Earth Scientists React to Possible Loss of Russian GPS Stations

first_imgA Russian government threat to disconnect 11 GPS receivers used for geophysical research and to fine-tune the satellite navigation system is drawing concern from scientists—and questions from the country’s minister for industry.The threat is just one element of the tit-for-tat diplomatic and rhetorical firefight that has broken out between Russia and the United States in the wake of Russia’s annexation of Crimea in Ukraine. Last week, senior Russian officials said they were considering an array of moves aimed at U.S. space programs, including pulling out of the International Space Station in 2020 and barring the use of Russian rocket motors by U.S. firms. Officials also threatened to turn off 11 land-based GPS receivers on Russian soil by 1 June unless the United States agreed to install similar units for Russia’s GLONASS satellite navigation system on U.S. territory.Experts say the shutdown—if carried out—would have little impact on GPS. The passive stations, which only receive GPS signals, are primarily used to ensure correct tracking of GPS satellites. “As these stations are very few, their impact on the accuracy of the positional measurements is insignificant,” says Konstantin Kuimov, head of the Moscow State University department of astrometry and time service. “The accuracy of the positioning at present is the question of decimeters. Now, it would worsen a little bit.” GPS users won’t notice any change, he says.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The impact on science, however, could be a bit greater. That’s because earth scientists use data from the receivers to track the slow, subtle movements of continents and land surfaces. “The situation with geophysical measurement is much worse” because the receivers are vital to providing “a serious set of statistical data,” Kuimov says. “The statistical data makes it even possible to measure the variations in the rotation of the Earth and the seismic activity of the planet. It is only the positioning satellites that make it possible to measure the [movements] of the surface in millimeters.” Researchers use both navigation systems—GPS and GLONASS—to make such measurements, Kuimov notes. So he and other researchers would like to see GLONASS stations on U.S. territory (a move that has been under negotiation). Ideally, he says, such stations ultimately would be evenly spaced around the world.If Russia follows through with the threat, the impact will depend on how long the base stations remain inaccessible, says Jeffrey Freymueller, a geophysicist at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. “If the Russians eventually share the data, we’ll be able to reprocess everything and eventually recover full precision results, but if they actually remove the equipment for the long term then over time it will become an increasing problem, as it will compromise the global coverage,” Freymueller says. “Before there were these stations in Russia, for example, it was difficult to do large-scale tectonic studies in China because we could not define what was the stable Eurasian plate well enough to express motions relative to stable Eurasia. Eventually, we will slip back toward that situation if there is no continuing data from Russia, although we still have the past data so it will never be as bad as it was.”The threat to turn off the receivers “is a purely political decision,” Kuimov says. “No one needs it except politicians. In fact, it just demonstrates Russia’s disloyal attitude [toward] the U.S., in response to the disloyal attitude of the U.S. [toward] Russia.”The threat also appears to have sown discord within the Russian government. On 13 May, the day after the threat surfaced, Denis Manturov, Russia’s minister of industry and trade, suggested that it didn’t make sense. “Technically, it can be done,” he said. “But what is the purpose of that?”With reporting by Vladimir Pokrovsky, Andrey Allakhverdov, and Yudhijit Bhattacharjee.last_img read more

Century-old drug reverses signs of autism in mice

first_imgA single dose of a century-old drug has eliminated autism symptoms in adult mice with an experimental form of the disorder. Originally developed to treat African sleeping sickness, the compound, called suramin, quells a heightened stress response in neurons that researchers believe may underlie some traits of autism. The finding raises the hope that some hallmarks of the disorder may not be permanent, but could be correctable even in adulthood.That hope is bolstered by reports from parents who describe their autistic children as being caught behind a veil. “Sometimes the veil parts, and the children are able to speak and play more normally and use words that didn’t seem to be there before, if only for a short time during a fever or other stress” says Robert Naviaux, a geneticist at the University of California, San Diego, who specializes in metabolic disorders.Research also shows that the veil can be parted. In 2007, scientists found that 83% of children with autism disorders showed temporary improvement during a high fever. The timing of a fever is crucial, however: A fever in the mother can confer a higher risk for the disorder in the unborn child.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)As a specialist in the cell’s life-sustaining metabolic processes, Naviaux was intrigued. Autism is generally thought to result from scrambled signals at synapses, the points of contact between nerve cells. But given the specific effects of something as general as a fever, Naviaux wondered if the problem lay “higher up” in the cell’s metabolism.To test the idea, he and colleagues focused on a process called the cell danger response, by which the cell protects itself from threats like infection, temperature changes, and toxins. As part of this strategy, Naviaux explains, “the cells behave like countries at war. They harden their borders. They don’t trust their neighbors.” If the cells in question are neurons, he says, disrupted communication could result—perhaps underlying the social difficulties; heightened sensitivity to sights, sounds, and sensations; and intolerance for anything new that often afflict patients with autism.The key player may be ATP, the chief carrier of energy within a cell, which can also relay messages to other nearby cells. When too much ATP is released for too long, it can induce a hair-trigger cell danger response in neighboring neurons. In 2013, Naviaux spelled out his hypothesis that autism involves a prolonged, heightened cell danger response, disrupting pathways within and between neurons and contributing to the symptoms of the disorder.The same year, he and his colleagues homed in on the drug suramin as a way to call off the response. The medication has been in use since the early 20th century to kill the organisms that cause African sleeping sickness. In 1988, it was found to block the so-called purinergic receptors, which bind to compounds called purines and pyrimidines—including ATP. These receptors are found on every cell in the body; on neurons, they help orchestrate many of the processes impaired in autism—such as brain development, the production of new synapses, inflammation, and motor coordination.To determine if suramin could protect these receptors from overstimulation by ATP, Naviaux’s team worked with mice that developed an autism-like disorder after their mothers had been exposed to a simulated viral infection (and heightened cell danger responses) during pregnancy. Like children with autism, the mice born after these pregnancies were less social and did not seek novelty; they avoided unfamiliar mice and passed up the chance to explore new runs of a maze. In the 2013 paper, the researchers reported that these traits vanished after weekly injections of suramin begun when the mice were 6 weeks old (equivalent to 15-year-old humans). Many consequences of altered metabolism—including the structure of synapses, body temperature, the production of key receptors, and energy transport within neurons—were either corrected or improved.In the new study, published online today in Translational Psychiatry, the researchers found equally compelling results after a single injection of suramin given to 6-month-old mice (equivalent to 30-year-old humans) with the same autism-like condition. Once again, previously reclusive animals approached unknown mice and investigated unfamiliar parts of a maze, suggesting that the animals had overcome the aversion to novelty that’s a hallmark of autism in children. After the single injection, the team lowered the levels of suramin by half each week. Within 5 weeks most, but not all, of the benefits of treatment had been lost. The drug also corrected 17 of 18 metabolic pathways that are disrupted in mice with autism-like symptoms.Naviaux cautions that mice aren’t people, and therapies that are promising in rodents have a track record of not panning out in humans. He also says that prolonged treatment with suramin is not an option for children, because it can have side effects such as anemia with long-term use. He notes that there are 19 different kinds of purinergic receptors; if suramin does prove to be helpful in humans, newer drugs could be developed that would target only one or a few key receptors. The researchers are beginning a small clinical trial in humans of a single dose of suramin that they hope will be completed by the end of the year.The study is exciting, says Bruce Cohen, a pediatric neurologist at Akron Children’s Hospital in Ohio. “The authors have come up with a novel idea, tested it thoroughly, and got a very positive response after one dose.” He notes, however, that the mice with a few characteristics of autism don’t necessarily reflect the entire condition in humans. “Autism isn’t a disease. It’s a set of behaviors contributing to hundreds of conditions and resulting from multiple genes and environmental effects. Great work starts with a single study like this one, but there’s more work to be done.”last_img read more

