Latest: Chelsea 1 Steaua Bucharest 0

first_imgChelsea took an early lead in their final Champions League group match courtesy of Daniel Georgievski’s 10th-minute own goal.Willian’s right-wing corner was headed towards goal by Oscar and with Demba Ba looking to apply the finishing touch, an under-pressure Georgievski appeared to knock the ball in.Already through to the knockout stage and knowing a victory would guarantee they progress as Group E winners, the Blues had made a strong start.David Luiz miscued after being found unmarked by Willian’s corner and Oscar fired wide from the edge of the penalty area before the opener.Luiz, who has been nursing a knee problem, was recalled to the side along with Ashley Cole – the duo’s first appearance since last month’s defeat at Newcastle.Oscar, lively in the opening 20 minutes, also returned after shaking off an ankle knock.The home side have been well on top but Steaua Bucharest should have equalised when Gabriel Iancu sneaked in behind John Terry and had only keeper Mark Schwarzer to beat but dragged his shot horribly wide.Chelsea: Schwarzer; Ivanovic, Luiz, Terry, Cole; Mikel, Lampard; Willian, Oscar, Hazard; Ba.Subs: Cech, Cahill, Ramires, De Bruyne, Mata, Schurrle, Torres.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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Play Your Part episode nine: synopsis

first_imgGet your sneak peek of episode nine of the Play Your Part television series, here:Lufefe Nomjana, known as the Spinach King, is one of the guests featured on episode nine of Play Your Part, broadcast on 4 November. (Image: Brand South Africa)Brand South Africa reporter Lufefe Nomjana was a volunteer at a community garden when he spotted a business opportunity. Using the vegetable spinach, he went on to build his company. He tells his story of how he became known as the Spinach King in this week’s Play Your Part.The episode, which is hosted by musician Kabelo Mabalane, airs on Saturday, 4 November 2017, at 18:00. It is part of a 26-episode series.Here’s more on the other two guests on this week’s episode:Avril SnymanAvril SnymanSnyman and her team talk about the growth of Lebone Village outside Bloemfontein. The village consists of five centres and benefits vulnerable children, youth and their families. Most of the children are affected by HIV and Aids.Matona Ntshona-SakupwanyaMatona Ntshona-SakupwanyaNtshona-Sakupwanya is the general manager of the marketing and communications department at The Innovation Hub, Gauteng’s innovation agency. She talks about how The Innovation Hub creates a platform to bring tech entrepreneurs, industry, academics, researchers and venture capitalists together.Play Your Part is broadcast at 18:00 on Saturdays on SABC 2.To get involved in playing your part in South Africa:Check out the conversation on Twitter: #GetInvolved; orFind out about initiatives on Play Your Part here.Tell us how you Play Your Part through our social media channels:Follow us on Twitter: @PlayYourPartSA;Follow Brand South Africa on Twitter: @Brand_SA;Like us on Facebook: Official Brand South Africa.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Historical marker notes where Ohio Farm Bureau began

