Saving the world’s kids from fire

first_imgZimbabwean toddler Tapera Jani at the start of his treatment for both burns and kwashiorkor at the Children of Fire shelter in Johannesburg. (Image: Irin Photo)A few months ago Tapera Jani, a three-year-old boy from a farm outside Bulawayo in southern Zimbabwe, walked into a fire. The toddler was left with life-threatening burns to his legs and, in a country with a collapsed health system, no-one to help him.Luckily the owner of the farm on which Tapera lived with his parents had heard of Children of Fire, a South African organisation which  rescues and rehabilitates children across the world who fall victim to fire.In all developing countries, fire is the essential source of energy for poorer households. And whether it is in paraffin lamps, charcoal braziers or flaming piles of wood, fire will often cause accidents injuring, disfiguring and often killing those households’ children.Children of Fire was founded in South Africa by journalist Bronwen Jones after, in 1994, she met Dorah Mokoena, a toddler who almost died in a shack fire in a squatter camp. The fire burnt off Dorah’s face, eyesight and hands – leaving her blind, her features melted into scar tissue, and with stumps at the end of her arms.Jones and her son Tristan took Dorah into their home, where the girl, now a teenager, is a permanent member of the family. Unlike many, she has had the benefit of reconstructive surgery, with her nose and lips rebuilt, and some ability to communicate restored.Dorah’s disfigurement made her the poster child for Children of Fire. She has helped attract the more privileged world’s attention to the horrific physical dangers millions of children face being born into families surviving on nothing.With three-year-old Tapera, Jones and her team were ready to deal with his burns. But the toddler was also a victim of Zimbabwe’s collapse – its meltdown economy and nonexistent healthcare.A citizen of a country that recently was the breadbasket of Southern Africa, the boy was suffering from kwashiorkor, a life-threatening form of malnutrition caused by a lack of protein – and a disease unknown in Zimbabwe 10 years ago.“If Tapera had not died of his burns, he would have died of starvation in [Zimbabwean president Robert] Mugabe’s country,” said Jones, kissing the now-healthy and smiling child.“He weighed 8.5kg when he arrived. We expected him to weigh double that for his biological age.”Children of Fire, established in South Africa over a decade ago, is now registered as a charity in the UK. It has helped 70 children with severe burns and 200 from across Africa who required less complicated surgery.“We continue to help the 70 children who need complicated surgery,” Jones said.The organisation has come to expect complications in each case it takes up.“There is poverty and HIV/Aids in the region – as we help to heal the children, we have to deal with all their problems,” said Jones.Reconstructive surgery is expensive, particularly reconstructing faces and limbs ravaged by fire.“It can cost anywhere between R40 000 (US$4 123) to R1-million ($103 095) per child,” she said. The charity, therefore, takes on few surgical cases.“The ones we do, we know no-one else would help; for example, if the child is also HIV-positive.”The organisation’s focus is therefore not on expensive surgery. Its more important work is helping children damaged by fire come to terms with their disability, cope with the social stigma of their disfigurement, and develop the courage to reintegrate with family, friends and society.“I often end up being rude to people who stare at my children, despite my telling them not to do so, as it upsets them,” Jones said.“Acceptance and getting people to see the child inside is perhaps the most difficult thing.”Children of Fire works with a network of doctors, surgeons and healthcare specialists, most volunteers. The charity has never received government aid, and operates entirely on public donations, using volunteers from across the world.“My son Tristan calls us a boot-camp for spoilt European students,” said Jones. Children come and go out of the house which serves as a home and office for the charity in Melville, a suburb of Johannesburg in Gauteng province. A school near the main building, with a staff of three teachers, helps educate the children while they are in the organisation’s care.More than 90% of burn injuries across the world occur in developing countries, with 70% of these burn victims children, according to statistics from the Welsh Centre for Burns and Plastic Surgery in the UK and the Dow University Medical College Burns Centre in Pakistan.According to Children of Fire estimates, at least 15 000 South African children are burned every year. The incidence of burning is higher in winter, when the need for warmth means more fires, and more chance for tragic accidents.In South Africa’s five biggest cities an average of 200 people die in shack fires every year, according to Abahlali baseMjondolo, a South African shack dwellers’ movement.Besides helping children with burn injuries, Children of Fire also tries to educate people shacklands and other poor and unserviced residential areas on preventing fires.