Rugby Book Review – Confessions of a Rugby Mercenary

first_imgTAGS: Book Review BUY IT FROM:  www.rbooks.co.uk RRP:  £7.99  Published by:  EburyGot a rugby book or DVD you’d like us to review in the Armchair Zone? Email [email protected] article appeared in the June 2009 issue of Rugby World Magazine LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Bourgoin and Biarritz players show how disciplined they areHIS BOOK was initially rejected by 30 UK publishers, so do we condemn them for failing to spot a masterpiece or praise them for belatedly giving it the platform it deserves? First published in France under the title Top 14, Awa Press in New Zealand then published 2,000 copies in late 2007 and lapped up the acclaim. Now Ebury in London have taken up the baton, bringing John Daniell’s part-humorous, part-shocking insights into French professional rugby to a new audience.Daniell, a Kiwi lock, arrived in France as a 25-year-old in 1997 and was astonished by the violence in the game. In his first outing, a B game in Dijon, he looked on quizzically as his team-mates put on cricket boxes, then reeled as the first lineout saw his nose broken by a punch. There followed a “street fight” in which players and spectators waded in with fists, umbrellas and gumboots – welcome to France!At any given time, 100 or so of France’s 600 professional players are out injured. Not all injuries are sustained on the pitch. One club allegedly turned out the lights in the corridor just as the teams were lining up to go out, so they could launch a surprise attack under cover of darkness. Toulon would kick out on the full so they could come back for the scrum and ‘lay down the law’. Gregor Townsend recalls how he and his fellow Brive centre were trampled on by the forwards as they weren’t “sufficiently enthusiastic” about the game that was to follow.The brutality (and we’ve not even got to eye-gouging) is just one of many topics that Daniell lifts the lid on as he builds the book around Montpellier’s roller-coaster ride through a Top 14 season.RW RATING 5/5 Do you want to buy the issue of Rugby World in which this article appeared? Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit http://mags-uk.com/ipcOr perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here.last_img read more

Eighty minute Miles as RFU Championship reaches climax

first_imgWORCESTER, ENGLAND – MARCH 27: Miles Benjamin of Worcester moves away with the ball during the Guinness Premiership match between Worcester Warriors and Leicester Tigers at Sixways on March 27, 2010 in Worcester, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Miles BenjaminDeadly finisher Miles Benjamin will hope to mark his 100th appearance for Worcester with promotion to the Aviva Premiership.Benjamin’s tries – 25 in 29 appearances this season – have helped Worcester get to within 80 minutes of an immediate return to top-flight rugby.His most recent score came in the fifth minute of the first leg of the RFU Championship play-off final against Cornish Pirates to settle any nerves the Warriors might have had going into last week’s tricky away tie.Worcester went on to win 12-21, with Andy Goode supplying the rest of their points, and the nine-point advantage they take into Wednesday’s return leg sees them installed as favourites to take the title. Warriors are well acquainted with Pirates, having already met the Cornishmen four times this season, and they lead the way in the head to head stats with three wins to the Pirates’ one.However the Pirates’ sole success came on enemy territory at the end of October when Chris Stirling’s men came away from the West Midlands with a 21-23 win. Prolific points machine Rob Cook landed the match-winning penalty four minutes into stoppage time on that occasion to hand the Pirates their first away win in the league for 10 months. Cook fell short of his own high standards when missing two attempts at goal last week, and he will need to be back to his best in the goal kicking stakes if Pirates are to overhaul the deficit from the first leg.RFU Championship finalWorcester Warriors vs. Cornish Pirates, Sixways Stadium, Wednesday May 18, 1945 (live on Sky Sports HD)last_img read more

Italian gets 15 weeks ban for gouging at World Cup

first_imgLeonardo Ghiraldini of Italy has been suspended for 15 weeks after acknowledging that he had been guilty of an act of foul play contrary to Law 10(4)(m).Following a review of broadcast footage, Ghiraldini was cited by Independent Citing Commissioner Peter Larter (ENG) under Law 10.4(m) acts contrary to good sportsmanship; in this case, for contact with the eye or the eye area of an Irish player in the Rugby World Cup 2011 Pool C match against Ireland in Dunedin on 2 October. Ghiraldini admitted a breach of Law 10.4(m), but denied his actions were deliberate.Ghiraldini was suspended by Independent Judicial Officer Bruce Squire QC (NZL) in accordance with the Rugby World Cup 2011 Disciplinary process.Having conducted a detailed review of all the evidence available, including all broadcast angles and additional evidence from the Player and submissions from his legal representative, the Judicial Officer found the contact with the eyes of the Irish player to be a deliberate act on the part of Ghiraldini and categorised it as top end offending which has an entry point of 24 weeks suspension. Ghiraldini was accordingly suspended from all Rugby up to and including 17 January 2012. He is free to resume playing on 18 January 2012.The player has 48 hours in which to appeal from the time he was informed of the decision. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img The Judicial Officer also took the view there should be an increase on the suspension period prescribed by the entry point for deterrent purposes, noting that increased penalties had not been reflected in any significant reduction in offending of this kind. However, taking into account particular aspects of the offending in this case and a range of mitigating factors, principally Ghiraldini’s previously unblemished record, the Judicial Officer reduced the period of suspension otherwise arrived at to 15 weeks.last_img read more