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest  Leave a CommentIt was in Ohio State’s Botany and Zoology building on Neil Avenue, now Jennings Hall, where Farm Bureau members representing 76 counties along with many Ohio State University county Extension agents convened for the very first meeting of the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation 100 years ago. Now in that same location, a new historical marker commemorating that meeting is being displayed.“The fact that the meeting took place on the campus of The Ohio State University was appropriate,” said Ohio Farm Bureau President Frank Burkett III during the plaque unveiling Jan. 28. “At that first annual meeting, Ohio Farm Bureau pledged its support to its friends at Ohio State and as you can see, Ohio State University, its Extension service and Ohio Farm Bureau are lifelong partners.”The marker displays OFBF logos, past and present, and highlights how Farm Bureau adopted its first resolutions, pledging to support farm legislation, pressing for organization of a national Farm Bureau, supporting expansion of county Extension agent work and cooperating with Ohio State’s College of Agriculture and Experiment Station.“The work of the College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is crucial to the success of farmers and to every link in the food chain across Ohio, the nation and the world,” said Adam Sharp, OFBF executive vice president. “Today, just like 100 years ago, Farm Bureau knows the value of Ohio State’s teaching, research and extension efforts and we are proud to support those efforts by communicating with lawmakers, the public and others about the importance of that work.”Mark BervenOther representatives celebrating the organization’s founding included Mark Berven, Nationwide president and chief operating officer, and Brent Porteus, former OFBF president, who now serves on both the Nationwide Board of Directors and OSU Board of Trustees. Berven noted that Nationwide’s beginnings in 1926 all started as what was then known as the Ohio Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company.Sharp and Dr. Cathann Kress, vice president of agricultural administration and dean of the College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at Ohio State, highlighted the ability to work collaboratively for the betterment of both organizations and their communities.“You can’t easily accomplish something so ambitious as harnessing the only energy source for our planet, the sun, and converting it to use for the collective human species, who want it cheaply, fast, sustainable, delicious and high in value,” Kress said. “We have our own set of challenges today but we also have resources, technology and communications that our predecessors would have envied. That is why our partnership with Ohio Farm Bureau is so important. It was 100 years ago, it was 50 years ago and it is today.”Sen. Bob Peterson, center, presented a proclamation congratulating Ohio Farm Bureau on its 100th anniversary. Pictured are Adam Sharp (left) and Frank Burkett III.Also on hand was Ohio Senator and past OFBF President Bob Peterson. He presented a proclamation from the Ohio Senate recognizing the achievements of Ohio’s largest farm organization over the past century. Proclamations also were given by the Ohio House of Representatives and on behalf of U.S. Congressman Steve Stivers and the Ohio delegation of the U.S. House of Representatives.Online extrasLearn more about Ohio Farm Bureau’s centennial events, projectsCoverage from Ohio Farm Bureau’s 100th annual meetingTown Hall Ohio centennial episodePhotos by Dave Gore   Leave a Commentlast_img read more