Antarctic icebergs decimating seafloor life

first_imgA decade ago, the sea floor off the coast of the west Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) was a patchwork quilt of different colors and species. But now, icebergs are increasingly scouring the sea floor as they drift close to shore, fundamentally altering that rich ecosystem in the process. That’s the conclusion of a study reported this week in Current Biology. Each winter, the WAP sea surface freezes over, forming a skin of “fast ice” that holds back the bergs. But with climate change, the WAP is experiencing rapid regional warming, with fewer days each year of fast ice—letting the icebergs into the shallows more often, where they carve huge gashes through the habitat of the colorful, tentacled invertebrate animals carpeting the sea floor. The team examined the spatial distribution, diversity, and interactions between and within species from 1997 to 2013, along with scours from the ice each year. What it found was sobering: Most species weren’t able to recover from the increasingly frequent pounding by the ice. Instead, one species—a nondescript white mosslike animal encrusted on the rocks—emerged as an all-conquering winner, edging out the rest by its sheer ability to take a beating. It now has a near-monopoly in the area, the study found—and that could make the whole region more vulnerable to invading species.last_img read more

Why do humans grow up so slowly? Blame the brain

first_imgHumans are late bloomers when compared with other primates—they spend almost twice as long in childhood and adolescence as chimps, gibbons, or macaques do. But why? One widely accepted but hard-to-test theory is that children’s brains consume so much energy that they divert glucose from the rest of the body, slowing growth. Now, a clever study of glucose uptake and body growth in children confirms this “expensive tissue” hypothesis.Previous studies have shown that our brains guzzle between 44% and 87% of the total energy consumed by our resting bodies during infancy and childhood. Could that be why we take so long to grow up? One way to find out is with more precise studies of brain metabolism throughout childhood, but those studies don’t exist yet. However, a new study published online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) spliced together three older data sets to provide a test of this hypothesis.First, the researchers used a 1987 study of PET scans of 36 people between infancy and 30 years of age to estimate age trends in glucose uptake by three major sections of the brain. Then, to calculate how uptake varied for the entire brain, they combined that data with the brain volumes and ages of more than 400 individuals between 4.5 years of age and adulthood, gathered from a National Institutes of Health study and others. Finally, to link age and brain glucose uptake to body size, they used an age series of brain and body weights of more than 1000 individuals from birth to adulthood, gathered in 1978.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The researchers, led by Christopher Kuzawa, an anthropologist at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, found that when the brain demands lots of energy, body growth slows. For example, the period of highest brain glucose uptake—between 4.5 and 5 years of age—coincides with the period of lowest weight gain. This strongly suggested that the brain’s high energy needs during childhood are compensated for by slower growth.“This is a very, very cool paper,” says Karin Isler, a biological anthropologist at the University of Zurich in Switzerland. “It very convincingly shows that the conflicting demands of the brain’s and the body’s energy requirements for growth are met, in humans, by a temporal sequence of delayed growth.”The expensive tissue hypothesis was first proposed in 1995 by anthropologists Leslie Aiello of New York’s Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research and Peter Wheeler of the United Kingdom’s Liverpool John Moores University. Although it was initially thought that bigger brains were supported by smaller digestive systems, later studies revealed that other mechanisms could also be at work. Isler and primatologist Carel Van Schaik from the University of Zurich suggested that energy-rich diets, delayed growth and reproduction, and energy-efficient locomotion could also help feed the energy-hungry brain. Humans show signs of all three: We cook our food and eat meat, boosting caloric intake; we grow up more slowly and reproduce later; and we walk on two feet, saving energy compared with quadrupedal chimpanzees. The PNAS study supports the trade-off between delayed growth and larger brains, Isler says.The ideal next step would be to see if a similar trade-off with growth happens in other primates, too. But that will hard, Kuzawa says. “Obtaining PET data on brain glucose use across the full growing years in other closely related primates would be fascinating but difficult, and likely impossible for the more relevant comparative species like chimpanzees,” he says.*Correction, 26 August, 11:56 a.m.: An earlier version of the story incorrectly stated that the study sample sizes were 400 and 1000, although they were higher. The article has been amended to reflect this.last_img read more

Why are these massive planets so close to their suns?