George Smith on the Wallabies back row

first_img TAGS: HighlightWasps RW caught up with Wallaby legend George Smith for his views on the Pool of Death and how the Australian backrow was shaping up LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS He’s the second-most capped Wallaby forward of all-time and was the youngest player to reach 100 caps ever at just 29, so when new Wasps signing George Smith says he’s confident Michael Cheika’s men will emerge from Pool A’s group of death, it probably worth listening to his thoughts on the approaching World Cup.Speaking to Smith, 35 – who revealed he was phoned by Cheika earlier in the year to check his availability for the World Cup – at the Wasps training ground at their kit-launch, the quietly-spoken New South Wales native says the Pool will be decided in the backrow, and with Cheika this morning naming his 31-man squad, the former Brumbie runs the rule over the men at the back of the scrum and the threat they will pose to England and Wales…Hooper-Pocock combinationMachine: The return to fitness of David Pocock has given Australia the option to play him with Michael HooperThe 111-cap openside was very interested in the much-discussed Michael Hooper-David Pocock combination in the backrow against New Zealand, where Australia beat the All Blacks for the first time in four years, 27-19. “You immediately saw the positives of the Hooper-Pocock combination. They dovetailed well together; they didn’t compete for the same breakdown and were aware of the roles they were playing on the field. In doing so, they nullified Richie McCaw which is no mean feat. In Test rugby you’re expected to understand all roles, not just as a fetcher but the 6 and 8 role and they have the intelligence to understand taht. I don’t see their height affecting them at the tail because lineouts are so high tempo now and they’ve jumped at the back in Super Rugby. Nothing Cheiks saw will have dissuaded him from playing a Fardy-Hooper-Pocock backrow.”Mixing it upDirty work: Scott Fardy has made the hard yards in the Wallaby backrowSmith says from studying recent performances, the onus has been on trying out lots of different combinations during the Rugby Championship with the only constant, blindside Scott Fardy. “Fardy should be in because he’s playing extremely well as a workhorse. Saying that, I can see the qualities Wycliff Palu could bring. He’s very strong and can intimidate opposition defences and break first-up tackles. They brought in Wycliff for the final Test against New Zealand for the final Test and he did welli. Cheiks has a good idea of what he’s going to do for each Test.”Men in reserveWith Ben McCalman and Sean McMahon adding to the Wallabies complement, Smith says there’s one man who’s been unlucky not to make the cut. “Scott Higginbotham has been superb in Super Rugby for the Rebels, he’s extremely talented and has excellent ball-skills for a tall player, plus he can play 6 and 8. Saying that McCalman has played well for the Force and excelled in the Sydney game and McMahon is an emerging talent.”Cruel cut: Scott Higginbotham is unlucky to miss out on the 31-man squadEngland and Wales threatSmith says he little first-hand experience of the England backrow but one name that stands out is James Haskell, his soon-to-be new club colleague. “I’ve played against Hask and know him personally, he’s a very good player. I’m looking forward to hooking up with him. I know a little more about the Wales backrow than England, from the Lions in 2013. I’ve played against Taulupe Faletau and Dan Lydiate. Faletau is an extremely good ball-carrier, a skilled player with a good handling game, while Sam Warburton is an extremely good leader. He’s very calm and brings a confidence to the team.”center_img New clubmate: Smith is aware of James Haskell’s strengthsWho will emerge from Pool A?Smith says it’s very difficult to look past the Wallabies as the winners of the Pool. “I’m very biased to the Wallabies. They have performed well in the TRC and if they’re not hit by injuries, I see them hitting their peak. All three back-rows are very competitive and I firmly believe the backrow will be the deciding factor in the matches and for me, the Hooper-Pocock combination can change the momentum of the game.”So who will join them? “Well who can count out Fiji? They can always cause problems and beat Wales in 2007. I’ve played against them and with them in the Top 14 and they’re dangerous,” Smith says with the hint of a smile.Danger man: Nemani Nadolo is one of Fiji’s very talented playersThe new challenge with WaspsAfter spending a year with Lyon in the Top 14 Smith says he didn’t know too much about Wasps but a friendship with Dai Young through the Barbarians forced him to consider moving to the UK. “Before coming here, I didn’t have too much detail on the players. I’d seen them from afar in the Premiership. I was very impressed with Nathan Hughes and Ashley Johnson and was aware of Hask. Since arriving I’ve been very impressed with the attitude of the squad, especially the backrow. That was reassuring to me. They’re all willing to learn new things.”Mentor roleWith young backrows Thomas Young and Sam Jones eager to learn from the Wallaby, Smith takes his mentoring role seriously. “I think people learn a lot more from what you do than what you say If you keep repeating yourself, they’ll zone out. I like having a quiet word here and there is more powerful than blasting out instructions. Earlier in my career, I’d shoot from the hip and say what was on my mind but as you start to learn more about the game you mature. I’m looking forward to a new start. I haven’t had a proper pre-season for a few years and with the Premiership pushed-back, I can hit the ground running.”Wallaby 31-man squad: Stephen Moore (c), Tatafu Polota-Nau. Props: Greg Holmes, Sekope Kepu, Scott Sio, James Slipper, Toby Smith (uncapped). Locks: Kane Douglas Dean Mumm, Rob Simmons, Will Skelton. Backrow: Scott Fardy, Michael Hooper – (joint-VC) Ben McCalman, Sean McMahon, Wycliff Palu, David Pocock. Half-backs: Will Genia, Nick Phipps, Quade Cooper, Bernard Foley. Centres: Kurtley Beale, Matt Giteau, Matt Toomua. Back-three: Adam Ashley-Cooper – (joint-VC) Israel Folau, Rob Horne, Drew Mitchell,  Henry Speight, Joe Tomane,  Tevita Kuridrani George Smith was speaking at the launch of Wasps’ new Under Armour kit for the 2015/16 season www.waspsshop.co.uklast_img read more

