David Warner downed by friendly fire in Darwin squad match

first_imgAustralia opening batsman David Warner was a victim of friendly fire when he was struck in the neck by a bouncer from team mate Josh Hazlewood and retired hurt during an intra-squad match in Darwin on Tuesday.The pugnacious left-hander dropped his bat and slumped to his knees after his attempted hook shot went awry at Marrara Oval but quickly picked himself up and walked off the ground unassisted.Vice-captain Warner was dismissed for four in the first innings and had only made two from 14 balls when he was struck, denying him time in the middle before Australia’s two-Test tour of Bangladesh.Cricket Australia tweeted that he was “recovering” from the blow, without elaborating on his condition.The squad depart for Bangladesh on Friday ahead of the first Test in Dhaka which starts on August 27.last_img read more

Diana Shipping Fixes Kamsarmax Bulker with Glencore

first_imgGreek dry bulk owner Diana Shipping has entered into a time charter contract with Rotterdam-based Glencore Agriculture for one of its Kamsarmax vessels.Under the agreement, the company’s 82,193 dwt Maia would work at a gross charter rate of USD 13,300 per day for a period until minimum January 1, 2020 up to maximum March 31, 2020.Diana Shipping expects the employment to generate around USD 5.44 million of gross revenue for the minimum scheduled period of the time charter.The 2009-built bulker’s charter commenced on November 12. Maia was previously chartered at a rate of USD 10,125 per day.last_img read more

Supreme Court Rules For Texas Redistricting Plans

first_img Listen Share J. David Ake/APThe sun flares in the camera lens as it rises behind the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington.In a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court said that Texas’ legislative and congressional maps are not a racial gerrymander and that all districts are OK, except for one, which it determined is a racial gerrymander — House District 90.“Except with respect to one Texas House district, we hold that the court below erred in effectively enjoining the use of the districting maps adopted by the Legislature in 2013,” conservative Justice Samuel Alito wrote in the majority opinion.In a one-page concurrence, joined by Neil Gorsuch, Clarence Thomas — one of the most conservative (in philosophy and use of words) justices — reiterated his view that Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act “does not apply to redistricting,” per SCOTUSBlog.Justice Sonia Sotomayor, joined by the court’s liberals, wrote a scathing 46-page dissent. (That is five pages longer than the majority opinion.)“The Court today goes out of its way to permit the State of Texas to use maps that the three-judge District Court unanimously found were adopted for the purpose of preserving the racial discrimination that tainted its previous maps,” she wrote.MORE: Teddy Rave of UH Law Center Discusses Latest SCOTUS Rulings X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /14:25last_img read more

Screening of The Accidental Prime Minister cancelled in Kolkata

first_imgKolkata: The screening of “The Accidental Prime Minister” was on Friday cancelled at a Kolkata theatre due to security reasons amid protest demonstrations by youth Congress activists, police said. The film, directed by Vijay Ratnakar Gutte, released on Friday. It is based on a book with the same title written by Sanjaya Baru, who was media advisor to Manmohan Singh when he was Prime Minister. Baru’s book was published on April 20, 2014. Also Read – 3 injured, flight, train services hit as rains lash BengalActor Anupam Kher portrays the role of Singh while Akshaye Khanna stars as Baru. According to the viewers at the Hind Cinema near central Kolkata’s Chandni Chowk area, the show was cancelled after screening for just 10 minutes on its opening day. “The afternoon screening of ‘The Accidental Prime Minister’ has been cancelled due to security reasons. There was an agitation by a certain group outside the hall,” a senior officer of Kolkata Police said told IANS. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killed However, he could not confirm whether the next shows of the film will be screened as scheduled. State youth Congress leadership claimed the content and the title of the film is derogatory towards Singh and other senior leaders of Congress and demanded that the film be banned. “The tile of the film itself is derogatory. What did the filmmaker want to imply by calling Manmohan Singh an accidental prime minister? Close to 100 activists of youth Congress in Kolkata protested in front of the theatre. It is good the screening has been stopped,” Bengal Youth Congress President Shadab Khan told IANS. Asked whether forcing to cancel the screening of a film can be termed as violation of freedom of speech, the leader said sentiments of the party workers have been hurt by the film. “The agitation was held as the sentiments of our activists were hurt. However, we are not planning any other agitations here as of now,” he added.last_img read more