“These are simple measures such as not cooking on the ground [where children may easily walk into fires] and not allowing children to sleep alone with an open fire,” said Jones.The organisation also provides construction materials and other household essentials to communities that have been victims of fire.Jones has also been trying to get the authorities to implement a ban on the use of a particular brand of unsafe cooking stove that leaks paraffin oil.“These stoves cost only about R40 (about $4), while the safer ones cost about R200 (about $20), which few residents in squatter camps can afford.“I wish someone could help with cheaper, safer versions.”MediaClubSouthAfrica.com reporter and Irin News Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Mary Alexander at marya@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.Related articlesChampioning the children of fire Useful linksChildren of Fire Irin Newslast_img read more

Health care in South Africa

first_imgSouth Africa’s public health system is a countrywide network of care facilities ranging from mobile and rural clinics to huge academic hospitals in the urban centres.A new mother takes her baby for a checkup and vaccinations at a local clinic. (Image: Department of Health)In this article:IntroductionExpenditure on healthNational, provincial and localNational Health InsuranceFacilitiesDoctor shortagesStatutory bodiesLegislationHealth profile: HIV, TB, maternal and child health, malariaTraditional medicineIntroductionHealth care in South Africa varies from the most basic primary health care, offered free by the state, to highly specialised, hi-tech health services available in the both the public and private sector.However, the public sector is stretched and under-resourced in places. While the state contributes about 40% of all expenditure on health, the public health sector is under pressure to deliver services to about 80% of the population.The private sector, on the other hand, is run largely on commercial lines and caters to middle- and high-income earners who tend to be members of medical schemes. It also attracts most of the country’s health professionals.This two-tiered system is not only inequitable and inaccessible to a large portion of South Africans, but institutions in the public sector have suffered poor management, underfunding and deteriorating infrastructure. While access has improved, the quality of health care has fallen.The situation is compounded by public health challenges, including the burden of diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis (TB), and a shortage of key medical personnel.However, the South African government is responding with a far-reaching reform plan to revitalise and restructure the South African health care system, including:Fast-tracking the implementation of a National Health Insurance scheme, which will eventually cover all South Africans.Strengthening the fight against HIV and TB, non-communicable diseases, as well as injury and violence.Improving human-resource management at state hospitals and strengthening co- ordination between the public and private health sector.Deploying “health teams” to communities and schools.Regulating costs to make health care affordable to all.Increasing life expectancy from 56.5 years in 2009 to 58.5 years in 2014.ExpenditureThe bulk of health-sector funding comes from the South Africa’s National Treasury. The health budget for 2012/13 was R121-billion, which was aimed at improving hospitals and strengthening public health ahead of the National Health Insurance scheme.In 2011, total spend on health was R248.6-billion – or around 8.3% of GDP, way above the 5% recommended by the World Health Organisation (WHO). Despite this high expenditure, health outcomes remain poor when compared to similar middle-income countries. This can largely be attributed to the inequities between the public and private sector.According to the National Treasury’s Fiscal Review for 2011, the GDP spend on health was split as follows:R120.8-billion (48.5%) in the private sector, which covers 16.2% of the population or 8.2-million people, many of whom have medical cover.R122.4-billion (49.2%) in the public sector, which is made up of 84% of the population, or 42-million people, who generally rely on the public health care sector.The remaining R5.3-billion (2.3%) is donor and NGO spend.See South Africa gears up for National HealthThe latest budget on the National Treasury’s websiteNational, provincial and localBefore South Africa’s first democratic elections, hospitals were assigned to particular racial groups and most were concentrated in white areas. With 14 different health departments, the system was characterised by fragmentation and duplication. But in 1994 the dismantling began, and transformation is now under fully under way.However, high levels of poverty and unemployment mean health care remains largely the burden of the state. The Department of Health holds overall responsibility for health care, with a specific responsibility for the public sector.Visit the Department of HealthProvincial health departments provide and manage comprehensive health services, via a district-based, public health-care model. Local hospital management has delegated authority over operational issues, such as the budget and human resources, to facilitate quicker responses to local needs.Public health consumes around 11% of the government’s total budget, which is allocated and mostly spent by the nine