MoBay City Run seeks more $$ for students

first_imgWESTERN BUREAU:Organisers are looking at participation in this year’s MoBay City Run/Walk races to top 4,000. The event last year drew almost 3,000 runners and raised approximately $3 million in the process.”We are doing our best to see how much we can, but we are realistically looking at about $5 million this year,” said chief organiser, Janet Silvera.The event is held to raise funds for assisting students in defraying costs at tertiary institutions.Four institutions will benefit directly from proceeds of the MoBay City Run – the University of the West Indies and University of Technology (western campuses), Sam Sharpe Teachers’ College, and Montego Bay Community College.The event, which consist of a 5K Run/Walk and a 10K Run, had its launch on Tuesday at the Holiday Inn Resort and indications are that this year’s renewal will be much bigger and better for the runners.RACE ROUTEThe race will get under way on Sunday, May 1 in the vicinity of the Old Hospital Park in Montego Bay and will take the runners and walkers through the city and back to the starting line, where the race will end.Two-time men’s winner, Ronique Williams, will be back defending his title, as will female champion Arieta Martin.Williams have made the MoBay City Run his own, winning the overall title in the event’s inaugural staging in 2014, and return with a bang last year to defend his title, when he completed the race in 36 minutes and 17 seconds. He is among the favourites again this year.Martin took the female first place medal and trophy in a time of 47 minutes and 10 seconds and could repeat as champion.However, with an expected increase in overseas participation, especially among the female runners, Martin will be hard pressed to hold on to her crown.In preparation for the event, organisers have maintained the fitness camp, which will run from March 12 at the Old Hospital Park, on Gloucester Avenue.The team section was one of the most exciting aspects of the City Run last year and will again be a spectacle of colours. Riu Hotel won the team trophy by sending a huge contingent of 521 members in 2015.Scotiabank, FLOW and the Royalton Hotel will feature again this year with big contingents also.last_img read more

Health Advice Keeps Changing

first_imgMany things the experts told us were good for us or bad for us have “evolved” – sometimes into opposite counsel.Health is of huge concern in science, because the only organisms doing science are human beings. We can watch what happens to us and others when we eat certain things. This should be one of the easiest, most repeatable subjects in science. Why can’t the experts get it right?Components of heart healthy diet may differ from what was previously thought (Medical Xpress). Dairy products and meat are back on the table. Much of the advice from a huge study of 218,000 people from 50 countries remains, like limiting carbohydrates, but meat and dairy is OK again. “Our results appeared to apply to people from different parts of the world and so the findings are globally applicable.”Vitamin D—a pseudo-vitamin for a pseudo-disease (Medical Xpress). It wasn’t long ago that the media strongly encouraged most of us to take vitamin D:We are still in love with vitamins a century after they were discovered, with half the US and UK population taking a supplement. Vitamin D – the sunshine vitamin – is the favourite and is believed to have the most proven benefits. Governments, including the UK government, have said that the evidence for vitamin D’s health benefits is so overwhelming that every adult should take it as a supplement for at least six months of the year.Now, that advice is being called into question by a study involving 500,000 participants. Vitamin D’s alleged benefits to strengthen bones seems spurious. Scientists don’t know how to characterize vitamin D deficiency. Some are not even sure it should be called a vitamin at all.We have created another pseudo-disease that is encouraged by vitamin companies, patient groups, food manufacturers public health departments and charities. Everyone likes to believe in a miracle vitamin pill and feels “they are doing something”.How vitamin D and fish oil affect risk of heart attack, stroke and cancer (Medical Xpress). After reading the previous article, here’s one to confuse you again. Another big study is trying to figure out if vitamin D and fish oil really do some good. So before taking them off your daily supplement routine, wait for this study to see if these popular pills actually have some science behind their purported benefits (or not).Massive trial shows limited value for popular supplements (Nature). The world’s leading journal weighs in on the controversy, saying, “No evidence found to indicate that vitamin D and fish oil fight cancer.” Both popular supplements also failed to show any benefit for preventing heart disease. This from a 5-year controlled trial involving 25,000 healthy men and women in their fifties and older.Is a low carb diet dangerous? (Medical Xpress). Athletes and the health conscious assiduously cutting their carbs to get fit might want to reconsider. Low carb diets might not only be useless; they could even be dangerous.Pasta. Sourdough. Mashed potatoes. If you are one of the legions of dieters out there who have been religiously cutting carbs in an attempt to get lean and fit, you may be surprised by a recent study that showed that low carb diets may not be healthy after all. In fact, they may be unsafe.Research presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Germany found that diets very low in carbohydrates may actually increase the risk of premature death over time. Yikes.Read the article to see why this is. Those tempted by the low-carb fad sometimes compensate by eating too much fat.Can chocolate, tea, coffee and zinc help make you more healthy? Scientists discover new protection against oxidative stress (Science Daily). Chocolate and caffeine used to be twin bogeymen of a poor diet. This article resuscitates them somewhat, arguing that adding zinc to the polyphenols in these foods could have a beneficial effect.No such thing as sugar highs, says pediatric endocrinologist (Medical Xpress). Parents who wish to argue with this expert might have to reconsider whether it’s really the sugar that makes kids hyper. It might be the excitement of Halloween candy and birthday parties that is doing it – not the sugar.“It’s a myth,” said Elizabeth Rosolowsky, a pediatric endocrinologist in the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry.“Parents may observe more energy in their kids after eating sugar, but it’s one of those self-fulfilling notions—a belief that comes true because we are acting like it’s true,” she said.Rosolowsky busts another myth, that sugar causes diabetes. It’s not the sugar, but the excess of carbs that gets stored as fat that predisposes some to become diabetics, she says.Food activates brown fat: How brown adipose tissue reacts to a carbohydrate-rich meal (Science Daily). Not all fat is bad. Brown fat is the “good fat,” experts think, because it produces energy instead of just storing it. The question is how to activate it. Believe it or not, exposure to cold, or a meal of carbohydrates, might be the key. Read the article before trusting it; the bottom line is that “further studies” are needed.Update 11/16/18: An article on Science Daily basically admits that scientists still do not know if dietary fat is good or bad.Jonathan Wells jokes in Zombie Science about evolving dietary advice. He likes eggs, but remembers when the experts all said that eggs are bad for you. Now, they are respectable again. He didn’t stop eating eggs, but now can feel less guilty about it. Have you had a similar experience? You try to eat what’s healthy, only to find out that something you believed was good for you is actually bad for you, or vice versa. Years ago the government pushed the “Food Pyramid.” It was posted in most schools. Recently, scientists exposed special interests behind the iconic diagram, and some think the pyramid should be inverted. If scientists cannot be sure about something as close to home as our bodies and our health, how can they pontificate about what the world and the universe were doing millions and billions of years ago? Let this be a lesson about science; it is always tentative. You can count on future findings to overturn some of the things that are taught as gospel truth today.In the meantime, it’s probably best to trust some of your common sense. Eat a variety of foods, don’t eat anything to excess, exercise as well as watching your diet, avoid fads, and remember that attitude is probably just as important as what you eat. (Visited 392 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