Talking about Transitions

first_imgby Sara Croymans, MEd, AFCRecently, I had the opportunity to have a conversation with Jolaina Falkenstein, military Service member and a mental health professional, about military transitions. Jolaina is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT) with Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota where she provides individual, couples, and family therapy. In partnership with the Minnesota Department of Veteran Affairs, her clinic also provides free services to the Veteran population and their families. Jolaina is a Veteran and has served in the Army Reserves for over twenty years with two deployments to the Middle East. Currently in her military role as a Sergeant First Class, she supports the Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program; a mandated program designed to support and assist Reserve/Guard Service Members and their families through the pre-, during, and post-deployment process.Listen to the podcast of our conversation at militaryfamilieslearningnetwork.org/podcast/talking-about-transitions/.  This blog highlights a few nuggets from our conversation and provides a listing of the multiple resources Jolaina shared.In the podcast Jolaina emphasized that military transitions involve military Service members and families experiencing change in so many different areas of their lives. Being resilient in times of change involves looking for the positives in a situation. Jolaina encourages Service members, families, and military family service professionals to identify those positives – including the strengths, abilities and talents that Service members and families developed as a result of their experiences. Change can bring opportunities for growth.Jolaina shared one of her favorite quotes by C. JoyBell C. which speaks to change and resilience:The only way that we can live, is if we grow.The only way that we can grow is if we change.The only way that we can change is if we learn.The only way we can learn is if we are exposed.And the only way that we can become exposed is if we throw ourselves out into the open.Do it. Throw yourself.”― C. JoyBell CThroughout the podcast Jolaina shared multiple resources for a variety of groups.Resources/Strategies for Service members & families:• Military One Source – http://www.militaryonesource.mil/; provides resources, individualized consultations, coaching and counseling on many aspects of military life• County Veterans Service Officers (CVSO) promote and protect the rights of Service members and families through education, communication and technology. Locate CVSO across the nation on the National Association of County Veterans Service Officers website at https://www.nacvso.org/• Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) – https://www.va.gov/; the VA provides a variety of benefits and services and assistance to Service members, Veterans, their dependents and survivors.• Vet Centers – https://www.vetcenter.va.gov/; The Vet Centers, available through the VA, offer free services to Service members and their families –• Give an Hour – https://www.giveanhour.org; this national nonprofit organization coordinates local mental health professionals to provide free counseling services with military Service members• Strategies:                                                                                                                                                           o Become aware of community resources before they are neededo Build networks – Military Service members and families are    encouraged to reach out to other military families in your community to become acquainted and build relationships before deployments or other challenges occuro Participate in trainings – Service Members often times are required to participate in a variety of trainings, including Resiliency Training. Jolaina encouraged Service members to take time to think about how to apply the strategies identified in trainings to their life and to be sure to share the information and strategies with family membersResources/Strategies for Military Family Service Professionals:• Become familiar with and network with nationwide resources including those listed above. Building a network and relationships with other military family service professionals will increase your ability to work with Service members and their families.• Military Families Learning Network (MFLN) – https://militaryfamilieslearningnetwork.org; MFLN provides professional development and engagement opportunities for military family service professionalsResources/Strategies for Communities and their residents:• Build relationships and rapport with the military population in your community• Learn who military families are in your community and celebrate them, including military children• Neighbors are encouraged to get out of their homes and build relationships with military Service members and families• Continue to learn about military families and strategies to support them• Building Healthy Military Communities (BHMC) is a multi-year pilot project aims to better understand unique challenges faced by geographically dispersed Service Members and their families that may impact their readiness, resiliency, and well-being. The pilot is being conducted in Indiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Florida, Maryland, Minnesota and New Mexico.Jolaina can be reached at jolaina.falkenstein@gmail.com This post was written by Sara Croymans, MEd, AFC, University of Minnesota Extension Educator, and member of the MFLN Family Transitions team. Family Transitions provides education, resources and networking opportunities for professionals working with military families to build resilience and navigate life cycle transitions. Engage with the MFLN Family Transitions team on our website, Facebook, and Twitter.last_img read more

Nielsen Sells Four Magazines to Interweave

first_imgCraft and arts publisher Interweave—a unit of Loveland, Colorado-based Aspire Media—has acquired four arts-related magazines from Nielsen Business Media. The deal includes Nielsen’s American Artist, Drawing, Watercolor and Workshop magazines. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed.According Aspire CEO Clay Hall, the four magazines and their franchises are “a great expansion” upon Interweave’s current portfolio, and his team is “eager to begin offering advertising and marketing clients access to our expanded portfolio and other cross-media platforms. Our strategy is to build multi-media platforms around strong magazine franchises. Clearly, American Artist and its related publications fit like a glove with our mission and business strategy.”With a circulation of 41,000, American Artist was launched in 1937 and publishes 11 times per year. Drawing, Watercolor and Workshop magazines are quarterly. Aspire’s Interweave Press Publishing group includes 18 subscription magazines as well as several special-interest newsstand titles, and produces six annual craft enthusiast events.last_img read more