first_imgThe huge gas-swaddled planet 51 Pegasi b orbits just 7.5 million kilometers from its parent star (a distance about one-eighth the size of Mercury’s orbit)—so close, in fact, that its “year” lasts just 4 Earth days or so. Other such “hot Jupiters” orbit their suns even closer than that. Ever since this odd class of planets was first discovered about 2 decades ago, scientists have wondered how gas giants, a type of planet found only in our outer solar system, end up in orbits so exceedingly close to their parent stars? Previous studies have suggested that gravitational interactions with other large planets in their solar systems created orbital chaos that drove them inward from a more distant orbit. A new analysis supports that notion. Researchers used software to simulate the planetary motions within a two-planet system: one being a Jupiter-sized planet (depicted in the artist’s concept above) orbiting its parent star at about the same distance Earth orbits the sun, and the other a large planet in a highly tilted orbit that was slightly larger. Over a simulated interval of 200 million years, the inner planet slowly migrated even farther inward to become a “warm Jupiter” orbiting its parent star at about the same distance Mercury does in our solar system, the researchers report online today in Science. (Previous studies have identified six distant solar systems that include both a warm Jupiter and a large companion planet in a highly tilted orbit, the researchers note.) Over the life of a star, which can last billions of years, continued gravitational interactions with the other large planet in the system could drive a warm Jupiter even closer to its parent star, converting it into a hot Jupiter.last_img read more

Teen Vogue Names Indian American Samhita Mukhopadhyay its First Executive Editor

first_img“I am deeply impressed with Teen Vogue’s coverage of the most important issues impacting young women’s lives today, as well as with (chief content officer Phillip Picardi’s) leadership,” Mukhopadhyay said in a statement. “I am honored and excited to help lead this vibrant and inspired team to expand and deepen their coverage on everything from body positivity, fashion, pop culture, Black Lives Matter, college sexual assault and more,” the Indian American journalist added.Read it at Indiawest Related Itemslast_img read more

Paisa Pheko Tamasha Dekho!!

first_imgShocking! Unthinkable! Unbelievable! The older generation is either reaching for the smelling salts, jumping out of its skin or frothing in righteous indignation. The younger generation just can’t have enough. The TV channels are freaking out beaming it. The entertainment media are splashing it in color, big time. And the subjects (objects?) under discussion openly confess that they haven’t had so much fun — with their clothes on, at least — ever, while bogeying their way to the bank. Yup, guys, we are talking about the sudden blitz n’ boom of A-listers in B-town shakin’ it up, big time, at any event or happening anywhere on planet Earth — for the right bag of Big Bucks. King Khan reportedly slung one out when this trend was a toddler with “I am a Bhand (street entertainer). Anyone can hire me for a price!” With that, he led by example to dance away merrily at hi-profile weddings and events across the globe. Very soon others followed and today almost every star is busy dancing away to glory — to the offer of cool moolah — from Borivali to Boston!  Karina KapoorIt wasn’t always like this. Says one veteran Bolly-tracker, Siddeshwar Dayal: “My God, what’s going on today would be considered sacrilege, blasphemous and downright cheap by the earlier generation. This sentiment was shared by the stars too and they considered it unthinkable — infra dig — and totally inappropriate to mix art with public entertainment — of the dhin-chak kind.” He recalls the interesting case of the diva, Vyjantimala, “the first screen heroine to dance at the Filmfare Awards function — but with the firm condition and proviso that it remains totally classical.” Later, when Hema Malini and Asha Parekh came into this scene, he adds, they too insisted on these ground rules, strictly art. Once, in 1970 in the West Indies, when enthusiastic fans urged Vyjantimala to do her racy “Buddha Mil Gaya” number from Sangam on stage, she stormed off in a huff. Ditto Hema, two years later in Trinidad.Today, the diametrically opposite seems to be true. In a fan-driven, sponsor-led and money-mad universe, stars pretty much dance to the checks. Why? While some point to the recession and believe the quick bucks are comfort when no movies are on the kitty, others are convinced it’s a sign of the times when everything — even stars — are up for sale. As always, the candid Mahesh Bhatt has no problem with the dance-for-cash routine whatsoever and says it’s a fall-out of the consumerist and brand-driven times we live in. The world is a mall and guys with the money and inclination are free to pick up big-buck brands of their choice, for their own reasons. It has nothing to do with ethics or morality for christ’s sake! Others believe that if a Shah Rukh Khan, Bipasha Basu, Aishwarya Rai, Kareena Kapoor, Akshay Kumar or Salman Khan, by dancing and performing, brings joy and happiness to a set of people, what’s wrong? And so what if the clientele comprise Gutka-kings, hot-shot exporters, stinking-rich business tycoons or fat-cat jewellers c’mon guys, they are entitled to their version of fun and exhibitionism, right? As a perceptive trend-watcher, Patha Chatterjee comments: “Earlier you had royal patronage. Today corporates have taken that place with events, fashion shows, product launches, et. al. blitzing the scene. In this totally commercial space, what’s wrong if weddings, anniversaries, sangeets, birthdays, engagements or special events join in? It’s a personal thing between Mr. Big Shot Industrialist and the Star. Where does Mr. Virtuous with the whole conscience, morality and ethics crap come in, anyway?” Social Commentator Achal Singh however begs to differ: “We all know how incredibly popular B-town stars are and the impact they have on the collective, popular imagination of one and all. The leading lights bring with them image, persona and brand equity. This suggests that along with the glamour and entertainment quotient, they also have a basic sense of dignity with which they conduct their public life. To dance at the drop of a hat wherever the money is good (birthdays, weddings, parties, events of the super rich) is to devalue and trivialize their ‘aura,’ downsizing them to nothing more than a performer-on-sale. This cheapens both the star and the profession, completely ruins the mystique and charisma of stardom and eliminates any sense of respect fans have for them.”  Malaika Arora Khan We all have heard of the obscene amounts that Katrina Kaif, Malaika Arora Khan and Priyanka Chopra were offered to do jigs at recent New Year bashes … should they have accepted and done it? Frankly, it’s a real tough call. In today’s uncertain Showbiz scene where each Friday is a chilling story of the luck of the draw, getting more for less shouldn’t be considered a sin, say one section of the crowd. However, the older gen flash big toothless grins when they hear that some of today’s hottest golden kids of B-town, Ranbir Kapoor, Imran Khan and Sonakshi Sinha will never ever go that route. As the local wit said, “From cricketers to cattle (thanks to the IPL Auction) is bad enough. From Big Screen Stars to Nautankis and Cabaret Girls is tooooo much yaar!”  Related Itemslast_img read more

