Half-time: Burnley 1 Brentford 0

first_imgBrentford trailed at the break at Turf Moor to a Michael Keane header.The goal, on 25 minutes, came against the run of play after the Bees had looked the better side in the opening stages.Burnley keeper Tom Heaton turned away an Alan Judge free-kick and was then equal to a shot from Lasse Vibe, who looked the brightest of the Brentford players.Vibe also latched on to a Konstantin Kerschbaumer through ball but delayed his shot and allowed Heaton to block with his legs.Burnley then scored with their second serious attempt on goal, a corner nodded in by Keane at the far post.That settled the home side down a little and quelled Brentford’s bright start, with Scott Arfield blazing a good opportunity over the bar.Alan McCormack forced Heaton into a save at his near post before being booked for a strong challenge on Burnley left-back Ben Mee.Burnley: Heaton; Darikwa, Duff, Keane, Mee; Boyd, Jones, Arfield, Kightly; Hennings, Jutkiewicz.Subs: Gilks, Ward, Anderson, Taylor, Vokes, Vossen, Sordell.Brentford: Button; McCormack, Dean, Tarkowski, Bidwell; Judge, Diagouraga, Kerschbaumer, Gogia; Hofmann, Vibe.Subs: Bonham, Barbet, Colin, O’Connell, Udumaga, Clarke, Senior.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Workers key to SA democracy: Zuma

first_img2 May 2013South Africa’s democracy would not be sustainable or successful if the plight of the working class, employed and unemployed, was not sufficiently attended to, President Jacob Zuma said on Wednesday.Speaking at the main Congress of SA Trade Unions (Cosatu) Workers’ Day rally in Kimberly, Northern Cape, Zuma said that the African National Congress (ANC) had a strong bias towards the working class and poor.“The ANC bias towards the working class does not mean we have abdicated our responsibility as a liberation movement to mobilize the broadest strata of society for fundamental transformation.“It simply means we have correctly understood that our democracy will not be stable, sustainable and successful if the plight of the working class, employed or unemployed, is not sufficiently attended to,” Zuma said.Workers’ rights such as the right to fair labour practices and the right to form and join trade unions were enshrined in the Constitution. “These are very important rights which must not be taken for granted.”Zuma said a tendency to divide workers or undermine collective bargaining among others should be guarded against.“Unity within Cosatu is paramount. We need a united Cosatu that is able to devote its attention to promoting the rights of workers. Thus we urge the labour movement to work seriously at uniting the federation and to resolve whatever differences there may exist.”Workers were the creators of the country’s wealth and they had to get an equitable share in the wealth, Zuma said, adding that attention needed to be paid to the plight of mineworkers and farm workers.“As we focus on miners and farm workers, we also remember those workers who tragically lost their lives in Marikana in the North West and related violent incidents. We have to draw lessons from Marikana.”The National Development Plan (NDP) was the country’s socio-development blueprint for the next 20 years, Zuma said.“We reiterate that those who have views about the NDP should feel free to raise them in the spirit of the democratic culture within the movement … Views cannot be suppressed. However, work is continuing to implement the NDP.”At government level, the Department of Performance Monitoring and Evaluation has already begun developing a draft medium-term strategic framework for 2014-2019, as the first five-year building block of the NDP.The intention is to submit the first draft of the 2014-2019 NDP-aligned framework to the 2013 July Cabinet lekgotla. This can then be refined so that it can be submitted to the new Cabinet for approval as soon as possible after the 2014 elections.This will enable departments to include the new targets in their individual five-year strategic plans, which they will be starting to work on later this year and in early 2014.Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