provinces. How these resources are allocated, and the standard of health care delivered, varies from province to province.A Health Charter has been devised with the aim of creating a platform for engagement between sectors to address issues of access, equity and quality of health services as well as issues of broad-based black economic empowerment and employment equity.Download a copy of the Revised Draft Health Charter [PDF]South Africa has more than 110 registered medical schemes, with around 3,4-million principal members (and 7,8-million beneficiaries).See the Council for Medical Schemes, an autonomous statutory body created by parliament.Hundreds of NGOs make an essential contribution to HIV, Aids and TB, mental health, cancer, disability and the development of public health systems. The part played by NGOs – from a national level, through provincial and local, to their role in individual communities – is vitally important to the functioning of the overall system.National Health InsuranceThe Department of Health is focused on implementing an improved health system, which involves an emphasis focus on public health, as well as improving the functionality and management of the system through stringent budget and expenditure monitoring.Known as the “10-point plan”, the strategic programme is improving hospital infrastructure and human resources management, as well as procurement of the necessary equipment and skills.Under this plan, health facilities – such as nursing colleges and tertiary hospitals – are being upgraded and rebuilt to lay the way for the implementation of the National Health Insurance (NHI) scheme.The NHI is intended to bring about reform that will improve service provision and health care delivery. It will promote equity and efficiency to ensure that all South Africans have access to affordable, quality health care services regardless of their employment status and ability to make a direct monetary contribution to the NHI Fund.The NHI will be phased in over 14 years, beginning in 2012. In 2012/13, the government earmarked R1-billion to its pilot projects.Apart from infrastructure and management overhauls, another factor for ensuring the success of the NHI will be the strict regulation of the sector to make it more affordable to all South Africans.See the Department of Health’s FAQs on the NHIFacilitiesThere are 4 200 public health facilities in South Africa. People per clinic is 13  718, exceeding WHO guidelines of 10 000 per clinic. However, figures from March 2009 show that people averaged 2.5 visits a year to public health facilities and the usable bed occupancy rates were between 65% and 77% at hospitals.Since 1994, more than 1 600 clinics have been built or upgraded. Free health care for children under six and for pregnant or breastfeeding mothers was introduced in the mid-1990s.The National Health Laboratory Service is the largest pathology service in South Africa. It has 265 laboratories, serving 80% of South Africans. The labs provide diagnostic services as well as health-related research.See the National Health Laboratory ServiceDoctor shortagesIn March 2012, 165 371 qualified health practitioners in both public and private sectors were registered with the Health Professions Council of South Africa, the health practitioner watchdog body. This includes 38 236 doctors and 5 560 dentists.The doctor-to-population ratio is estimated to be 0.77 per 1 000. But because the vast majority of GPs – 73% – work in the private sector, there is just one practising doctor for every 4 219 people.In response, the Department of Health has introduced clinical health associates, midlevel health-care providers, to work in underserved rural areas.About 1 200 medical students graduate annually. In some communities, medical students provide health services at clinics under supervision. Newly graduating doctors and pharmacists complete a year of compulsory community service in understaffed hospitals and clinics.In an attempt to boost the number of doctors in the country, South Africa signed a co- operation agreement with Cuba in 1995. South Africa has since recruited hundreds of Cuban doctors to practice here, while South Africa is able to send medical students to Cuba to study.South Africa believes the Cuban opportunity will help train the doctors it so desperately needs for the implementation of the National Health Insurance Scheme.Other agreements exist with Tunisia and Iran, as well as between Johannesburg Hospital and Maputo Central Hospital.The government has also made it easier for other foreign doctors to register here.The Allied Health Professions Council of South Africa had 3 773 registered “complementary health” practitioners in 2012.See the Allied Health Professions Council of South AfricaStatutory bodiesStatutory bodies for the health-service professions include:Allied Health Professions Council of South AfricaCouncil for Medical SchemesHealth Professions Council of South AfricaMedicines Control CouncilThe National Health Laboratory ServiceSouth African Dental Technicians CouncilSouth African Medical Research CouncilSouth African Nursing CouncilSouth African Pharmacy CouncilLegislationThe National Health Act, 61 of 2003, provides a framework for a single health system for South Africa. The Act provides for a number of basic health care rights, including the