Winter Soldiers: How The Ice Stupa Team Is Saving Glaciers The World Over

first_imgWhen Sonam Wangchuk, an education activist and engineer, invited crowd-funding on the internet for his Ice Stupa project back in 2014, he wrote in his usual cheeky flair: “It only makes sense to invite global contribution to help solve the problems we are facing here in the mountains, since whether we like it or not, we receive more than our fair share of the impact of your other global (warming) contributions.”The good-natured jibe aside, he is right. The beginnings of climate change are experienced clearly in the mountainous regions. It is seen in their receding glaciers, erratic run-off streams that local communities depend on, and meltwater lakes, which are dammed precariously by moraines and lead to flooding when the compressed sediments are unable to hold back the huge volume of water. The flooding of glacial meltwater lakes is a real threat all over the world — from the Himalayas to the Andes in Peru.The alarming receding of glaciers that was causing a water crisis in the desert mountains of Ladakh made Sonam Wangchuk step in with his Ice Stupa project. Wangchuk, like most inhabitants of the region, realized that there was too much water in winter when they don’t need it, and too little during the farming season when the farmers rely on melting snow to grow wheat, barley and vegetables.The Ice Stupa ProjectThe ice stupa, Wangchuk had told a group of volunteers, which the author was a part of, is a thing of “functional beauty”. “Ice stupas are important in more ways than one,” Wangchuk said. “They can be used to green mountain deserts, mitigate disaster, and restore livelihood of mountain communities. They also work as a tourist attraction.”Shaped like a Buddhist stupa, the ice stupa is a structure built to combat the mountain desert’s water crisis. The ice structure, adorned with sea buckthorn bushes and prayer flags, and dominating the Ladakhi village of Phyang, can store up to 1.7 million liters of water. The idea is that the water released by the glaciers in the pre-farming season can be stored in the form of an ice structure and released during the summer months when the farmers need it. With the ice structure’s capacity to store water, the water can not only be used for farming but also to effectively green the deserts. As of now, 5,000 willow trees are growing under the patronage of the ice stupa.The idea came from a civil engineer, Chewang Norphel, who wanted to store the glacial run-off water by grafting ice terraces. Norphel diverted the water from the main glacial streams via canals to catchment areas that are shaded from the sun. Ice terraces, however, came with limitations. They needed to be higher in altitude, and villagers were required to regularly climb up the mountain to maintain it. Also, come summer and they would have little control over the melting of water.Wangchuk merely sought ways to improve Norphel’s artificial glacier design. The engineer, on whom the character of Aamir Khan was based in the hit Hindi film, 3 Iditos, realized that by reducing the surface area exposed to the sun and warm winds, the ice structure can last longer — even at lower altitudes. How an ice stupa works is simple.“Water maintains its level. If, say, water is piped 30 m upstream, it would rise 30 m from the ground when it reaches the village. Since the pipe is upstream, the water flows down to the village because of gravity,” Wangchuk’s video uploaded on his YouTube page explains. As the water jets out from the pipe, which is narrower at the opening (picture a hose) in Ladakh’s winter nights with temperatures close to -40 degree Celsius, the water freezes by the time it reaches the ground.The sea buckthorn plants help scatter the droplets, making it easier for water to freeze as it comes down. The ice forms layer by layer on the dome structure built by volunteers who come to work on the project during Ladakh’s harsh winters. The dome structure which has plastic sheets, distributes the weight evenly, as the ice rises to the sky, taking the natural shape of a cone.True to his blithe demeanor, Wangchuk admitted candidly that the prayer flags on the ice stupa have less to do with religion and more with the fact that it breaks warm wind. At 78.4 feet, the ice stupa made this year is one of the tallest man-made ice structures.Tackling Glacial Meltwater Lakes — From Sikkim to PeruLike the Lake Palcacocha in Peru, the Lhonak Lake in Sikkim was considered dangerous for years. In 2013, scientists from the National Remote Sensing Centre published a report in the Current Science journal, saying that the meltwater lake formed, dammed by loose soil and glacial debris, in northern Sikkim could cause devastation downstream.In 2016, the Sikkim government approached Wangchuk for help with Lhonak Lake. Around that time, Wangchuk had publicly criticized the handling of the Phugtal flash floods in Zanskar region by the National Disaster Management Authority. He had asked the government agencies not to blast the debris holding the lake formed in Phugtal and instead siphon the water off to drain the lake. His advice was ignored, and while people downstream were evacuated, the eventual flash flood caused by blasting the debris destroyed 12 bridges and fields of villagers.The Sikkim government wanted Wangchuk to use the siphon technique to drain the water from Lhonak lake to make the threat of flash floods in the state impotent.In September 2016, Wangchuk and his Ice Stupa team, along with help from the military, embarked on a three-week expedition and installed three pipes to drain the Lhonak lake. The idea then struck him that the water that has been siphoned off can be used to re-glaciate the region by making ice stupas. The team hopes to implement it in Sikkim, and in Andes, Peru, as well.The initial groundwork was done in Phinaya, Peru, in August this year. Surya Balasubramanium and Darren Thomas Clark, from the Ice Stupa team, went on a recce, and tested the capabilities of water cannon for ice formation and the capability of the ice to survive the hot days in Peru. They came back from the recce, flushed with success. Clark wrote about it on his Facebook page: “Despite the unfavorably warm conditions near Phinaya, Peru (Altitude 5000 meters, 17,000 ft.), we were able to build 2 glacier bases in two nights. We proved that our techniques for building glaciers can work in the Andes, and we will be back next year for a full scale build in the best location possible.”Peru will have a full scale ice stupa next year to mitigate the risks of glacial meltwater lakes.The MortAlive ProjectMorteratsch Glacier, one of Switzerland’s prime attractions, is seeing a yearly loss of 15 million tonnes of ice. This is where the MortAlive Project, which started independently under Prof Hans Oerlemans, comes in. The project creates an artificial snow cover for the glacier in summer to delay the retreat of the glacier. “Our studies show that in 20 years we can build back the glacier to how it is now,” Balasubramanium, who is now part of the project, says.The artificial snow-making and ice stupas are being used in conjunction so that the team can do more than slow down the glacier’s retreat. “This winter, it will be built near the Morteratsch Bahnhof, one of the stops of the Glacier Express train,” Balasubramanium told Little India.The first ice stupa of Switzerland was built in Van Rosel last winter. The design from Ladakh was adapted slightly in Switzerland, with the team using live twigs. “As expected, the twigs were alive and growing again when the ice started melting,” Balasubramanium added.Not just for tourism, ice stupas are being planned in the country as a water solution for alpine huts.This winter, the ice stupa built in Ladakh is expected to have an additional snow cover to delay its melting and to make it more attractive as a tourist spot.As climate change bares its teeth as a reality, the world is coming together to fight the effects, one ice stupa at a time. Related Itemsartificial glacierglacier graftingIce stupaice stupa Ladakhice stupa Switzerlandice stupa Van RoselLittle IndiaMortAlive projectSonam Wangchuklast_img read more

