Tablighi Jamaat: Supreme Court Allows Discharged Persons To Return To Home Country On Furnishing Undertaking To Its Registry

first_imgTop StoriesTablighi Jamaat: Supreme Court Allows Discharged Persons To Return To Home Country On Furnishing Undertaking To Its Registry Mehal Jain16 Jan 2021 6:40 AMShare This – xThe Supreme Court on Wednesday allowed about 27 persons accused in connection with the Tablighi Jamaat congregation, who have been discharged and against which order the government is at present exploring the feasibility of filing a revision, to return to their home countries on giving an undertaking/bond to the registry of the top court.The bench headed by Justice A. M. Khanwilkar was…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Supreme Court on Wednesday allowed about 27 persons accused in connection with the Tablighi Jamaat congregation, who have been discharged and against which order the government is at present exploring the feasibility of filing a revision, to return to their home countries on giving an undertaking/bond to the registry of the top court.The bench headed by Justice A. M. Khanwilkar was informed by senior advocate Menaka Guruswamy, for the petitioners, that 8 persons who were discharged entirely and subsequently, the government’s revision application against the discharge has also come to be decided in their favour, and no further appeal has come to be filed by the Union of India, have been allowed to go home. She advanced that the said 8 petitioners have been permitted to return to their home countries on furnishing a personal surety of Rs. 30,000, a mobile number and an undertaking to join the trial as and when required.ASG K. M. Natraj also confirmed that for the time being, the proceedings stand ended for these 8 people and they have been allowed to go home on giving an undertaking.Ms Guruswamy pointed out that these 8 are a part of a group of 35 persons, all of whom are in Delhi and similarly-situated. She prayed that this order also be enlarged to the 27 others against whom also all proceedings have been disposed off.The ASG submitted that the department is proposing filing revision applications against discharge in the case of these 27 others, but he conceded that, for the time being, they may be allowed to return to their home countries on giving a similar undertaking before the Supreme Court, for no proceedings are pending against them in any other court.The bench observed that the 8 petitioners in respect of whom the discharge order has been confirmed by the revisional court may be allowed to go to their home countries on submitting an undertaking to the revisional court.As regards the others who have been discharged and no revision applications have been filed so far, the bench recorded the ASG’s submission that the department is exploring the feasibility of commencing revision proceedings against these discharge orders. The bench also noted the ASG’s submission that if these others also furnish a similar undertaking/bond, as the aforesaid 8, they may return home, subject to the conditions in the undertaking.The bench, accordingly, directed that these petitioners, who desire to return home and have been discharged by the trial court and no revision application has yet been filed by the department, would be free to file an undertaking/bond in the registry of the apex court. “The nodal officer, after verification and on being satisfied, shall facilitate the return to their home country”, ordered the bench.The bench also directed that as regards the matters pending in the state of UP, the applications under section 482 CrPC for quashing of the order refusing plea bargaining be disposed of as expeditiously as possible.On December 15, the Chief Metropolitan Magistrate, Arun Kumar Garg, Saket Court, Delhi court had dropped all charges against the 36 foreign nationals, citing lack of incriminating evidence.While observing that the plea raised by accused persons is “reasonably probable” that none of them was present at Markaz during the relevant period and they had been picked up from different places so as to maliciously prosecute them, the Saket Court (Delhi) acquitted 36 foreigners facing trial for allegedly flouting COVID guidelines. The accused hailed from a number of countries, including the US, Russia, UK, France, Sudan, Tunisia, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, United Kingdom, Thailand, Kazakhstan and Indonesia.The trial court said that the prosecution failed to prove the presence of any of the accused inside the headquarters of the Tablighi Jamaat between March 12 and April 1, when the alleged violations took placeClick Here To Download Order[Read Order]Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

Centennial Garden

first_imgOne hundred years ago, philanthropist Barbour Lathrop bought a bamboo grove and 46-acre farm and leased the property to the U.S. Department of Agriculture for $1. For the next 60 years, the property became an agricultural research station where, in the 1940s, industrialists Henry Ford and Harvey Firestone cooperated on research on goldenrod as a potential source for latex. Today, the land is the site of the Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens (CGBG) at the Historic Bamboo Farm.The garden’s focus has shifted from research on plants for manufacturing and commercial agriculture to ornamental plants for use in home gardening and landscaping.“A large portion of the plant collection added in that time period is still growing at the garden,” said Tim Davis, Chatham County Cooperative Extension coordinator and director of the gardens. “We grow and maintain more than 100 species here; a tremendous amount of those plants came from Asia because we have similar (climate) zones.”In April, CGBG commemorated its centennial with a public celebration that remembered the past and anticipated the garden’s future.Over the past five years, the gardens have been improved and expanded with the addition of the Andrews Visitors Center, which was funded by a generous donation from Jim Andrews and Barbara Andrews. More recently, the Alan and Sandi Beals Bamboo Maze was added to the gardens.“The property is shifting from a research farm to a botanical garden. We are also home to one of the largest collections of camellias in the Western Hemisphere — more than 800 varieties,” Davis said. The camellia collection was made possible by Chatham County Commissioner and Judge Arthur Solomon, an enthusiast and garden patron who traveled to France and brought camellias back to Savannah, some of which he donated to CGBG.Davis’ vision is to return to the garden’s research-based roots, in keeping with UGA’s land-grant mission, while the facility remains open to the public. A host of new gardens have been added, including a pollinator garden and a home fruit demonstration area. With the help of the gardens’ strong volunteer organization, a Roots and Shoots gardening program for school-aged children will be introduced this fall.“UGA Extension’s goal is to deliver research-based information to the public and we are working to use these gardens as a tool to do that,” Davis said. “This is what we ought to be doing. We study and understand a plant, then we work with the industry to make it economically beneficial and easy for consumers to grow at home.”To learn more about the Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens, go to coastalbg.uga.edu.last_img read more