Nutrition: How to consume caffeine

first_img1 cup of rolled oats, 1 cup of fresh brewed coffee, Handful of mixed berries, 2 tablespoons of chopped nuts, 4 tablespoons of peanut butter, Handful of raisins, 1 scoop of flavoured protein powderStep-by-step:1 Put the rolled oats in a bowl and pour over your coffee.2 Add the berries, nuts, peanut butter, raisins and protein powder to the bowl.3 Mix well and pour into a large dish.4 Stir in the garlic, cumin, coriander, chilli powder and tomatoes and cook for 15 seconds before adding the vegetables back in and cooking for a further minute.5 Place in the fridge for at least two hours to set. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Having once been a banned substance – before being allowed again in 2004 – there is still a prevailing perception that it can only hinder your athletic output.But according to rugby nutritionist James Morehen, consuming 3-6mg of caffeine in liquid form per kg of your body weight prior to exercise will help improve performance for team sports athletes over the age of 18.For you science fans out there, ingesting caffeine will also aid the mobilisation of fat from your adipose tissue and muscle cells, and stimulate the release of adrenaline – which, when it hits your central nervous system, will make you more alert and reduce the perceived feeling of pain or prolonged fatigue.Caffeine hit: Coffee can boost performanceWith this in mind, a cup of coffee in the morning and/or before training will give you a boost. Not only that but Morehen and fellow team members at Liverpool John Moores University say that caffeine ingestion before an afternoon nap is recommended. The rough time period for caffeine to take effect is 20 to 60 minutes, so ingestion before the nap will allow the ergogenic aid to do its stuff and ease you softly out of your nap before you wake.Depending on the brand, 60g of dark chocolate will contain 10-50mg of caffeine but be careful – a 250ml can of Red Bull contains 80mg of caffeine. High intake isn’t advised for those under the age of 18. For adult athletes seeking an energy boost during the day, the recipe below is an ideal snack.DO – Swill your coffee – your salivary glands will tell your brain to release adrenalineDON’T – Consume caffeine in the hours leading up to bedtimeCoffee & protein oat barsCoffee & protein oat bars (10 servings)What you’ll need: Believe it or not, there’s a negative stigma attached to caffeine in sport 6 Cut into cubes and enjoy!For the latest Rugby World subscription offers click here and find out how to download the digital edition here.last_img read more

Hotshot: Harlequins Women wing Heather Cowell

first_img Harlequins Women wing Heather Cowell Date of birth (23 Jan 1996) Born Twickenham Club Harlequins Country England Position WingWhat sports did you play growing up? I played all sports at school and mini rugby at London Scottish with my brothers for a while. I also did gymnastics, which got serious pretty quickly and they weren’t keen on me playing rugby as well.I started gymnastics at seven, did my first international competition at nine and my first World Championships at 11. I was a junior world champion in tumbling and competed at international level until my second year of uni at 20, but then I wanted a new challenge.That’s where rugby came in? Yes. One of my friends played and suggested I came down, so I started playing for the uni (University of Birmingham). Then in my third year I did half a season at Worcester.Did you enjoy rugby straightaway? Definitely. I loved being outside and kicking a ball around. I’d always done that with my brothers anyway.Who was your childhood hero? Kelly Holmes was always someone I looked up to. I enjoyed watching her at the Olympics.When did you link up with Harlequins? Corner stop: Heather Cowell scores for Harlequins in the Tyrrells Premier 15s (Getty Images) After uni I came home and played for Quins for six months, then I went travelling. I wasn’t really serious about rugby then. I’d had enough of being serious about sport with the gymnastics.Then when I got back for the start of last season, I linked up with Quins again and played a full season.What are your goals this year? To build on last season and keep developing. At Quins we have an amazing set-up with an unbelievable amount of international players, so I want to keep learning from them and keep playing well. And hopefully get some tries!What about international honours? At the end of last season, I was in and out of England camps but I didn’t get selected for the tour (Super Series). It was still really cool and there was lots to learn in an environment with that professionalism. My long-term goal is to get a cap.How difficult is it to juggle rugby with work? That’s the hardest thing. It’s not just training, it’s getting enough sleep, eating right and so on, as well as working 9am to 5.30pm and studying for my chartered accountancy exams. It gets a bit crazy.RW VERDICT: Cowell has achieved success in gymnastics and is now doing the same in rugby. The wing has reduced her working week to four days to give her more time for rugby as she bids to become a key figure for Quins and earn England honours. A former gymnast who is now impressing in the wide channels for Harlequinscenter_img This article originally appeared in the November 2019 issue of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