Crazy Insane Startups Are This Tech Investors Meat and Potatoes

first_img 5 min read Bryan Johnson, a serial tech entrepreneur turned investor, isn’t interested in finding the next buzzy startup like messaging app Snapchat. Sure, he hopes to make money. But unlike many venture capitalists, he doesn’t seek to underwrite frivolous companies whose biggest innovation is getting more people to click on ads. Johnson is instead attracted to ideas that seem insane and impossible.“I want to get a company from ‘crazy’ to ‘viable,’” Johnson told Fortune. “With today’s technology, we can now create in days, weeks or months what previous generations couldn’t do in a lifetime. Where DaVinci could sketch, we can build. Yet, we don’t have sufficient resources and people pursuing these goals.”On Monday, Johnson, who is best known as a founder of online payment processing company Braintree, announced that he has created a $100 million fund to invest in startups working on outlandish projects.He has already invested $15 million in seven startups. Planetary Resources, one of those companies, wants to spark an interstellar gold rush by mining asteroids for precious metals. Another called Vicarious wants to build a computer system that learns like the human brain. Human Longevity aims to lengthen the human life span to 120 years. Meanwhile, Matternet is fine-tuning a new kind of $3,000 drone for emerging markets and third-world countries.For every startup Johnson funds, he turns away many more — at least 95% of the ones he sees.“I invest in entrepreneurs who understand generally where the world is going, the enormous power of their tools and the enormous stakes that we have,” he says.In Matternet’s case, the Palo Alto startup certainly didn’t invent drones, but the company may be the first targeting the developing world. “You can’t get critical supplies to parts of Africa and Asia today — the roads are just too bad,” explains Johnson.Matternet CEO Andreas Raptopoulous contends people who will benefit most from drones won’t be Amazon customers (sorry, Jeff Bezos), but those who need food, medicine and other basic necessities in hard-to-reach places like Bhutan, where Matternet has already experimented with a prototype capable of traveling 15 miles carrying 4.4 lbs. of cargo. A 7.5 mile drive from Bhutan’s capital of Thimpu to a remote spot takes a car between 1 and 4 hours depending on weather and road conditions, but a Matternet drone accomplished the same trip in 14 minutes.Promising as ventures like Matternet are, Johnson recognizes he’s taking a serious risk as an investor. There’s little-to-no guarantee any of the startups he invests in will make it big. “It’s much harder to vet the likelihood of these companies than it is a web startup,” he admits. “You may have a 1 in 10 hit rate for someone building software for something. Here, you have a hit rate of 1 in 100 or 1 in 1,000.”That Johnson is plowing ahead anyway isn’t surprising to those who know him well. By the time he was nine, Johnson showed a penchant for exploration, traipsing the woods in and around Springville, Utah, where he grew up.“I think it’s the culmination of what he’s been working for his whole life,” says Candace Mouritsen, Johnson’s sister and an early employee at several of her brother’s startups.Rather than chase after his own interstellar dreams, Johnson became an entrepreneur. Two startups, including an Internet voice business, went bust by 2003. Two or three years later, Johnson drummed up the idea for a credit card processing system aimed at high-tech merchants. The smartphone market was in its infancy, and the credit industry then was plagued with what Johnson calls “unscrupulous” competitors.So he left his job working in a strategy group at Sears and started Braintree. Six years later, Braintree was processing $12 billion a year in payments from clients including Uber, Airbnb and OpenTable. The business was doing well enough such that suitors came knocking, and in the fall of 2013, PayPal acquired Braintree for $800 million.Now Johnson plans to use $100 million of his own cash for OS Fund, a name he coined that refers to the technical term “operating system.” Kitschy as it may sound to some, he wants to invest in startups developing products and services that radically improve quality of life. So when Johnson refers to the OS Fund, he’s not talking about some computer operating system, but what he dubs the “operating system of life.”If his investments seem unusual and far-flung, it’s with reason: Johnson avoids startups that are more bent on commercial success than addressing deeper societal challenges. And if Johnson comes across as downright eccentric because of his fund, so be it. He’ll also be in good company for now, joining a group of forward-thinkers behind Tesla, the high-performance electric carmaker, and Google’s research lab Google X, known for working on sci-fi projects like self-driving cars and glucose-tracking contact lenses.“I think the winds will shift,” Johnson says. “There will be a shift in the kinds of things people aspire to do. Funding and supporting hard problems will become cool in a company in a couple of years.”Spoken like a true futurist. Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global This story originally appeared on Fortune Magazine Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. October 20, 2014last_img read more