Tata Steel, Thyssenkrupp Finalize European Joint Venture

first_imgIndia’s Tata Steel has signed a deal with the German group Thyssenkrupp for a joint venture that will create Europe’s second largest steel-maker. The 50-50 joint venture, which will be named Thyssenkrupp Tata Steel, will employ about 48,000 workers, Reuters reported.The agreement follows the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding in September 2017. The new firm firm will have annual sales of about £13 billion, and the group expects to make costs savings of between £350m and £440m a year, according to the BBC.The company, based in the Netherlands, will form Europe’s second-largest steelmaker after ArcelorMittal, which was created when Mittal took over Arcelor in 2006.“The joint venture will create a strong pan-European steel company that is structurally robust and competitive,” Natarajan Chandrasekaran, the chairman of Tata Steel, said in a statement.We’ve signed definitive Joint Venture agreements with @thyssenkrupp_en to create a new steel champion in Europe. Thyssenkrupp Tata Steel BV will be positioned as a leading pan European high quality flat steel producer. #FutureOfSteel https://t.co/fwgerFewn6 pic.twitter.com/gxFn3dymbG— Tata Steel (@TataSteelLtd) June 30, 2018“We will create a highly competitive European steel player – based on a strong industrial logic and strategic rationale. We will secure jobs and contribute to maintaining value chains in European core industries,” Thyssenkrupp CEO Heinrich Hiesinger said. “The joint venture with Tata Steel is an important milestone for the transformation of Thyssenkrupp to an industrials and service group and will lead to a significant improvement of the financial figures of Thyssenkrupp, effective with closing,” Thyssenkrupp said in a statement. The definite agreement would be signed shortly, it added.The merger was earlier feared to result in 4,000 job cuts, the BBC report said, adding that workers had been asking for protection of the future of Tata’s UK plant at Port Talbot in south Wales, which employs 4,000 people.The two companies will now jointly invest in Tata’s Port Talbot facility, according to Bloomberg. All job agreements have been extended till Oct.1, 2026, the report added.The transaction is subject to merger control clearance in several jurisdictions, including the European Union.The announcement comes as the European steel makers are facing 25 percent tariff on exports to the United States, which is their biggest market.The merger, which has been in the works for about a year, had earlier faced criticism in Germany over the decision to move the company headquarters to the Netherlands, and fear of job losses. Thyssenkrupp was also under pressure from some investors like Elliott Management Corp. and Cevian, which wanted the German firm to seek better terms in the deal, since Tata recorded low profits from its European steel ventures. Related ItemsEuropetata steelThyssenkrupplast_img read more

Supreme Court stays Bombay High Court order to file FIR against Dhananjay Munde

first_imgThe Supreme Court on Friday stayed a Bombay High Court order directing registration of a First Information Report against Maharashtra MLC and NCP leader Dhananjay Munde in an alleged illegal purchase of government land case.A Vacation Bench of Justices Ajay Rastogi and Surya Kant also issued notices to the Maharashtra government and the complainant in the case, Rajabhau Phad.During the hearing, the Bench queried, “what was the exceptional feature in the case” that led the High Court to order the registration of the FIR.In his petition, Mr. Munde, sought stay of the High Court order that directed the police to file a case against him for allegedly grabbing land at Pus village, Ambajogai taluk, Beed district belonging to government.The top court, however, declined to go into the merits of the case as of now.Earlier in the morning, the Beed police lodged a case of cheating and forgery against Mr. Dhananjay Munde and 14 others in the case.An FIR under Sections 420 (cheating), 465 (forgery), 468 (forgery for the purpose of cheating), 464 (false document) and 471 (using as genuine a forged document) of the Indian Penal Code (IPC) was lodged against Mr. Munde and the others at the Bardapur police station.The police action follows a June 11 order of the Aurangabad Bench of the Bombay High Court, directing an FIR to be registered against Mr. Munde, who is Leader of Opposition (LoP) in the Maharashtra Legislative Council (MLC), within four days of the court order.The court had passed the directive on a petition filed by Mr. Phad, who had accused the NCP leader of illegally purchasing land for his Jagmitra sugar factory in Beed district.According to Mr. Phad’s petition, the disputed plot of land at Pus village in Beed’s Ambejogai tehsil belonged to the State government and was given to the Belkhandi Math in Beed as a ‘gift’ to its chief priest or mahant, Ranit Giri.In 2012, Mr. Munde had purchased the 17-acre plot from Mr. Giri’s heirs by applying for non-agricultural status of the land.The petitioner had challenged the purchase, stating that as the land originally belonged to the government, it could not be sold to anybody.Stressing that the land for the Jagmitra Sugar Mills was purchased “in strict accordance to rules,” Mr. Munde has refuted the allegations against him, stating that “misleading information” was presented against him in the court.He has alleged that Mr. Phad’s complaint against him smacked of “political vendetta.”The NCP leader said that Mr. Phad, who is the son-in-law of scam-tainted businessman Ratnakar Gutte, was attempting to frame him as he had exposed the farm loan fraud allegedly committed by Mr. Gutte, a prominent sugar baron from the Marathwada region considered to be close to the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party.Mr. Munde’s lawyers have said that there was no mention of the land belonging to the government at the time of the purchase in 2012.This is not the first time the NCP leader has found himself in a soup over shadowy dealings.In October 2013, the Beed District Central Co-operative Bank had lodged a complaint pertaining to fraudulent behaviour against Mr. Munde and 15 others at the Parli police station in Beed.The BDCC had alleged Mr. Munde, as chairman and director of the Parli-based Jagmitra Co-operative Cotton Ginning and Pressing Mill, had taken loans from the bank amounting to ₹11.79 crore between 2003 and 2011 and had failed to repay them. Despite the lodging of an FIR and the filing of a charge sheet against the NCP leader, a local court had stayed Mr. Munde’s arrest.last_img read more