The long road to recovery: Henry Trinder on coming back from long-term injury

first_img“I’d been so relaxed I probably missed my tablets as well, with the planning for the house party. But in terms of my last ten years, it’s been controlled and I hadn’t had one since I was 18 or 19. It has never impacted my rugby.”Trinder admits that it is probably weird that the seizures don’t scare him, as he blacks out and doesn’t remember them. He is well aware of the potential dangers, though. And he insists that it has never held him back. He would not be surprised if there are other sports people with the condition who are not as open, but he acknowledges how lucky he is to be so mildly affected.It has been the sessions away from the team, working to get back to full training with the squad post-injury, that have held his attentions these past months.There have been moments where it has been testing. When your average person hears the word ‘massage’, it’s unlikely they feel the same pang of apprehension. When we visit Gloucester’s training base in pre-season, we witness the medical staff going through it with Trinder. Soft-tissue work; mobilisation around the Achilles; loosening him up after gym work; working on the attachment between the knee and the bottom of his foot; breaking down scar tissue. So much is wince-inducing but necessary.Trinder tells another story of when he first did his ACL and LCL. During the healing process, he had to keep his leg straight for eight weeks, so everything was set “like concrete”. When he finally got on the physio bed to mix things up, they effectively bent the leg and tried to force his heel to his bum. “That was by far the worst thing I have ever experienced in my life,” he says.But Trinder throws himself at it all.High knees: Training one-on-one with Pamment at Gloucester (Daniel Gould)He is diligent with his work at every point. Over the months of discussion, Trinder talks us through the different stages of recovery and rehabilitation.With long-term injuries, in the early, post-op days you have to make peace with the fact you can’t get moving right away. Trinder says these days of getting the foot up and not sweating were vital for his Achilles injury, such is the risk of infection after an operation like his. It’s boring but you follow surgeon advice.By his own admission, he is the type to research his injury, looking for articles and blog posts and the odd video about coming back from his injury. Going further, he adds: “I can get very carried away and I can get told off for seeing something on YouTube or Instagram and thinking, ‘Well, I’ll give that a try for a week and I’ll add that one to my rehab’.”Clearly athletes can overdo it if they try too much too soon and have no dialogue with the experts around them. But Trinder feels he can read how his body reacts to certain exercises, where one last light set can fit in. He makes it clear he doesn’t mean stacking loads of weight plates on a bar and squatting heavy or doing calf raises well ahead of time. But he is willing to do more if he can. “It’s a mentality of whatever it takes to get me back to doing what we love.”When we see the Gloucester set-up, Trinder works on running mechanics away from the main group. He moves on to jogging and low-intensity running, a “refreshing” change. At the very start of rehab there is some pain, but by the running stage he is healed and simply building back up. In the mornings Trinder wakes up, expecting soreness, but finds exercising pain-free is exhilarating.According to head of rehab Pamment, Mondays and Thursdays are higher-stress days for the injured. Depending on specific injuries, those days have a lot of what he calls “nervous system fatigue” while Tuesdays and Fridays are more focused on “tissue fatigue or metabolic fatigue”. Wednesday is an admin day.By mid-November, team training is back on the menu for a happy Trinder.SUPPORT NETWORKThe Gloucester veteran is chuffed that medical science has come as far as it has. And he is appreciative of finding some support in other places too. “If I’d done my Achilles five years ago, I would probably have to call it a day. And I’ve talked to guys in the league like Kyle Eastmond and Anthony Watson who have done their Achilles in the last year or two. They are back fully flying and say they feel as good as ever.”Breaking out: Another run from Trinder against Leicester, 2016 (Getty Images)In what you now know is a classic Trinderism, he didn’t hang about before contacting these guys either. Asked when he first picked up the phone to message either, the centres replies: “Oh, about an hour after I did it!”That rugby fraternity can be a vital asset. He and ‘Chibba’ Hanson have helped each other through the pain of coming back – and will continue to do so – and they have spent a large amount of time having debriefs over coffee.Related: The life of a journeyman playerWhile the team of Glaws conditioners and coaches have activities and group work set out through pre-season and into the main competition phases, it is inevitable that injured players form another group within a group. Trinder, who has represented England against the Barbarians and has Saxons honours, describes this little unit, who may have similar schedules or have downtime together, as a “band of brothers”. You will them on in their own fights back.But Trinder is also keen to skip to the end of the book, to see what lies ahead.“It’s definitely a challenge,” Pamment says of working with returning players, rather than conditioning the fully fit. “It constantly makes you ask questions, questioning things you are doing. Not every programme fits every person.“With Henry it is interesting because he has had so many injuries in the past. You definitely have the athlete at the centre of what you do and he has been through all the processes.“It needs to be a two-way relationship, especially with any long-term injuries. He’s got so much experience, you’ve got to take on board what he says and him questioning you is a good thing.“Of course, I don’t tell him how to play rugby! If I feel ‘this’ is the right way to do something, I’ll provide the evidence. If it doesn’t work, we try something else. There’s more than one way to do things.”Bring a camera to training, though, and inevitably the assumption is it’s to do with what is dubbed the ‘Trindermonial’. With a ladies’ day and a match in his honour, you can sense the support for him. Wife Ryann has been a rock too.THE FUTUREThere is something cathartic about talking through long-term injuries, finds Trinder. He explains: “Jonas Dodoo, the sprint coach who works with England, is a friend of mine from years ago, when I was at Hartpury. When I got injured I rang him and he said, ‘Keep a diary.’ I think this is the same as that.“When you’ve had a bad couple of days or when you are able to look back and really recall those memories of when you were struggling or thought it was never going to get better, it actually then puts you into a good mindset.Treatment table: Trinder relaxes at Gloucester’s training ground (Daniel Gould)“It’s like, ‘actually that really is working’ or ‘look how far I’ve come’. Either having a conversation about it or writing it down shows you that, even though there are dark days or you wonder if it’s worth it, you can see how much hard work you are putting in. It does flip a switch to say, ‘Just keep pushing on’.”The idea of giving back to his club is something Trinder thinks about. He recognises the support he has received over the years and realises that, despite your standing in your team, time keeps pushing on. That inherent, burning ambition means that he does not want to be left behind by his peers either.“The closer I’m getting now the more excited I’m getting about wanting to play and wanting to contribute,” Trinder says.“Now I’ve seen improvement and I’m getting to a point where I am more mobile, I’m running routes. You take that stuff for granted when you play rugby.“Waking up and being pain-free or waking up and not being on crutches, being able to see progress which has taken six months of work – I can look back and see the foundations for what’s hopefully a return into the Gloucester team. I’m definitely in a spot now where I am very excited to get back out there.”Looking ahead: Trinder poses for Rugby World (Daniel Gould)Speed off the mark and the ability to beat defenders has always been a signature of Trinder’s game. Having spoken to medical experts and others who have had Achilles injuries, he is well aware that springiness is generally the last attribute to return. So he has been working on his understanding of the game, preparing to see things earlier, arrive at events and dig in or spot opportunities and distribute really well until he is back at his fast-twitch best.He feels he can learn off Danny Cipriani about how to manipulate defenders and he has a renewed appreciation for keen analysis. More than anything though, he wants to contribute to Gloucester’s quick, running-based game plan.Having sought out anecdotes from fellow pros, Trinder is happy to talk with others who reach out – though he does caution that the views of medics and conditioning experts is better for them.As for Hanson, Trinder says he will be “very, very proud of him when he is playing as well”.As. Well. You can sense the raw excitement about competing again.This feature first appeared in Rugby World magazine in December. We can often forget about athletes out with long-term injuries. So over a period of months, Henry Trinder has guided us through what it’s really like to work your way back onto the pitch. This feature first appeared in Rugby World magazine in December. TAGS: Investigation Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.center_img The centre knew instantly when it happened in March. It was as typical as any training session can be – there are ups and downs through every season and some days you start fresher than others, but coming off a game for Gloucester, Henry Trinder felt alright.Then it blew up. He ruptured his Achilles after jumping to catch a pass.“As I landed and tried to push off, it just popped at the back of my leg,” Trinder tells us. “I knew what it was. And I hit the ground, grabbed my Achilles… or where it should be. It wasn’t and that’s when I thought, ‘Wow, that’s pretty much gone.’ So I then gave it my best attempt to try and hold it all in place, which obviously wasn’t doing anything and I got carried off the field and into the physio room.” So began an odyssey…Trinder is no stranger to injuries. He has had plenty of niggles, the odd tweak and damage needing a few months to heal – he fractured a shoulder and a jaw in a rough season, he gives as one example. But he then had what he calls his first “big, big injury” back in 2015.The one-club man describes it as “folding my knee in half” on his return from five months out – in a season opener he damaged his anterior cruciate ligament, lateral collateral ligament and hamstring.His comeback from that injury, in 2016? He says he felt fine playing for half a season, but as the campaign end approached, he got caught in a ruck and damaged the same knee. More surgery followed, bringing another eight months of recovery and rehabilitation.Diving over: Trinder scoring against Tigers in 2018 (Getty Images)This is a part of rugby that rarely gets covered in any detail. Out of sight, out of mind, we hardly hear of what is happening behind the scenes with the badly wounded athletes. We only get snippets during the glorious comebacks, complications or retirements.So with Trinder now targeting a return to Gloucester action again, in his testimonial year no less, who better to guide us through what really happens when someone suffers long-term injury. Over several months, he has talked us through the mental strain, the hours of work, the power of relationships and the drive to improve within allocated rehabilitation. In the course of discussing this, he opens up for the first time about dealing with epilepsy. He considers the power of new thinking and whether or not he can be guilty of overworking. This is life on the long road to recovery…THE SHOCK OF IT ALLThe apocryphal tale is that some heard it pop. Regardless, pals hustled to help.“In terms of the journey from there, I was scanned within an hour and a half of it happening,” Trinder explains of his Achilles injury. “By 7:30pm I knew what I’d done. Some of the hardest moments come when you hang around waiting for scans. You know you’ve hurt yourself, you know something is wrong and then you have to wait two days for a scan and another day for the results.“That’s when everything goes round your head. Fortunately – or unfortunately – I knew what I had done. I didn’t know the full extent and eventually learnt that it was a full rupture, but at least that night we had an answer. As soon as you know, you start wrapping your head around it.”Related: The latest investigations from Rugby WorldIf there were loyalty cards for surgery, the centre’s would have a few holes in it. Trinder has briefly pondered if people can be born with bad luck, if you can pick it up. He has nagged himself wondering if he did too little physical preparation for the game or if he did too much.While there was damage done through collision and uncontrollable situations on the pitch, he has also looked at the anomalous bits, the freak injuries, and wondered if he was predetermined to pick up pains. For example, when he first started out in rugby, he had a dead leg that began to calcify. After a few months rehabbing, he came back… only to pick up the same thing in the other leg five games later. “Which again is ridiculous, the odds of that!” he laughs.Bed time: Getting worked on post-gym session (Daniel Gould)But you can, he believes, go down the rabbit hole with worrying about any curse. If you genuinely thought you were preordained to get hurt again, you would never bother coming back. And he reckons if you go into action fretting about what might damage you, you become more likely to injure yourself.Instead, Trinder likes focusing on the details. He likes studying up, he likes knowing what the plan is and if he’s comfortable with a certain physio’s style of strapping he will stick with that. He will ask questions. He wants facts.He can be philosophical about his time out too. When discussing his misfortune with the second ACL injury in 2016, he adds: “The silver lining of long-term injury is that you can try to get everything else (in your body) as fit as possible.”Instead of building up to “slogging out long runs” and then going for speed work, Gloucester took time to look at his running mechanics, getting the sprint technique down first and applying it to his longer runs. What they were doing was building for long-term health.This sets Trinder off on a tangent. “With a long-term injury, it’s not when you’re fit and cleared to play that you should get thrown in. I see a lot of players, high-profile players who I won’t name, who are fit one week, get thrown in to play 80 minutes and then they get another long-term injury. To me, that’s ridiculous. What I’ve really benefited from is that because guys have played well and I’ve had an extended period of training to be fit, I think that is what makes the body a bit more robust.”Many of us can justify in our heads why a star would want to rush back. We are the ones sitting at home forgetting about them, while they are the competitive beasts straining to play the game again.But the time on the sidelines is one of conflicting emotions. Going through a few stages, Trinder explains the complex psychological steps a returning athlete can experience, starting with the surgery.“The more serious the operation, the more worried you are about it. In a way you will never be the same again.“If you can wrap your head around that and wrap your head around possibly doing it all over again, what’s probably made me strongest is that as much as I’ve got injured, quite badly, I’ve always gone out there and left it all behind for 80 minutes. It’s almost madness, going out there and doing it all again, but it’s quite hard to explain!”Dealing with the emotional swings of a long-term injury can’t be underestimated as you power through rehab either. In a twist of fate, hooker James Hanson has been out with a near identical Achilles injury. While most of their time is spent in one-on-one sessions or with physios, these two-thirds of the Achilles Crew – a WhatsApp group including head of rehabilitation Jon Pamment – have had some interesting sessions with psychologist Dave Collins, who worked with the Gloucester squad last season.Stretched: Doing drills with John Pamment (Daniel Gould)“He sat down with me and James and had a good chat about structuring and seeing the next step and visualising,” Trinder explains. “He was very big on visualising. That was quite an interesting thought, to visualise yourself doing exercises two weeks in advance. So when I’m sat on the sofa I’m visualising myself weight bearing. And then I’m visualising walking out of the boot. And then out of the boot I will visualise myself loading it with weight. So when you’re there, you’re actually ready for it. It’s a very powerful thing and a lot of athletes use visualisation, as a tool to succeed and to empower them.Chatting to RW (Daniel Gould)“The strangest one he said was about trying to be inside your tendon or your injury and actually visualise it healing and aligning. He used an analogy of a girl and you’re combing her knotted hair. So the more you comb it the better it is, the more straight it goes. And that’s how you want the (tendon) fibres organised.“Those sorts of things, I hadn’t really used that before with previous injuries and I thought that it was, if anything, quite a good distraction or a way to shortcut 15 minutes a day. But it was quite an interesting angle that he went on that I thought was quite good.”At the moment the focus is just on taking more steps forward. Returning players must be aware that things might not go totally to plan, that a niggle or knock could be around the corner. Trinder accepts this but won’t dwell on it – he’d like to play some rugby first. While a dead leg or a dislocated pinky would frustrate, anything but another major blow is manageable.Candidly, Trinder adds: “If it was a serious one, again, if my Achilles was to go again, that would probably be the worst thing I can think of. But you just get over that when you get to it. It’s good to already think of (dealing with minor setbacks). But at the same time I’m very cautious not to think too negatively.”Related: Life after rugby, a special reportFrustrations are not like a game of Buckaroo, and even if they were, the Gloucester stalwart says, the worst has already happened. The mule has kicked, he’s had the horror injuries and come through. He has the best advice, expert help, good people around him. For him, “as long as it’s not a ton of bricks” he is happy to reset the game and have a mini fresh start after the little niggles.As you soon discover too, Trinder will put in a shift with his physical work, doing anything he can to get back. But before we get to that you first learn something else about the 30-year-old.LOOKING AFTER YOUR HEALTH“I actually had a seizure in January this year and that was the first one I’ve had in ten years,” Trinder says of his life with epilepsy. It’s not a subject that is discussed publicly, partly because the centre has always had a handle on things. But on a few isolated occasions he has been caught off guard with it.The topic comes up as he discusses the problems with him and Hanson carpooling to get to training at a time when neither could use one leg – the hooker had done his right one, meaning he couldn’t drive an automatic, while Trinder had done his left leg. But it turns out Trinder cannot get behind the steering wheel anyway, not being clear to drive within 12 months of a seizure.How long has he dealt with epilepsy?“I had my second seizure when I was 18. I was on my first pre-season with Gloucester, in Canada. It was the last day, we’d had a bit of a social the night before. We’d worked very, very hard the whole time and then I was ill as well. I’ve got a few triggers. Basically being ill, not sleeping and then (adding) alcohol tends to be the mixture – which are all great!Big rivals: Evading Bath back in 2018 (Getty Images)“My first one was when I was at home but again it was the exact same circumstances. I was ill all week, still training and we were flogged a bit. Then I went out and had a couple, then a couple more, then a couple more drinks.“I’ve only had four seizures – touch wood. It can lay dormant and come out, but in the last ten years in terms of my rugby career I’ve been really good.”So what was the trigger for the one in January? “It was my wife (Ryann’s) birthday, I’d been ill all week. We were up late on the Saturday, got up in the morning and that’s when it happened. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Anglican church’s Christmas billboard vandalized in New Zealand