3 abducted Rohingyas rescued 3 more missing

first_imgRohingya refugee camp in Cox`s BazarPolice rescued three injured Rohingya men from a hilly jungle near the Chakmarkul camp in Teknaf upazila of Cox’s Bazar on Monday morning, but three of their fellows are still missing.The rescued are Mohammad Alam, 45, of Balukhali camp, and Abdul Khaleque, 23, and Mohammad Anwar, 33, of Kutupalong camp. Their throats were half-slit.The trio and their missing fellows were asked to get on a battery-run three-wheeler from Ukhia upazila’s Balukhali camp as they were promised jobs as day-labourers, Teknaf Model police station officer-in-charge Ranajit Kumar Barua told Prothom Alo.They were first taken to Chakmarkul camp and then to a nearby jungle, Ranajit said, adding that the abductors probably half-slit their throats to instill fear and realise ransom.On information, his team conducted the drive and rescued the three, the OC said.The rescued Rohingya men were primarily treated at a local hospital and then shifted to the Cox’s Bazar Sadar Hospital around 11:00am as their condition deteriorated. Police are conducting further drives in the hilly areas to rescue the missing Rohingya men.Two among the three rescued can hardly speak, but another cannot speak at all as his vocal cord has completely been slit, the OC added.Last month, Rohingyas and local criminals abducted a driver of an auto-rickshaw and demanded Tk 500,000 as ransom. Later, police rescued the driver.Cox’s Bazar additional police superintendent Mohammad Iqbal Hossain told Prothom Alo that the Rohingyas were committing various crimes.He thinks Rohingyas are involved in this incident as well.As many as 19 Rohingyas were killed in the past one year, all being murdered by fellow Rohingyas, Iqbal said.last_img

One year on MeToo sharply polarises US

first_img#MeToo hashtagThe #MeToo movement in one year has shaken the United States, brought down dozens of powerful men and threatens the confirmation of a Supreme Court judge, yet it has also become deeply polarizing and its long-term impact remains unclear.Accusations last October that Hollywood titan Harvey Weinstein engaged in decades of sexual assault, opened the floodgates with liberals still reeling from President Donald Trump’s 2016 election despite boasting that he groped women with impunity.But #MeToo, like almost everything in America these days, has proved divisive.And with Supreme Court pick Brett Kavanaugh accused of misconduct by three women in the 1980s, the polarization is becoming near hysterical.On Tuesday, Trump was cheered by supporters in Mississippi when he mocked Kavanaugh’s accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, provoking a furious backlash from Democrats and criticism from moderate Republicans.“It’s a very scary time for young men in America, where you can be guilty of something that you may not be guilty of,” he said earlier this week.“You have this backlash that many Republicans are feeling that if Kavanaugh is not confirmed, it allows this liberal movement to take precedence over their politics and concerns,” explained Melissa Deckman, professor of political science at Washington College in Maryland.Research indicates a gender gap—that women care more than men about sexual misconduct—but that party is the deciding factor, with Democrats caring more than Republicans.#MeToo spurred the ouster of Democratic lawmakers such as the popular Al Franken and John Conyers, hugely respected for his civil rights work.This 20 years after Bill Clinton survived allegations of sexual assault and harassment, as well as an attempt to remove him from office over a consensual affair with an intern that many now consider an abuse of power.‘Marathon, not a sprint’In an Alabama election last year, meanwhile, Republicans backed their guy despite accusations he molested teenage girls.With Kavanaugh, having a conservative judiciary appears to carries more weight with many in his camp than anything he may or may not have done as a teenager.#MeToo has been credited with spurring women to run for office in record numbers as Democrats hope next month’s midterm elections will strip Trump of his majority and elevate women into power.But a revolution remains a long way off.The best possible outcome in November is that women will make up 24 per cent of Congress, a US record and up from the current 19.3 per cent, a rate of representation still flagging far behind many in the developed world.“This is a marathon, not a sprint,” says Jean Sinzdak, associate director of the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University. “We are likely to see some gain… but we are not going to be at parity.”Women have come forward to vent their anger over harassment and assault that for years they kept quiet, humiliated and disbelieving that they would be heard. Instead now they are being heard, being believed and supported.There are signs attitudes are shifting. This year, Bill Cosby, once one of the most famous Americans in the world, was convicted of sexually assaulting a woman in 2004 and sentenced to at least three years in prison.‘Anything could happen’From police reopening a rape investigation into one of the biggest soccer stars on the planet, to ex-gymnastics USA doctor Larry Nassar being jailed for life, barely a day goes by when #MeToo is not front-page news.But the lasting impact is unclear.There has been growing pushback questioning whether all sexual misdemeanors should be treated with the same kick-them-to-the-curb attitude.An increasingly vocal segment believe the movement may have gone too far in ousting at least some men without the evidence to back up their accusations.“The effectiveness of the #MeToo movement and the long-lasting impact of it is largely dependent on men buying into it,” said Lisa Kimmel, president and CEO of the Canadian arm of US-based public relations firm Edelman.In American business circles, women account for fewer than four percent of board chairs in the S&P 1500.“It’s almost tone deaf if there is not a real commitment to enhance women in the workplace,” said Kimmel.And what of politics? How long will it take a viable woman presidential candidate to fare better than Hillary Clinton?“If things continue the way they are, you are going to have the same momentum in 2020 and women ready to throw their hats into the ring,” said Sinzdak. “But anything could happen, between now and then.”last_img read more

