Former Attorney General dies

first_imgFormer Attorney General of Guyana, Justice Mohamed Shahahbuddeen, died early Saturday morning in Toronto, Canada, after a brief period of illness, leaving behind an illustrious career.The late Justice Mohamed ShahabuddeenJustice Shahabuddeen, 81, will be remembered for his distinguished service as an eminent Judge of the International Court of Justice, a lawyer, public servant, politician and diplomat.In 1953, he graduated for the University of London with a Bachelor of Law. In 1958 he earned his Master of Law, in 1970 he earned his Doctor of Philosophy and in 1986 the title of Doctor of Law.Justice Mohamed Shahabuddeen began his public service as a Magistrate before joining the Chamber of the Attorney General in 1959. In 1962 he was appointed Solicitor General, a post he held until 1973 when he was elevated to the position of Attorney General, serving in that capacity from 1978 to 1987. In 1983 he was appointed Deputy Prime Minister and Vice President of Guyana.From 1988 to 1997 he served as a Judge of the International Court of Justice in The Hague, the first from the Commonwealth Caribbean to be accorded this signal honour. Subsequently, he was Judge and twice Vice President of the Yugoslavia Tribunal until 2009. In addition, he has been an Arbiter in the International Criminal Court, also in The Hague since 1997, and the Centre for International Arbitration in Cairo. In January 2009, he was chosen as a Judge of the International Criminal Court.Justice Mohamed Shahabuddeen authored several books, including The Legal System of Guyana (Georgetown, 1973); Constitutional Development in Guyana, 1621-1978 (Georgetown, 1978); Nationalisation of Guyana Bauxite (1981) and From Plantocracy to Nationalisation (1983).In recognition of the distinction and eminence achieved by him, he was awarded by the Government of Guyana the Order of Excellence in 1988, the Order of Roraima in 1980 and the Cacique’s Crown of Honour in 1970.According to his biography on The Integrationist Caribbean, “To perceive Justice Shahabuddeen as a mere legal luminary is an injustice to one who has made a major impact on his discipline, on the public life of the region and on the regional and international stages.”Meanwhile, President David Granger in a statement later on Saturday extended heartfelt sympathy to the family and loved ones of the late Justice Mohamed Shahahbuddeen, especially his children Faud, Sieyf and Shalisa.last_img read more