first_img By David CramptonPosted Dec 21, 2011 Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Philip Rose says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Anglican Communion Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs center_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service December 21, 2011 at 8:55 pm Skinner says he would destroy any replacement, the article does not mention if he has been charged with a crime for the first act of vandalism. I would certainly hope so. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican church’s Christmas billboard vandalized in New Zealand Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Comments (1) Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME [Ecumenical News International, Wellington, New Zealand] An Anglican church’s Christmas billboard, depicting Jesus’ mother Mary dressed in traditional garb and holding a pregnancy test strip while covering her mouth with the other hand, was vandalized over the weekend.The billboard, erected on Dec. 15 by St. Matthews-in-the-City in central Auckland, New Zealand’s biggest city, has been greeted with controversy.Arthur Skinner of the Catholic Action Group, a conservative lay association, claims he removed the image of the pregnancy strip, according to a story in the New Zealand Herald.“This is Satanic, this is the ultimate Satanic attack, when Lucifer attacks his worst enemy, the Blessed Virgin,” Skinner is quoted as saying in the paper.Clay Nelson, the vicar at St. Matthews, says the billboard sought to avoid a sentimental take on Christmas. He expected it to spark thought and conversation about the Christmas story.“Christmas is real. It’s about a real pregnancy, a real mother and a real child. It’s about real anxiety, courage, and hope.”St. Matthews has controversial history. In 2009, its Christmas billboard showed Mary and Joseph in bed, with a tag line, “Poor Joseph, God was a hard act to follow.” That billboard was also vandalized, and its replacement defaced with a knife. Auckland bishop John Paterson called the billboard “insensitive and disrespectful,” and was disappointed when the church decided to replace it.Mainstream Catholics say the provocative billboard fails to provide constructive debate, as it ignores the real account of the Gospel. “Mary is not a shocked solo mother, but a young woman who has given her assent and trust to God,” said Auckland Catholic Communications director Lyndsay Freer.Jim White, Auckland’s assistant Anglican bishop disagrees. “It gets people talking; it’s provocative but thought-provoking,” he said. “It is certainly a fine line; lots of people think it has stepped over that line. I don’t. They are trying to make Christmas relevant.”Nelson says the billboard is intended to hold different strands of a real Christmas together: anxiety and joy, suffering and compassion, Santa and Jesus.“In this season we encourage one another to be generous to those who suffer, to give to strangers, and to care for all, especially those who have the least. Like the first Santa, St. Nicholas did.”Nelson says he is undecided about whether to replace the billboard. Skinner said he would destroy any replacement. Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

