Delay in deer culling could impact on farms and forests – IDC

first_img Harps come back to win in Waterford FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 By News Highland – September 30, 2020 Pinterest DL Debate – 24/05/21 Twitter The Irish Deer Commission is warning that a delay in issuing deer culling licences is threatening farm and forestry communities in Donegal.Nationally, the National Parks and Wildlife Service says over 41,000 deer were culled by over 5,500 licensed deer hunters in the 12 months to the end of February last year. 1,260 of those deer were culled in Donegal.Now, because so many staff are working from home, there is a backlog of 3,000 license applications, and with rutting season getting underway it’s feared the lack of culling will have an impact.Damien Hannigan is PRO of the Irish Deer Commission………….Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/damiendeer.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Google+ Delay in deer culling could impact on farms and forests – IDC Facebook Twitter WhatsAppcenter_img WhatsApp Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Previous articleBusiness Matters Ep 13 – Catriona O’Donnell & Charlie BoyleNext articleCouncil refuses permission for crematorium at Manorcunningham News Highland News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Facebook Pinterest Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR AudioHomepage BannerNewslast_img read more

Third Sports Games in Sarajevo

first_imgFrom 1 July, the third BH Telecom Youth Sports Games will be held in Sarajevo and will last for four days, reports sportsport.baDuring this event, children compete in several sports such as volleyball, futsal, basketball, handball, chess, table tennis, tennis, etc.More than 29 000 children from the entire BIH applied to participate in this event, which will be held in other cities of BIH as well during summertime.Youth Sports Games have the aim to promote healthy life, friendship, solidarity and fair-play, and they present an alternative to negative trends of contemporary world.last_img read more

Jane leads a Hampshire charge to Par 3 titles

first_img Hampshire players, led by Jane Shergold, pulled off a clean sweep in the English Women’s Par 3 Championship at Ampfield, in their home county.“I’m ecstatic,” said Jane (pictured), from Blackmoor, who won the individual championship with a net score of one-under par 53. She was two ahead of Gillian Fahy from Osborne on the Isle of Wight.Meanwhile, Royal Winchester’s Moya Abbott, Cookie Bridgeman, and Pauline Davies won the team prize with a combined total of 12-over 174 – three clear of their closest challengers.The championship was mostly played in rain but nothing could dampen the spirits of the players who enjoyed the mix of good competition and a dash of garden party atmosphere – helped by a glass of Pimm’s and a slice of cake.The event proved so popular that the original entry limit of 60 players was extended to accommodate over 100 women.Jane, who plays off six handicap and is a regular at England Golf senior championships, remarked: “We played in this last year and enjoyed it so much we came back this year and it’s been absolutely fantastic.“The club have looked after us so well and to finish with Pimm’s and a slice of cake just hits the spot!”Jane started with a double bogey but quickly made up for it with a string of pars, two bogeys and two birdies. “It certainly sharpens up your short game,” she said.The Ampfield course won much praise. Pauline Davies, from the winning team, said: “I live about 10 minutes away and have only played it once before, but I think I’ll be playing it a lot more after today. It’s beautiful, very well maintained and manicured – and tricky!“It’s our first time in the competition but we are definitely going to do it again next year. It was a shame about the weather – but you can’t alter that – but it’s been a wonderful day.”Hampshire players, including those from the Isle of Wight, turned out in large numbers to support the event, but competitors also travelled from further afield, including Devon and Dorset.Click here for full scores 19 Aug 2015 Jane leads a Hampshire charge to Par 3 titles last_img read more

Spend Mother’s Day Weekend At Quinault Beach Resort And Casino

first_imgFacebook4Tweet0Pin0 Some Moms want breakfast in bed followed by an awesome round of slots.  Other moms want a quiet, relaxing day at the spa.  Still other moms prefer a date night with hubby with great food, lively music, and big payouts in the casino.Whatever your Mom has at the top of her list, Quinault Beach Resort and Casino is ready to provide it during Mother’s Day weekend.Take Mom to play her favorite table game.  On Friday and Sunday, play the promotions for a chance to win up to $10,000.  Just last month, Quinault Beach Resort and Casino awarded a lucky player $80,000.  Wouldn’t that rock Mom’s special day?For the spa-loving Moms, luxuriate in a gorgeous hotel room.  Then spend time at the nurturing day spa.  Professional massage therapists provide relaxing treatments.  Treat Mom to a marine hydration spa special for two hours of bliss.Enjoy a delightful meal in the casino’s award winning restaurants.  After a tasty meal, play in the casino.  According to Quinault Beach Resort and Casino, their slots pay out higher than any other area casino.On Friday, Saturday and Sunday night, the fun-loving Mom will enjoy the Silver Sizzles Revue.  A cast all over the age of 50 is sure to entertain and delight the crowds in a Vegas-style revue.  Think glamour, glitz and feathers.  The performers costumes, exciting dance productions, great songs and hilarious comedy will get the entire audience involved.Kim Archer is performing on Friday and Saturday night during Mother’s Day weekend.  The band describes its music as “old school soul, funk and classic rock with sultry blue and original ballads.”  Enjoy live music by Kim Archer in the Ocean Lounge.Whatever way you choose to treat Mom, Quinault Beach Resort & Casino is the place to be.  It’s still fine to gather photos from the customer/organization – this is just another option if you wanted to snap your own shots.Quinault Beach Resort & Casino78 State Route 115Ocean Shores, WA 98569888.461.2214last_img read more