right to emergency treatment and the right to participate in decisions regarding one’s health.The implementation of the Act was initiated in 2006, and some provinces are engaged in aligning their provincial legislation with the national Act.Other legislation relating to health care, some recently passed, include laws which aim to:Ensure all health establishments comply with minimum standards through an independent entity (National Health Amendment Bill, 2010)Make drugs more affordable and provide for transparency in the pricing of medicines (Medicines and Related Substances Amendment Act, 59 of 2002)Regulate the medical schemes industry to prevent it from discriminating against “high risk” individuals like the aged and sick (Medical Schemes Act, 1998)Legalise abortion and allow for safe access to it in both public and private health facilities (Choice on Termination of Pregnancy Act, 92 of 1996)Limit smoking in public places, create public awareness of the health risks of tobacco by requiring certain information on packaging, and prohibt the sale of tobacco produces to anyone younger than 18 (Tobacco Products Control Amendment Act, 23 of 2007)Provide for the introduction of mandatory community service for nurses (Nursing Act, 2005)Introduce a process to develop and redesign mental health services so as to grant basic rights to people with mental illnesses (Mental Health Care Act, 2002)Allow non-pharmacists to own pharmacies, with the aim of improving access to medicines (Pharmacy Amendment Act, 2000). This came into effect during May 2003.Other important developments in health care policy and legislation include:The Health Professions Amendment Bill of 2006The Traditional Health Practitioners Act, 35 of 2004Regulations relating to the Labelling and Advertising of Foodstuffs came into effect in May 2012, and aim to empower citizens to make healthy food choices.Find full copies of health-related Acts, Bills, and other legal documents on the Department of Health’s websiteHealth profileHIV and tuberculosisAids and other poverty-related diseases such as tuberculosis and cholera place a tremendous strain on South Africa’s health care system. According to Statistics South Africa, in 2011:The overall HIV prevalence rate was 10,6%. About one-fifth of South African women in their reproductive ages were HIV positive.There were 5,38-million people living with HIV. This was up from 4,21-million in 2001.16,6% of the adult population (aged 15-49) years was HIV positive.There were about 2,01-million orphans due to HIV.New HIV infections for 2011 among adults was estimated at 316 900.An estimated 1,06-million adults and 105 123 children were receiving antiretroviral treatment in 2010. This was up from 101 416 and close to 12 000 children in 2005.In May 2012, the government said it had cut the mother-to-child transmission rate from 3.5% in 2010 to less than 2%. It also said the rate of new infections had dropped from 1.4% to 0.8% in the 18 to 24 age groups.South Africa’s HIV/Aids battle planHealth sector overhaul on track: reportHIV and TB are dangerous bed fellows: the co-infection rates exceed 70%, with TB being the most common opportunistic infection in HIV-positive patients.Because of late detection, poor treatment management, drug-resistant forms of TB (known as DR-TB or multidrug-resistant TB; and XDR TB or extensively drug-resistant TB) have increased significantly, with about 5 500 cases diagnosed during 2009.See the WHO’s factsheet on tuberculosisIntegrating the double scourge of HIV/Aids and TB for the first time, the government has launched the National Strategic Plan for HIV/AIDS and TB for 2012 – 2016. It is shored up by a provincial implementation programme.The plan seeks to address the social structural drivers of HIV/Aids, STD and TB care, prevention and support; to prevent new infections; to sustain health and wellness; and to protect human rights and access to justice of sufferers.The HIV Counselling and Testing (HCT) campaign was launched in April 2010 – by mid- 2012, almost 20-million people had been tested and knew their status. Millions were also screened for TB.Increasing the number of anti-retroviral sites as well as nurses certified to initiate ARV treatment has seen 1.7-million people placed on ARV treatment, from 1.1-million in 2009. South Africa has the largest ARV therapy programme in the world, and an improved procurement process has seen a 50% decrease in the prices of ARV drugs.Download the National Strategic Plan for HIV/AIDS and TB for 2012 [PDF]Download the Global Aid Response Progress Report 2012 [PDF]Visit UNAids profile of South Africa, which includes statistics and progress reportsMaternal healthSouth Africa is a signatory to several international commitments such as the UN’s Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which seeks to address the health needs of women and children. However, in South Africa the health of mothers and children remains poor.According to statistics from WHO, South Africa has a maternal mortality ratio of 310 deaths per 100 000 lives births. The infant (under-1) mortality rate in 2010 was 41 deaths per 1 000 live births, while the under-5 mortality rate was 57 per 1 000 live births.Under the national prevention of mother-to-child (PMTCT) programme, every pregnant woman is offered HIV testing and counselling. If a woman tests