RIP: The Rt. Rev. John C. T. Chien 簡啟聰主教

first_img Obituary, [Episcopal Diocese of Taiwan] The Rt. Rev. John C. T. Chien, the first native bishop of Taiwan, died on March 5 following a short illness. He was 72.Chien was ordained and consecrated as bishop on March 25, 1988, marking a new era in the indigenization of the Taiwan Episcopal Church.Born into a modest farming family in Gou-Bei Village, Dalin, Chia-Yi, southern Taiwan on March 23, 1940, Chien’s first direct contact with the Christian Gospel came as an undergraduate economics student at Tunghai University, Taichung, where he attended English Bible studies led by the Rev. William A. Buell.Chien was baptized at St. James’ Episcopal Church, Taichung, on Dec. 25, 1962 and confirmed on Jan. 20, 1963; followed a few years later (after military service) by the decision to respond to God’s calling and train at Tainan Theological Seminary. Such a major break with tradition initially disturbed his parents, because as the eldest of six children he was expected to become the main breadwinner of the family. His parents later came to support his decision, and during the following years virtually all of Chien’s family became Christians, even establishing a mission station in their Gou-Bei home with regular weekly services.On March 29, 1967, Chien and his wife Grace H. N. Chiu were married and thus began a lifetime of service together, Grace fully supporting and encouraging her husband in ministry.Grace, a music graduate and piano teacher, came from a devout Christian family and her father was a Presbyterian minister. On May 21, 1967, Chien was ordained deacon, followed by ordination as priest on Nov. 30, 1967.Chien first served at St. Andrew’s Church, Cha-ting (1967-69), then Grace Church, Tainan (1969-73). Overseas study at Virginia Theological Seminary led to Chien being awarded a Master of Sacred Theology degree in 1974 (and later an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree in 1998).Upon his return from the U.S., he served as rector of Good Shepherd Church, Taipei (1975-85) followed by a year (1985-6) at Selly Oak College in Birmingham, U.K., then returning to Taiwan as dean of St. John’s Cathedral, Taipei (1986-87).Of the five previous bishops of Taiwan, the first two were American, and the following three from Hong Kong. All had worked hard to establish a strong foundation for the diocese, preparing it well to be handed onto local leadership. Also in the same year, 1988, the Diocese of Taiwan was upgraded from missionary diocese to full diocesan status. Yet the 1980s were also a time of rapid economic development and great political upheaval, with the ending of martial law in 1987 and the transition towards democracy.Chien, sharing the background and values of the local people, is credited with being able to work across ethnic and political divisions, and help the church to focus more on its ministry of proclaiming the Gospel.Under his leadership, Diocesan Constitutions and Canons were revised, committees were reorganized, debate was encouraged, and all were respected regardless of their opinion.With Chien’s background in economics, diocesan finances became more organized and transparent, the diocesan kindergarten ministry was strengthened, and his concern for evangelism and outreach developed.Chien also encouraged a new generation of students at the Episcopal institution, then known as St. John’s and St. Mary’s Institute of Technology (SJSMIT) in Taipei.Chien supported a new program giving these students the chance to first serve in the church over a period of time, testing their call. Previously, clergy (including Chien himself) had been sent to Presbyterian seminaries, but the seminaries insisted on a five-year training program for college graduates such as those from SJSMIT, which was considered unnecessarily lengthy.A major breakthrough came when he negotiated an agreement with Fu-Jen Catholic University in Taipei to allow future clergy to train on their three-year seminary program.The need for Anglican theological training for laity and clergy led to the continued development of the Trinity Hall Training Program, originally started in 1984.In 1997, Chien ordained the Rev. Elizabeth F. J. Wei, Taiwan’s first female priest. He also initiated an Ancestor Memorial Liturgy, and the translation and publication in Mandarin Chinese of an important series of books on Anglicanism.Chien also faithfully served on the Board of Trustees of both Tunghai University and SJSMIT for many years.He helped establish and also served as president of the National Council of Churches of Taiwan (NCCT), promoting ecumenical projects and cooperation in Taiwan and overseas. He was treasurer of the Council of Churches of East Asia (CCEA), promoted dialogue and exchange with the Anglican Church in Japan, Philippines, Hong Kong, Canada and the U.S., and twice attended the Lambeth Conference, 1988 and 1998.Chien retired on June 30, 2001 and returned with Grace to his home village of Gou-Bei where he continued to serve, preaching, celebrating and encouraging clergy and church members throughout the diocese.He is survived by Grace, three children and five grandchildren. Comments (6) TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab RIP: The Rt. Rev. John C. T. Chien 簡啟聰主教 First native bishop of Taiwan marked new era of indigenization Press Release Service Posted Apr 4, 2013 Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Comments are closed. April 4, 2013 at 4:25 pm It was an honor to meet Bp. & Mrs. Chien when I visited the diocese while on Executive Council. Bp. Chien was very helpful and hospitable while Mrs. Chien was most gracious. Even though her Engglish was very limited, we communicated with lots of smiles.My husband and I shall always remember that on the day of our departure, Bp. and Mrs. Chien, being caring to the end, showed up (They had left much earlier.) as we boarded our bus for the airport, making sure that we were on the correct bus. This gesture was typical of two wonderful human beings. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI April 4, 2013 at 4:36 pm Bp John Chien was a steadfast Christian and Episcopalian. He was our rector at Good Shepherd Church when our family lived in Taipei in the 1980s, and we attended his doctorate award at Canterbury Cathedral when we lived in England in the 1990s. He had many good friends and colleagues, and was noteworthy in developing liturgy to harmonize traditional Chinese ancestral respect with the Episcopal tradition. We send our love and condolences to Grace, Bishop John’s lifelong partner in ministry. April 4, 2013 at 10:53 pm I well remember Bishop Chien with great affection, and my ercollection that I had med him briefly aat Virginia Seminary was reinforced.I miss all of my Friends in Taiwan, thinking of you and speaking often of you.I have been praying for Bishoo Chien since I first heard of his death.in Christ,Fr. Peter+ April 4, 2013 at 4:54 pm John Chien was a Bishop’s Classmate of mine and became a friend. John’s wife, Grace, became a wonderful friend of my wife, Mari.We pray for our Brother, John, who has entered into Larger Life with God and for strength and comfort for Grace during these days of mourning. douglas phillips says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Edmund Der, Canon, St. James’ Cath. Toronto says: April 5, 2013 at 12:55 am Bishop John Chien wrote the most substantial and stimulating preface for my book” Meditation by Balsom Lake” in 1994 which I was ever grateful. Later we became in-laws and better friends than ever.He was an avid reader and a disciplined sportsman in his retirement. A True gentleman and a great host to us and to many visitors, Bishop Chien is also a very loving father and grandfather. He is a very dedicated servant of the Lord. I talked to him in the phone two weeks before he was called to be among the saints, he was well prepared to meet Our Lord.He will long be missed and we treasured the friendship we shared. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Rev. Dr. Fran Toy says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Father Peter D”Alesandre says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem center_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA Sanford Z. K. Hampton says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tony and Beth Price says: Rector Martinsville, VA Asia, Featured Events People Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET August 2, 2013 at 4:02 pm I am deeply saddened to learn of John’s passing. I worked for him at Good Shepherd from 1975 -1977 and he was the most naturally and genuinely kind-hearted man I have ever known. He was exceptionally open-minded and inquisitive, especially for a priest, and even taught me what he knew about wai dan gung when he hosted my family on our three week return visit to Taiwan in 1990. We maintained contact through the years but had not spoken in several. He was an exceptionally fine priest and bishop and I am fortunate to have counted him as a friend and proud that he once considered me a friend as well. My deep sympathies to Grace, an equally wonderful person, and to his children. with much affection, doug phillips Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