Man Killed In Welding Explosion In Kemah

first_img Share OSHA is on at scene at the Gulf Coast Trawl Doors. The 57 year old owner here was killed in a welding accident. #abc13 pic.twitter.com/70K3r6T8Vz— Pooja Lodhia (@PoojaOnTV) July 23, 2018A welding explosion in Kemah Monday night left a man dead. Local media outlets are reporting the man was welding a gas tank on a small boat.Galveston County deputies reportedly found the man with severe burns. He died at the hospital.The sheriff’s office has not yet confirmed the man’s name. Occupational Safety and Health Administration is reportedly looking into the explosion.last_img read more

Romance Under the Star lit Sky

first_imgThe month of romance calls for culinary delights curated with love. It’s the time of the year to treat your special someone to an intimate dinner, where you can experience a unique blend of crafted gourmet and unmatched luxury, for everlasting memories.Celebrate your eternal bond this Valentine’s Day as The Imperial makes their menus aphrodisiac. Make your moments eternal with Chef Veena Arora’s South-East Asian spread at ‘The Spice Route’ or head for a romantic culinary sojourn with a ‘Unique Dining Experience’ in intricately structured canopies, under a star lit sky at ‘San Gimignano lawns’ and ‘1911 lawns’. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfDesigned with precision and creatively crafted with flowers and oyster candles, the canopies offer an exclusive and a private dining affair with your beloved. ‘Daniell’s Tavern’ offers a divine interlude with authentic Pan-Indian flavors while ‘La Baguette’ – the French patisserie is all set to surprise your loved one with sinful desserts. A luxe romantic evening awaits you here!Chef Prem K Pogakula, Executive Sous Chef at The Imperial, New Delhi, says, “The menus at The Imperial for valentine’s day are hand-picked with exotic ingredients to keep the romantic mood flowing. The idea is to use more of local aphrodisiac ingredients to create a memorable experience through food. We have not only worked on the taste but a lot on the presentations across cuisines. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveWe have private canopies at ‘1911 Lawns’ and ‘San Gimignano Lawns’ to further conjure romance with opulence for an enchanting evening under the star lit sky, for our discerning guests. It is important to keep the flow going till the last bite of dessert.” 7:00pm to 11:45pm at The Spice Route | San Gimignano | 1911 restaurant6:30pm to 11:45pm at Daniell’s Tavern | 10:00am to 10:00pm at La Baguettelast_img read more