positive for HIV, she is put on to a regime of anti-retroviral therapy to avoid transmitting the virus to her baby, and is offered a continuum of treatment, care and support for herself and her infant.But it is really access and utilisation of antenatal care services that most influence pregnancy outcome, child survival and maternal health. The renewed focus on primary health and the improving and expanding the health system infrastructure should go some way to addressing the high mortality rates – and get South Africa closer to the MDG target of reducing infant mortality to 20 by 2015.The Department of Health has a strategic plan in place which identifies “priority interventions” that will have the greatest influence on reducing mortality rates, as well as enhancing gender equity and reproductive health.The campaign on Accelerated Reduction of Maternal Mortality in Africa (CARMMA), an African Union initiative, was launched in May 2012 and aims to reduce maternal and infant mortality rates.Download the Strategic Plan for Maternal, Newborn, Child and Women’s Health and Nutrition in South Africa 2012 – 2016 [PDF]See the UN website on its Millennium Development GoalsRead more about the African Union’s CARMMA campaignChild healthImmunisation is a significant barrier against disease and death, and the rates of children receiving their primary vaccines have steadily been increasing under immunisation programmes. These aim to protect children against vaccine-preventable diseases, such as measles, TB, cholera and pertussis.Measures to improve child health also include the expansion and strengthening of school health services and the establishment of district clinical specialist teams.Other prevention services, such as regular deworming and growth monitoring, help protect children’s health.The Health of our Children report in 2010, which surveyed 8 966 children, found that HIV prevalence among infants (age 0 to 2 years) was 2.1%, lower than the 3.3% average in the age 0 to 4 years, suggesting a positive impact of the national Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission programme, begun in 2006.Download a copy of the Health of our Children reportMalariaMalaria is not endemic in South Africa, and does not pose a major health risk. According to the WHO’s World Malaria Report 2010, only 4% of the population is at high risk of malaria and 6% at low risk, while 90% live in malaria-free areas. Almost all cases are caused by Plasmodium falciparum. Transmission occurs seasonally, with peak rates of infection occurring in April and declining by June.See the WHO’s Malaria Country Profile, 2010 for South Africa [PDF]Traditional medicineAn estimated 80% of South Africans consult with traditional healers alongside general medical practitioners.The Medical Research Council (MRC) founded a traditional medicines research unit in 1997 to introduce modern research methodologies around the use of traditional medicines. It also aims to develop a series of patents for promising new entities derived from medicinal plants.See the MRC’s Traditional Medicines Research UnitBrand South Africa reporterLast reviewed: 2 July 2012Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Mark Barroca wins PBA Governors’ Cup Finals MVP

first_imgIs Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? Terrence Romeo tells Leo Austria: ‘I don’t care if I’m starting or not, I just want to win’ Barroca, who is now a six-time PBA champion, averaged 11 points, 3.2 rebounds and 3.2 assists and 1.8 steals per game in the championship round.“This championship is special because it’s been a long time since we won the championship,” Barroca said in a TV interview shortly after the final buzzer of Game 6.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chief Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion LATEST STORIES Magnolia guard Mark Barroca more than made up for his rough play in Game 4 that nearly cost him a suspension with a Finals MVP performance in the 2018 PBA Governors’ Cup title series against Alaska.ADVERTISEMENT PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño Mark Barroca upon receiving his Finals MVP trophy. #PBA2018 pic.twitter.com/oAbi3YobeJ— Bong Lozada (@BLozadaINQ) December 19, 2018 TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Hotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issue Lacson: 2019 budget delay due to P75-B House ‘insertion’ The 32-year-old Barroca helped the Hotshots close out the Aces in six games with 13 points, five rebounds, four assists and one steal in a masterful 102-86 victory Wednesday night.Barroca bagged his second Finals MVP plum after also earning the recognition back in the 2014 Philippine Cup.Magnolia gave the Purefoods franchise its 14 crown overall and ended a four-year title drought.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ View commentslast_img read more

Primary-School Students Present Gifts to Centenarian