Rapidísimas

first_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Por Onell A. SotoPosted Aug 20, 2013 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET El arzobispo de Cantórbery, Justin Welby visitó México los días 13 y 14 de agosto por invitación de Francisco Moreno, arzobispo de la Iglesia Anglicana de México y Obispo de la Diócesis del Norte. Esta visita es parte de una serie de visitas a los Primados de la Comunión Anglicana que el arzobispo Justin hará durante sus primeros 18 meses como Arzobispo. A su llegada a Monterrey arzobispo Justin dijo: “Doy gracias a Dios por ésta oportunidad de visitar México, para ver algo de ésta gran nación y compartir el compañerismo con mis hermanos y hermanas de la Iglesia Anglicana de México. Felicito al arzobispo Moreno al convertirse en su nuevo primado y espero pasar tiempo con él y su pueblo. Deseo expresar especial aprecio por el testimonio de Jesucristo de la Iglesia Anglicana de México, y de su participación en el testimonio de la Comunión Anglicana como un todo en los retos globales tales como: seguridad alimentaria, desarrollo sustentable y cambio climático”. El arzobispo Justin está viajando con su esposa Caroline Welby. La visita a México concluye una visita de siete días a los primados de la región.En esta semana inspectores de las Naciones Unidas están revisando la carga del buque Chong Chon Gang propiedad del gobierno socialista de Corea del Norte que transportaba  armamentos de largo alcance y un avión de fabricación soviética escondidos entre toneladas de azúcar. El barco no informó la naturaleza de su carga según leyes internacionales. Cuba había dicho que el cargamento consistía de “chatarra que necesitaba ser reparada”. En la celebración de su 87 cumpleaños Fidel Castro dijo que la ayuda de Corea del Norte a Cuba ha sido significativa.La devoción del presidente Nicolás Maduro de Venezuela no tiene límites a juzgar por sus palabras por televisión que “a veces vengo por las noches” a dormir en el mausoleo que aloja los restos del difunto presidente Hugo Chávez. Añadió que él y su comitiva emplean el tiempo para “reflexionar” en la revolución bolivariana. La noticia ha sido objeto de no pocas bromas en la población. Maduro lamentó que sus críticos aprovechan sus creencias para desacreditarlo como cuando dijo que Chávez se le ha aparecido en forma de pajarito. Su último error fue decir que “Portugal y Venezuela están en el mismo continente separados por el Mar Caribe”.La jueza Lu Ann Ballew de Tenesí ordenó que un niño de siete meses no podrá ser llamado Mesías porque ese nombre es un título que sólo ha sido ganado por una persona “la persona es nuestro Señor Jesucristo”. En su lugar el niño será llamado Martin DeShawn McCullough. La madre dijo que apelará la decisión de la jueza.A Blanca Reyes Castañón, líder de las Damas de Blanco y representante en Europa de la organización que defiende los derechos humanos en Cuba, no se le dejó entrar en la isla para visitar a su anciano padre de 93 años de edad. La petición de permiso se hizo según las normas del gobierno cubano.La histórica parroquia de la Santa Cruz de Miami ha comenzado a celebrar sus servicios dominicales en la Iglesia de la Resurrección, después que la diócesis del Sureste de la Florida y los líderes de la parroquia alcanzaron un acuerdo de vender la propiedad con miras a buscar un nuevo hogar permanente y más adecuado para el futuro. “En esta etapa de transición, damos la bienvenida a la parroquia de la Santa Cruz y esperamos que su rector  Leonel Ortez y toda su comunidad se sientan en casa”, dijo Alberto Cutié, rector de la Resurrección, quien ajustó el horario de oficios para poder ofrecer un tercer oficio dominical a cargo de la Iglesia de la Santa Cruz.El papa Francisco dijo durante su visita a Brasil en una reunión con obispos y cardenales que hay que recuperar a quienes “buscan respuestas en los nuevos y difusos grupos religiosos.Después de pasar varias semanas internada en un hospital de Miami falleció la popular locutora ecuatoriana Betty Pino, la semana. Era una voz muy querida en el ambiente radial y estrellas como Julio Iglesias, Raphael y Rocío Jurado le agradecieron su ayuda en los principios de sus carreras. La prensa ha informado que murió de una infección bacteriana resistente a los antibióticos.La situación política de Egipto se ha agravado después que la policía egipcia lanzó gas lacrimógeno para dispersar a los seguidores del presidente derrocado Mohamed Mursi. Los muertos y los heridos se cuentan por centenares.VERDAD. Por muy larga que sea la tormenta, el sol siempre vuelve a brillar entre las nubes. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rapidísimas Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY center_img Rector Bath, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more