One Young World celebrates Mandela

first_imgKofi Annan, former UN secretary general will be a speaker at the Summit. (Images: One Young World Summit) 1 300 delegates from 190 countries at the One Young World Summit in Johannesburg.MEDIA CONTACTS • Amanda Mahlobi  Communications Officer  Waggener Edstrom  +27 11 550 5400 RELATED ARTICLES • One Young World Summit hits Joburg • SA is getting plenty right • Unpacking the National Development Plan • SA to host One Young World 2013 • Young people: own your destiny!Romaana NaidooSouth African struggle stalwart Ahmed Kathrada reminisced about his first encounter with former President and international icon Nelson Mandela, affectionately called Tata or Madiba, among 1 300 delegates from 190 countries at the One Young World Summit in Johannesburg.Paying homage to the former statesman during a special session on Knowing Nelson Mandela, Kathrada said, “When I met this man, when I was at school, he asked me questions about myself and what I was going to do with my life. . . He made me feel so comfortable and equal to him that I felt proud I could go back to my school friends and boast that I knew a university student.”Speaking about the trial that led to their conviction, Kathrada revealed how Madiba insisted on using the opportunity to make a political statement: “What he said, what we all followed when we gave evidence, is to go into the box, repeat your political views and do not apologise. Even if it’s a death sentence, we don’t appeal.”A visibly emotional Kathrada spoke of the racial segregation experienced at the hands of their prison guards: “Of the seven of us I was the only Indian. The first thing we had to do was change into prison clothes. I was given long trousers, while Madiba and all my colleagues were given short trousers. The rationale was that all blacks, regardless of their age, were children and children wore short trousers.”Kathrada was joined on stage by a teary-eyed Francois Pienaar and delegate Nobulalu Lali Dangazele to share intimate insights into their relationships with Madiba.Pienaar, who captained the South African rugby team, the Springboks, to victory in the 1995 Rugby World Cup, revealed the moment he first encountered Mandela saying: “I get a telephone call from Mary, Mr Mandela’s assistant, who says: ‘He would like to have tea with you’ – incredible.“My first thoughts were: ‘Why? What does he want to talk to me about?’ Then I became a chick and started worrying about what clothes I would wear.”He revealed: “I remember his booming voice and the size of the man. He took me into his office, poured me tea and for about an hour we sat and talked about life, politics and sport.”Mandela surprised the rugby team when South Africa reached the final of the world cup, Pienaar said. “We were getting ready for the game and there was a knock at the door… it was Mandela. What was he wearing? A Springboks jersey.“Often you hear great speeches from leaders, but do they follow through? Mandela is someone who did.”Pienaar quoted the former statesman, saying that sports can awaken hope where there was previously despair and has the potential to drive awareness of wider societal issues.Mandela Rhodes scholar, Lali Dangazele, spoke of how, after her first meeting with Madiba, he transformed into a father-like figure. She added that Madiba’s firm belief in the power of education left a significant impact on her: “He firmly believed that education is the silver bullet – the key that unlocks liberation.”Kofi Annan speaks “global issues”Following suit another special session ensued with the Kofi Annan Dialogues: Live. During this session delegates from South Africa, El Salvador, Libya and Nigeria spoke to the Nobel Peace Prize laureate via live-stream on a Google Hangout.Issue tabled ranged from the security in Nigeria and El Salvador to the on-going Syrian crisis.Annan said we are now living in a time of unprecedented change, and that as growth develops, new challenges arise at national, regional and global levels. He spoke about international issues such as youth unemployment, climate change, food and nutrition security, international security, transnational crime, sustainable development, terrorism and religious extremism.He added that people have the power to make a change if they organise and use the strength of a collective voice, and that problems are without visas and passports.He continued, saying that in order to address these problems, it is important to begin with cohesive societies. The three core pillars of a cohesive society, according to Annan, are peace and stability, development, rule of law and respect for human rights.“Change takes time. It is not an event, it is a process,” he said.Gender equalityDuring an on-the-spot survey at the summit, 48% of attendees believed that gender equality is the number one global human rights issue.According to a statement from One Young World, “From career-based discrimination to crushing poverty and violence, women’s rights are routinely violated on a daily basis. Violence causes more death and disability worldwide amongst women aged 15 – 44 than war, cancer, malaria and traffic accidents combined. Of all the illiterate adults in the world, two-thirds are women. Globally, women make up just 17% of parliamentarians, and of the FTSE 100 companies, only three have women CEOs.”Delegate speakers for this session included Mohammad Almunaikh (Kuwait), Amanda Dufresne (United States of America(US)), Ilwad Elman (Somalia), Sally Hasler (Hong Kong), Kaierouann Imarah Radix (Guyana), and Emily Revess (United Kingdom(UK)).Dufresne, a rape survivor, spoke out about sexual violence being a silent epidemic. Holding back her tears, she shared her personal story, saying, “In the US recently, statistics show up to one in five women will be raped in their lifetime.“We need to talk to young boys about respecting girls’ minds, bodies, and souls; to treat them as equals,” she said.According to Elman, one in three women will be beaten and raped in their lifetime. She runs the Elman Peace and Human Rights Centre in Mogadishu with her mother, Fartun Adan. Most recently, Elman’s organisation established Sister Somalia, the only safe-house in Somalia. It is dedicated to providing support to survivors of sexual violence.Youth unemploymentAn insightful session on Youth Unemployment, on day three of the summit on 4 October, highlighted that despite the vast majority (80% of attendees) believing the number of unemployed young people in their country will not fall in the next 12 months, even more (91%) believe it is possible to solve the problem.Almost a quarter of the planet’s youth are neither working nor studying.Youth unemployment is a high priority for the One Young World community, which overwhelmingly elected to have the topic on the summit agenda for the first time.The delegation, James Eder (UK), Adelard Kakunze (Burundi), Jeremy Lamri (France), Rukayat Olamide (Nigeria), Efehan Danisman (Turkey) and Yiwen Wu (China), looked at youth creating their own employment opportunities.Danisman said, “73 million young people will be unemployed this year,” while Kakunze added that “Burundi is among 15 countries with the highest unemployment rate in the world.“It is about being proactive and about taking responsibility for your contribution in the world,” said Eder.According to Johannesburg executive mayor, Mpho Parks Tau, “It is important that the youth work together with their leaders to find solutions to the challenges of youth unemployment, and the One Young World Summit 2013 presents an ideal platform for this exchange of ideas to happen.”One Young World was founded in 2009 by David Jones and Kate Robertson. This London-based charity gathers together youth from across the globe in an attempt to establish lasting relationships to drive positive change.The charity stages annual summits where young delegates, backed by One Young World counsellors, debate and formulate solutions for international issues. After the summit, the One Young World ambassadors work on their own initiatives, or lend the power of the summit’s network to those already in place.last_img read more