Phagu Chauhan sworn in as Bihar Governor

first_imgPhagu Chauhan was on Monday sworn in as the 40th Governor of Bihar, an official said. The 71-year-old Mr. Chauhan succeeded Lalji Tandon, who is now the Governor of Madhya Pradesh. He was administered the oath by Patna High Court Chief Justice Amreshwar Pratap Sahi at a programme held at Raj Bhawan here in the presence of Chief Minister Nitish Kumar and deputy CM Sushil Kumar Modi, besides several ministers.Mr. Chauhan, a six-time MLA from Ghosi Assembly constituency in Uttar Pradesh’s Mau district, had resigned from the UP Assembly on Friday. After having won the Assembly election for the first time in 1985 on a Dalit Mazdoor Kisan Party (DMKP) symbol, he returned as an MLA again in 1991 on a Janata Dal ticket. He won the seat in 1996 and 2002 on the BJP symbol.Mr. Chauhan again won Ghosi in May 2007 on a Bahujan Samaj Party ticket but later returned to the saffron party and won the Assembly election for the sixth time in March 2017.last_img read more

Those conspiring for President’s Rule in Maharashtra are insulting people’s mandate: Sanjay Raut

first_imgSenior Shiv Sena leader Sanjay Raut on Wednesday claimed there was a “consensus” between the BJP and his party before the Maharashtra Assembly elections on sharing the chief minister’s post.Amid the stalemate continuing over government formation in the state, Mr. Raut told reporters here that no fresh proposal has been received from the BJP or sent to it.He claimed farmers and the working class want a Shiv Sena chief minister and have hopes and expectations from the Uddhav Thackeray-led party.To a question on when there would be a consensus on the chief minister’s post, the Rajya Sabha member said, “There was a consensus on the post before elections.”Ruling out any new proposal for government formation, Mr. Raut reiterated that the Shiv Sena expects implementation of what was decided and agreed upon before the elections.“Why waste time on new proposals. We want a discussion on what was agreed upon earlier. No new proposal has been received or sent,” he said.On the possibility of imposition of President’s rule in the state, Mr. Raut said, “We will not be responsible for it. Those conspiring to do this are insulting the people’s mandate.”He said wherever Uddhav Thackeray and his son Aaditya Thackeray, who won the state polls from Worli seat in Mumbai, were touring to review crop losses due to unseasonal rains, the farmers and working class were looking at the party with hopes and expectations.“All are eager to have chief minister from the Shiv Sena,” he said.Mr. Raut refused to respond to a question on whether the NCP has agreed to share the chief minister’s post. “We will talk about it,” he said.The Sharad Pawar-led NCP on Tuesday said a political alternative can be worked out in the state if the Shiv Sena declared that it had snapped ties with the BJP.Sources in the NCP said their party wants Arvind Sawant, the lone Shiv Sena minister in the Union government, to resign before going ahead further with the Sena.There has been no headway in government formation after results of the state polls were declared on October 24.The BJP, which won 105 seats, and the Shiv Sena, which bagged 56 seats, are locked in a bitter tussle over sharing of the chief minister’s post and ministerial portfolios in new government, even 13 days after the Assembly poll verdict handed them enough seats to cobble up a coalition government.They won 161 seats together in the 288-member House, much above the halfway mark of 145.Besides, the opposition NCP won 54 seats while the Congress got 44 seats.last_img read more

Hayward, in blog post, expresses thanks for support

first_imgPBA board opts not to renew Narvasa’s term as commissioner Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. AP FILE PHOTOBOSTON — Gordon Hayward of the Boston Celtics says he knows he will not play again this season, after needing surgery to repair a grotesque leg injury on opening night last month.The announcement, on Hayward’s Facebook page, came as little surprise given the severity of the injury. Hayward wrote about several previously unrevealed aspects of the injury and the aftermath, including how four people — including Celtics coach Brad Stevens — were needed to carry him onto the plane that night in Cleveland, and how even former President Barack Obama has been among those sending well-wishes for his recovery.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Read Next MOST READ Senators rally support for Robredo; laud her for accepting anti-drug post PLAY LIST 02:46Senators rally support for Robredo; laud her for accepting anti-drug post00:50Trending Articles02:29Giannis Antetokounmpo powers Bucks in bounce back win over Celtics01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA View comments “I honestly can’t say enough about everyone’s kindness,” Hayward wrote.Hayward is expected to hold a news conference at the Celtics’ facility in Waltham, Massachusetts, on Thursday. He also has taped an interview that will appear Thursday on NBC’s “Today.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutHayward was injured about 5 minutes into the opener at Cleveland, a shocking end to a season of great expectations. Hayward was one of the marquee prizes of free agency this past summer, leaving Utah and signing with Boston to chase an NBA title and reunite with Stevens, his college coach at Butler.“I keep imagining what it’s going to be like to step onto the floor at the Garden, and make my regular season debut as a Celtic,” Hayward wrote. “It’s going to be a little delayed. But with each day of my rehab, I’ll be that much closer to making it happen. I’m already dreaming about sharing that moment with everyone here in Boston.” Hayward said when he saw his foot pointing the wrong way after his awkward landing, the pain was not initially very intense. It was, however, when doctors tending to him on the floor tried to re-set his ankle.“The moment they did it, there was just a massive shot of pain, probably the most pain I’ve ever felt in my life,” Hayward wrote.The Celtics lost in Cleveland that night, and Hayward was with the team for the flight home. The Celtics played their home opener the next night, while Hayward was in surgery.“On the flight back, my teammates all came by to encourage me,” Hayward wrote. “It was very emotional for me to see how all of these new teammates of mine, guys who I had only spent a few weeks with at that point, were so sincere about their concern for me. Their support has at times overwhelmed me and it will not be forgotten.”Hayward said he’s heard from plenty of stars from the NBA and other sports, like NFL stars Odell Beckham Jr. and J.J. Watt, retired Lakers great Kobe Bryant — and Oklahoma City’s Paul George, who also had a horrible fracture while playing for USA Basketball in 2014.ADVERTISEMENT Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa “He knows better than anyone, maybe, exactly what it is I’m going through, and will be going through,” Hayward wrote. “I’m thankful that he reached out right away, and that’s he’s someone I can continue to talk to.”As for Obama, who is a huge basketball fan?“That was a pretty big deal,” Hayward said.Hayward said it was difficult at first to watch Celtics games, knowing he couldn’t play. But he’s started watching, and hopes to have some sort of role the rest of the season.“I know I can’t help them physically on the court, but I am going to do everything in my power to support my teammates and coaches in every way imaginable,” Hayward wrote. “Whether it’s breaking down film or just providing leadership and guidance, I can’t wait to give back. I’ve already received so much.” Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillionlast_img read more