That’s one way to get ahead. — Heads of State (GCE041) — Geocache of the Week

first_imgPhotos and Video: Busted! Photo by geocacher MXTrekkerWatch out for the giant Beatles! Photo by geocacher Drew136Just “head” over to this cache to meet these folks. Photo by geocacher ArdentEnthusiastNot even Abe ‘nose’ what you’re looking for. Photo by geocacher Scorpios2931What little-known spots have you discovered by geocaching? Tell us in the comments.Continue to explore some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Check out all the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog.If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, just fill out this form. Thanks!Share with your Friends:More These fashionable gentlemen were always a’head’ of the curve. Photo by geocacher TresHntrsGeocache Name:Heads of State (GCE041)Difficulty/Terrain Rating:1/1Why this is the Geocache of the Week:There are some places that deserve to be seen. These rarely visited gems can be anything from a hidden pocket park to a piece of beautiful graffiti—or even a place full of giant presidential heads. However, you can’t always place a geocache there to bring people in. That’s where Virtual Caches come in. While a few rule changes made new Virtual Caches into Waymarks, some of the older Virtual Caches have been grandfathered in since they existed before the rule change. This spot, located in Houston, Texas, is where an artist sculpted and cast these presidential busts for use in a park near Mount Rushmore in South Dakota. You’ll also find sculptures of the Beatles here. What geocachers are saying:“I came down to Houston for the weekend to grab a bunch of challenge caches and virtuals…this one was on my list…..very cool place….added a few pictures to my log….thanks for bringing me here……TFTC!” – mightymouse21“Wow, this was a hoot! Detouring through Texas on our way to GeoWoodstock and had to stop at this one. Glad we did. Took pictures so we will post after we get back to Florida next week. Thanks for the adventure.” – Wilemon“Wow this is great…the things you get to see while geocaching, never would have come here or new about this had it not been for caching, thanks for placing!!” – Holn1b4IDie SharePrint RelatedOne for the Little People — Geocache of the WeekSeptember 5, 2018In “Community”The name says it all. — Director’s A-Mazing Treasure Hunt (GC3Y1GE) — Geocache of the WeekSeptember 10, 2014In “Community”Caching hot spots in Australia, according to Signal the Frog®January 16, 2018In “Community”last_img read more