USDA allows producers to opt out of MPP

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) announced that starting Sept. 1, 2017, dairy producers can enroll for 2018 coverage in the Margin Protection Program (MPP-Dairy).  Secretary Sonny Perdue has utilized additional flexibility this year by providing dairy producers the option of opting out of the program for 2018.“Secretary Perdue is using his authority to allow producers to withdraw from the MPP Dairy Program and not pay the annual administrative fee for 2018,” said Rob Johansson, Acting Deputy Under Secretary for Farm Production and Conservation. “The decision is in response to requests by the dairy industry and a number of MPP-Dairy program participants.”To opt out, a producer should not sign up during the annual registration period. By opting out, a producer would not receive any MPP-Dairy benefits if payments are triggered for 2018. Full details will be included in a subsequent Federal Register Notice. The decision would be for 2018 only and is not retroactive.The voluntary program, established by the 2014 Farm Bill, provides financial assistance to participating dairy producers when the margin — the difference between the price of milk and feed costs — falls below the coverage level selected by the producer.MPP-Dairy gives participating dairy producers the flexibility to select coverage levels best suited for their operation. Enrollment ends on Dec. 15, 2017, for coverage in calendar year 2018. Participating farmers will remain in the program through Dec. 31, 2018, and pay a minimum $100 administrative fee for 2018 coverage. Producers have the option of selecting a different coverage level from the previous coverage year during open enrollment.Dairy operations enrolling in the program must meet conservation compliance provisions and cannot participate in the Livestock Gross Margin Dairy Insurance Program. Producers can mail the appropriate form to the producer’s administrative county FSA office, along with applicable fees, without necessitating a trip to the local FSA office. If electing higher coverage for 2018, dairy producers can either pay the premium in full at the time of enrollment or pay 100 percent of the premium by Sept. 1, 2018. Premium fees may be paid directly to FSA or producers can work with their milk handlers to remit premiums on their behalf.USDA has a web tool to help producers determine the level of coverage under the MPP-Dairy that will provide them with the strongest safety net under a variety of conditions. The online resource, available at www.fsa.usda.gov/mpptool, allows dairy farmers to quickly and easily combine unique operation data and other key variables to calculate their coverage needs based on price projections. Producers can also review historical data or estimate future coverage based on data projections. The secure site can be accessed via computer, Smartphone, tablet or any other platform, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.For more information, visit FSA online at www.fsa.usda.gov/dairy or stop by a local FSA office to learn more about the MPP-Dairy.last_img read more

Six Regrets

first_imgWasting your talents. You were born with some talent. You may not recognize your gift. Or you may have recognized your gift and set it aside because you didn’t believe your talent was enough. Your talent is a gift for you to use. If you believe it is a gift, then not using it would be to be ungrateful for what you have been given. It would also deprive the world of your talent and deprive it of a gift that only you can give. You don’t want to regret wasting your talents.Not making a contribution. You are here for a reason. You are here to make a difference, to make a contribution. You may not know what your purpose is right now. That just means your job is to figure that out. If you do know what your purpose is and what your contribution is supposed to be, that’s what you should be doing. Even if it’s not how you make a living. Don’t regret not doing what you were here to do.Not spending time with the people you love. Our work keeps us away from home and away from the ones we love. It’s tough to find the time to spend with the most important people in your hectic life. But ultimately, a lack of investment of time and emotional energy here is what you are likely to regret most of all. You can’t put a hold on time with the people whom you care about most. Your time is short, and no matter how much time you spend here, you will later wish it had been more. Double down and don’t regret not spending time with your people.Not forgiving or accepting forgiveness. Forgiveness is a gift you give yourself. At some point, you will understand that most of the times you believed that someone had wronged you, the other person was suffering far more than you suffered. They were also suffering a much deeper pain. Most of all, you will realize that you need forgiveness as much as anyone else, and you’ll hope that no one deprives you of that forgiveness. When they offer forgiveness, accept it.Living someone else’s life. There are plenty of people who are willing to tell you what your life should be based on what they believe their perfect life should be like. But their life belongs to them, and your life belongs to you alone. You will never be truly happy allowing someone else’s ideas, opinions, or expectations determine for you what your life should be. You will never regret living your own life, and making it 100% your own adventure.Not living fully. Life is made up of experiences. You get to decide what those experiences are. Living fully means using your talents and gifts, making your contribution, spending time with the people you love, forgiving and accepting forgiveness, and blazing your trail. Your life is yours to live fully. Do everything you want to do, and don’t regret a minute of it.last_img read more