first_img Meanwhile, Mrs. Miller Wisdom told JIS News that the outreach programme, which has been a feature of the school for many years, falls within its strategic plans. Story Highlights Students and teachers of the Rose Hall-based John Rollins Success Primary School, accompanied by their principal, Yvonne Miller Wisdom, wrapped up their 2017 Christmas outreach programme on December 18.Their final stop took them to Barrett Town, to the home of 100-year-old Merinda Bryan, where they presented the centenarian, who is fondly called ‘Miss Mim’, with several gifts, including a new remote-controlled electric fan.Only several days before, they had visited basic and infant schools and homes of the sick and the elderly in other neighbouring communities of Zion, Spot Valley, Cornwall, Palmyra, Lilliput and Barrett Town to spread the Christmas cheer.Miss Mim, who was born on December 6, 1917, is the mother of six children, 16 grandchildren, 26 great-grandchildren and 10 great-great-grandchildren.She said she was happy to receive the gifts, which came less than two weeks following her birthday celebrations.A member of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, Miss Mim said in her youthful days she worked at the Tryall Estate in Hanover as a farmhand, and later became a shopkeeper.Meanwhile, Mrs. Miller Wisdom told JIS News that the outreach programme, which has been a feature of the school for many years, falls within its strategic plans.She said the Christmas outreach programme was among several other similar activities that the school undertakes each year, and which are driven by a community outreach coordinator and a committee.She noted that the 932 students at her institution are organised into clubs and societies, and each of the groupings is required to undertake fundraising activities, as well as source donations of food, toys and other items, which are taken to the school during its official barrel drive at Christmas to be sorted and packaged into individual presents.There are eight clubs and societies in operation at the John Rollins Success Primary School – the Red Cross, Brownies, K-Kids, Culture, Science Club, Cub Scout, Environmental Club and the Bible Club.“As part of our school-improvement plan, one of the objectives is to participate in community outreach. And so, we believe that the students are supposed to be exposed as much as is possible, not just to focus on the academics, because to get a job in the future, they need to be able to relate to others. Coming out into the community and reaching out to others, that is just one aspect… so at this stage, we have to train them,” Mrs. Miller Wisdom said.Eleven-year-old sixth-grader and President of the K-Kids Club, Elizabeth Minors, told JIS News that she was very pleased that her club, which is a junior arm of Kiwanis International, was able to contribute to the activities, especially the visit to Miss Mim.“It is a privilege to come and be able celebrate the hundredth birthday with a centenarian, and I hope that God blesses her and allows her to see many more days,” she said.Coordinator for the outreach programme at the school, Margaret Harwood Farquharson, said the students at the institution are always eager to participate in humanitarian activities, which became a major part of the institution as far back as 2006.“Our school was officially opened in 2004, and we saw the need to impact our community, so, as a result of that, we coordinated the activity and got the teachers involved,” she explained.“I think it is very important to get the students involved in outreach, because it gives them the opportunity to share with others. So, when they grow up, they will be able to socialise better, and when they see a need, they will be able to assist,” she added. Students and teachers of the Rose Hall-based John Rollins Success Primary School, accompanied by their principal, Yvonne Miller Wisdom, wrapped up their 2017 Christmas outreach programme on December 18. Their final stop took them to Barrett Town, to the home of 100-year-old Merinda Bryan, where they presented the centenarian, who is fondly called ‘Miss Mim’, with several gifts, including a new remote-controlled electric fan. last_img read more

Sir Patrick Stewart Attends Duchess Of Cornwalls Reception For Survivors Of Domestic

first_imgHer Royal Highness The Duchess of Cornwall hosted a reception last week for survivors of domestic abuse, those working in the field, and charities aiming to raise awareness of the issue at Clarence House.The Duchess meets Sir Patrick Stewart at a reception she hosted at Clarence House for domestic abuse survivors and campaignersCredit/Copyright: www.princeofwales.gov.uk/The Duchess decided to hold this reception after a hearing stories of domestic abuse survivors during a visit to the charity, SafeLives back in February of this year. The Duchess also held a similar reception for survivors of rape and sexual abuse and has heard from them how helpful it was to share their experiences with policy makers.The Duchess was joined by Sir Patrick Stewart, a long-time campaigner for women and children affected by domestic abuse and by Louiza Patikas, whose role as Helen from BBC’s ‘The Archers’ is shining a light on the issue of domestic abuse.Source:www.princeofwales.gov.uklast_img read more

Ottawa failing to respond in face of Attawapiskat crisis NDP MP

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe state of emergency in Attawapiska First Nation isn’t getting the response the community was hoping for.The chief of the community declared the state of emergency because people were living in tents and, with temperatures plunging, the situation there is getting desperate.APTN National News reporter Annette Francis has this story.last_img