Ingram, Randle lead Lakers over Suns

first_img2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting Josh Hart tallied his third consecutive double-double in as many starts. He has scored 44 and brought down 36 rebounds in that stretch.Randle said the team has started jokingly calling him Charles Barkley because he’s rebounding at such a high rate at his size.“He’s great, especially from that guard position, coming in and helping the bigs get boards,” Randle said. “He’s huge for us.”UP NEXTSuns: Host the San Antonio Spurs on Wednesday.Lakers: Host the Oklahoma City Thunder on Thursday. Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City The Lakers overcame a sluggish start to the second quarter and a 16-6 run by the Suns. Los Angeles made only two of its first 10 shots, and Phoenix took a 50-43 lead on a jump shot by Warren to cap a 22-8 run over nearly seven minutes.Los Angeles answered with a 10-2 run that included Brook Lopez making a 3-pointer after blocking Jackson’s dunk attempt and Ingram making a 3 to give Los Angeles a 53-52 lead with 2:29 left in the half. The game was tied at 57 at halftime.Ingram’s ferocious slam gave Los Angeles an 84-77 lead with 1:59 remaining in the third. His two free throws gave the Lakers a nine-point lead entering the fourth quarter, and Kuzma’s slam dunk sent the crowd into a frenzy and the Lakers into a 95-85 lead with 9:08 remaining in the game.The Lakers held the Suns to just 14 points in the final period, and closed the final 5:27 on an 8-0 run.TIP-INSSuns: Lost their third straight game, and their 12th of their last 13. . Made only 56.5 percent of their free throws. . Marquese Chriss added 10 points and six rebounds.Lakers: Lonzo Ball missed his 11th straight game with a sore left knee. . Outscored Phoenix 25-11 in fast-break points. . Won their seventh straight home game. . Improved to 7-4 without Ball in the lineup.BOOKER OUTSuns guard Devin Booker missed Tuesday’s game with an injury to his left hip.He was hurt in Sunday’s 115-110 loss to the Charlotte Hornets and left the game. He did not practice Monday.Triano said before the game that things change “drastically” without Booker.“He’s a guy that we’ve played at so many different positions,” Triano said. “He’s handled the ball for us in a variety of situations. Scorer, playmaker and he’s been a much better defender this year. We’re going to miss all that.”DOUBLE-DOUBLE HART Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Kuzma said the team’s switching scheme contributed to a strong final stretch on the defensive end.“Just switching everything,” Kuzma said. “Switching pin-downs, pick-and-rolls. And rebounding, too.”The Suns shot 47 percent in the first half. The Lakers held Phoenix to just 29 percent for the remainder of the game.“They got out and they beat us up and down the court,” Suns coach Jay Triano said. “That’s them doing a good job of rebounding and getting it out.”Los Angeles allowed 12 offensive rebounds in the first half, but only four in the second half. Walton said he showed the team a clip at halftime where Warren outworked four Lakers players for an offensive rebound that resulted in a basket.ADVERTISEMENT “You could tell with the way they were talking to each other on the court and the effort they were giving that they were locked in to getting stops for that second half,” Walton said.Brandon Ingram scored 26 points for the Lakers, while Julius Randle added 21 points, eight rebounds and five assists. Kyle Kuzma scored 16 points off the bench.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutTJ Warren scored a team-high 24 points, while Josh Jackson added 16 points and 10 rebounds for the Suns.The Lakers pulled away in the last eight minutes of the fourth quarter with a 15-3 run after leading 97-90. Westbrook, George lead Thunder rout of Durant, Warriors Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH View comments NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencerscenter_img Phoenix Suns forward TJ Warren, right, blocks the shot of Los Angeles Lakers forward Brandon Ingram during the second half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, in Los Angeles. The Lakers won 112-93. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)LOS ANGELES — By the time coach Luke Walton entered the locker room at halftime, his Lakers players were already talking about how to defend better over the next 24 minutes.The talk worked. The Lakers held the Suns to only 36 points in the second half en route to a 112-93 victory on Tuesday night.ADVERTISEMENT Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC MOST READ John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding LATEST STORIES Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises Read Next AFP official booed out of forumlast_img read more