Crazy Insane Startups Are This Tech Investors Meat and Potatoes

first_img 5 min read Bryan Johnson, a serial tech entrepreneur turned investor, isn’t interested in finding the next buzzy startup like messaging app Snapchat. Sure, he hopes to make money. But unlike many venture capitalists, he doesn’t seek to underwrite frivolous companies whose biggest innovation is getting more people to click on ads. Johnson is instead attracted to ideas that seem insane and impossible.“I want to get a company from ‘crazy’ to ‘viable,’” Johnson told Fortune. “With today’s technology, we can now create in days, weeks or months what previous generations couldn’t do in a lifetime. Where DaVinci could sketch, we can build. Yet, we don’t have sufficient resources and people pursuing these goals.”On Monday, Johnson, who is best known as a founder of online payment processing company Braintree, announced that he has created a $100 million fund to invest in startups working on outlandish projects.He has already invested $15 million in seven startups. Planetary Resources, one of those companies, wants to spark an interstellar gold rush by mining asteroids for precious metals. Another called Vicarious wants to build a computer system that learns like the human brain. Human Longevity aims to lengthen the human life span to 120 years. Meanwhile, Matternet is fine-tuning a new kind of $3,000 drone for emerging markets and third-world countries.For every startup Johnson funds, he turns away many more — at least 95% of the ones he sees.“I invest in entrepreneurs who understand generally where the world is going, the enormous power of their tools and the enormous stakes that we have,” he says.In Matternet’s case, the Palo Alto startup certainly didn’t invent drones, but the company may be the first targeting the developing world. “You can’t get critical supplies to parts of Africa and Asia today — the roads are just too bad,” explains Johnson.Matternet CEO Andreas Raptopoulous contends people who will benefit most from drones won’t be Amazon customers (sorry, Jeff Bezos), but those who need food, medicine and other basic necessities in hard-to-reach places like Bhutan, where Matternet has already experimented with a prototype capable of traveling 15 miles carrying 4.4 lbs. of cargo. A 7.5 mile drive from Bhutan’s capital of Thimpu to a remote spot takes a car between 1 and 4 hours depending on weather and road conditions, but a Matternet drone accomplished the same trip in 14 minutes.Promising as ventures like Matternet are, Johnson recognizes he’s taking a serious risk as an investor. There’s little-to-no guarantee any of the startups he invests in will make it big. “It’s much harder to vet the likelihood of these companies than it is a web startup,” he admits. “You may have a 1 in 10 hit rate for someone building software for something. Here, you have a hit rate of 1 in 100 or 1 in 1,000.”That Johnson is plowing ahead anyway isn’t surprising to those who know him well. By the time he was nine, Johnson showed a penchant for exploration, traipsing the woods in and around Springville, Utah, where he grew up.“I think it’s the culmination of what he’s been working for his whole life,” says Candace Mouritsen, Johnson’s sister and an early employee at several of her brother’s startups.Rather than chase after his own interstellar dreams, Johnson became an entrepreneur. Two startups, including an Internet voice business, went bust by 2003. Two or three years later, Johnson drummed up the idea for a credit card processing system aimed at high-tech merchants. The smartphone market was in its infancy, and the credit industry then was plagued with what Johnson calls “unscrupulous” competitors.So he left his job working in a strategy group at Sears and started Braintree. Six years later, Braintree was processing $12 billion a year in payments from clients including Uber, Airbnb and OpenTable. The business was doing well enough such that suitors came knocking, and in the fall of 2013, PayPal acquired Braintree for $800 million.Now Johnson plans to use $100 million of his own cash for OS Fund, a name he coined that refers to the technical term “operating system.” Kitschy as it may sound to some, he wants to invest in startups developing products and services that radically improve quality of life. So when Johnson refers to the OS Fund, he’s not talking about some computer operating system, but what he dubs the “operating system of life.”If his investments seem unusual and far-flung, it’s with reason: Johnson avoids startups that are more bent on commercial success than addressing deeper societal challenges. And if Johnson comes across as downright eccentric because of his fund, so be it. He’ll also be in good company for now, joining a group of forward-thinkers behind Tesla, the high-performance electric carmaker, and Google’s research lab Google X, known for working on sci-fi projects like self-driving cars and glucose-tracking contact lenses.“I think the winds will shift,” Johnson says. “There will be a shift in the kinds of things people aspire to do. Funding and supporting hard problems will become cool in a company in a couple of years.”Spoken like a true futurist. Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global This story originally appeared on Fortune Magazine Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. October 20, 2014last_img read more