock, which plunged $2.26, or 9.4 percent, to close Wednesday at $21.70 on the Nasdaq Stock Market. Netflix tried to bolster its shares by announcing plans to buy back $100 million worth of stock through the rest of the year. This is hardly the first time that investors have gotten queasy about Netflix’s prospects. Similar doubts arose in 2003 when Wal-Mart Stores Inc. entered the online DVD industry, a threat that evaporated last year when the world’s largest retailer handed off its subscribers to Netflix. last_img read more