Coach Kerr takes backseat in Warriors rout of Suns

first_imgGlobe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH Draymond Green leads the Golden State Warriors’ huddle during a timeout in their game against the Phoenix Suns. APOAKLAND, Calif. — With the grind of a long NBA season wearing on his team, Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr believed it was time for his players to hear a new voice in the huddle: their own.Kerr turned over most of the coaching duties to his players on Monday night and they responded in fine fashion, playing with more focus than they had in recent weeks in a 129-83 victory over the Phoenix Suns.ADVERTISEMENT John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Payton scored 16 points in the first quarter before Curry got on the scoreboard, but he got little help. Payton made his first seven shots, but his teammates started 1 for 15 and the Warriors managed to take a 25-24 lead by the end of the first after being outscored by 32 points in the first quarter of the previous three games.Curry scored 10 points in the second quarter as Golden State built a 17-point lead at the half and coasted the rest of the way.”We have so many smart basketball minds on our team,” Casspi said. ”The guys really used this opportunity to run things they like.”TIP-INSSuns: G Devin Booker (hip pointer) missed his fourth straight game, and G Tyler Ulis (back) sat for the second straight game. … Phoenix has lost 12 straight in Oakland, last winning here on Feb. 7, 2011.Warriors: G Patrick McCaw, who has been spending time in the G League between NBA games trying to get his confidence back, scored nine points in the second quarter after having just eight in the previous 10 games. He then left the game with a sprained right wrist.QUOTABLE”I was horrible actually. I thought about a play and forgot the second option and had two guys on the wrong place on the board and I actually got a delay of game coming out of halftime because I was scrambling,” Curry said about his role as a coach.FATHER-SONCurry’s 22 points gave him and his father, Dell, a combined 28,883 points in their careers, tying Rick and Brent Barry for the third-most ever by a father-son combination, according to the Elias Sports Bureau. Joe and Kobe Bryant have the most of any duo with 38,895 (33,643 from Kobe). Read Next Mitchell delivers down the stretch, rallies Jazz past Spurs Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH UP NEXTSuns: Visit Utah on Wednesday.Warriors: Visit Portland on Wednesday. Kevin Durant out with Achilles injury; to undergo MRI on Tuesday PLAY LIST 03:12Kevin Durant out with Achilles injury; to undergo MRI on Tuesday02:25Raptors or Warriors? PBA players take their pick of NBA champ01:43Who are Filipinos rooting for in the NBA Finals?01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoisescenter_img 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting ”It’s the players’ team,” Kerr said. ”It’s their team and they have to take ownership of it. As coaches, our job is to nudge them in the right direction, guide them. We don’t control them. They determine their own fate. I don’t think we’ve focused well the last month. It just seemed like the right thing to do.”Kerr said he told the players of his plan after the previous game and they ran the show for most of the day. Andre Iguodala took over at morning shootaround, JaVale McGee ran the computer for the film session and Iguodala, Draymond Green and David West got most of the work designing plays and running the huddle during timeouts.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutKerr and his assistants handled the substitutions before allowing the players to take over from there.”It had to do with me trying to reach my team and I have not reached them the last month,” Kerr said. ”They’re tired of my voice. I’m tired of my voice. I wasn’t reaching them so we figured this was a good night to pull something out of the hat.” LATEST STORIES After the game, Kerr made a point of seeking out Phoenix interim coach Jay Triano to tell him the move wasn’t made out of any disrespect for the Suns, who became the first team to reach 40 losses this season.”You have to do what you have to do to build your own team up,” Triano said. ”If he thinks that helps them, I tip my hat.”Stephen Curry scored 22 points for the Warriors. Omri Casspi added 19 in a rare start in place of the injured Green and Kevin Durant had 17 as Golden State won its 12th straight in the series, its longest active streak against any team.Elfrid Payton scored 29 points in his second game since being acquired at the trade deadline from Orlando, but Phoenix still lost its sixth straight and 11th in the past 12 games.”We have to keep fighting,” Payton said. ”We can’t hang our heads. That’s the great thing about the NBA, there’s another game in two days. So learn from it, get better ready to have a better effort.”ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ View comments AFP official booed out of forum Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencerslast_img read more

SMC-Alab 5 notches 8th win in row

first_imgSlow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises Apart from imports Justin Brownlee and Renaldo Balkman, Alab also got significant contributions from their local crew led by Ray Parks.Brownlee fired 27 points, grabbed 13 rebounds and issued five assists on top of two steals, and four blocks while Balkman tallied 21 points and 14 rebounds.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting San Miguel Corporation-Alab Pilipinas sizzled for its highest scoring output in the Asean Basketball League as it dumped Taiwanese squad Formosa Dreamers, 117-93, Sunday night for its eighth straight victory at Santa Rosa Multipurpose Complex in Santa Rosa, Laguna.The Filipinos came out with all guns blazing in the opening period and refused to let up in the second half as they secured an 11th win in 15 games to close in on one of two outright semifinal slots.ADVERTISEMENT Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH MPBL: Munti faces unbeaten QC at home AFP official booed out of forum Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City View comments NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers MOST READ Read Next Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

Jerie Pingoy shows best form since ankle injury

first_img“I will still do what coach wants me to do. I just hope this game of mine will continue,” he said. Read Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments PBA IMAGESFor Jerie Pingoy, it almost felt like a throwback of sorts.With his team’s fate on his hands once again, the former UAAP Juniors Most Valuable Player did what he does best: deliver the goods.ADVERTISEMENT Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university PLAY LIST 01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City MOST READ LATEST STORIES John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Typhoon ‘Tisoy’ threatens Games PSL: F2 scores second win at expense of woeful Smart Families in US enclave in north Mexico hold sad Thanksgiving Admittedly still groping for form after undergoing surgery back in December, Pingoy’s aim in the PBA D-League may be a little different from the team’s collective goal.“I wanted to prove that I still can contribute even if I came off of an injury. I wanted to show that I still deserve to play,” he said.But Pingoy tries his earnest to not veer away too much from the team’s mission as Akari-Adamson prepares for the upcoming UAAP season later this year.“I just play my role. We don’t have a star player here, so we just try to help each other out,” he said as he seeks to follow the lead of top gun Jerrick Ahanmisi and recently-graduated guard Robbie Manalang.Pingoy, though, remains committed to the system of coach Franz Pumaren.ADVERTISEMENT Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH “I really wanted the game today,” he said.Finally putting his left ankle injury behind, the Cebuano guard drilled three consecutive treys in the final 2:03 which broke the back of Batangas-EAC to deliver the 89-79 victory for Akari-Adamson in the 2018 PBA D-League Aspirants’ Cup on Thursday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutREAD: D-League: Pingoy’s late 3s tow Akari-Adamson past Batangas-EACThat late flurry capped off his 6-of-9 shooting from downtown en route to 23 points, eight assists, four rebounds, and three steals in the win — his best showing in the developmental league to date. LOOK: Iya Villania meets ‘Jumanji: The Next Level’ cast in Mexico Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Google honors food scientist, banana ketchup inventor and war hero Maria Orosa Pussycat Dolls set for reunion tour after 10-year hiatuslast_img read more