Trinity Hall Bids On Fort Monmouth Property

first_imgBy John BurtonMIDDLETOWN – Trinity Hall, a private religious, secondary school for girls, which has been in a lengthy legal battle to construct a permanent campus here, offered a bid for a building and property at the former Fort Monmouth installation.However, it’s unclear whether the site would be the temporary or permanent headquarters for the school or just a satellite. They are currently temporarily housed at Croydon Hall.Rachel Goemaat, a spokeswoman for the state Economic Development Authority (EDA), said last week Trinity Hall submitted its request to offer to purchase the Child Development Center, a childcare facility, located in Tinton Falls.“Negotiations with the leading proposer are ongoing,” Goemaat said; staffers from the Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority (FMERA) plan to make their recommendations for this and other proposals for other fort properties at an upcoming FMERA public meeting, possibly as soon as next Wednesday, Oct. 21.Goemaat would not say who the “leading proposer” is and would not reveal the other two proposers.FMERA has received three separate proposals for the child development center. The amount of the bid is not a matter of public record, Goemaat said.The child development center is a nearly 20,000 square-foot facility located off of Corregidor Road on the fort grounds, on a 7.4-acre property with a playground.The fort property redevelopment plan initially envisioned the location to continue to be used as a child development center. However, the request for proposals indicated it would consider other commercial uses, such as business offices or technology purposes, according to information provided by the EDA.Repeated attempts to secure a comment from representatives from Trinity Hall were unsuccessful by press time on Wednesday.It’s uncertain if any move would be a temporary one and what this means for the school’s future plans and its efforts to construct its permanent campus on Chapel Hill Road. When the school again won approval from the township planning board in July, Victoria Gmelich, the school’s co-founder and board of trustees member, said, “We’re ready to break ground” on the Chapel Hill Road site and commence construction.Trinity Hall is an independently operated high school and offers a college preparatory and Catholic-based educational curriculum for girls and has been leasing space at the township-owned Croydon Hall, in the Leonardo section.The school had been planning to construct its facility on about 37 acres of an approximately 64-acre undeveloped and largely wooded property on Chapel Hill Road in the area of Kings Highway East. Its plan was to build a facility that could eventually accommodate 500 students.Some area residents have been waging a determined battle against the school’s plans. Objectors maintain the use is too intense for the largely residential area and poses environmental and traffic safety concerns.
Area homeowners took their battle – which at times got quite contentious – to Superior Court looking to overturn local approvals.Following July’s planning board approval, Ron Gasiorowski, the objectors’ lawyer, said there were two continuing lawsuits and possibly a third forth coming opposing the development.Gasiorowski did not return calls to his Red Bank office this week seeking comment for this story.Trinity Hall’s development application was before the planning board on three separate occasions. Initially the local board denied the application with a judge remanding it back to the board after the school appealed, with the judge striking down a portion of a local zoning ordinance.On the second occasion, the board approved the plan, with the judge again remanding it, ruling the board acted improperly by not allowing additional public comment during the hearing. On the third hearing, the board again approved the plan but residents said they would continue the legal fight opposing it.School supporters have insisted the use would be a much less intense use than the alternative. The property had previously been approved for development for 20 single-family homes.The Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority (FMERA) was established after the U.S. Department of Defense closed the 90-year-old Army base in September 2011. The authority is charged with redeveloping the fort’s 1,126 acres of Tinton Falls, Eatontown and Oceanport property for the economic benefit of the region and state.last_img read more

A Vigil Against Hate

first_imgRED BANK — It was planned in a rush last Saturday evening as events were continuing in real time, with the vigil for peace becoming a near-spontaneous outpouring of passion, voicing opposition and anecdotes to the day’s violence.The hastily convened vigil conducted on Aug. 12 at Riverside Gardens Park, West Front Street, attracted between 100 to 150 people. The crowd included Borough Council members Edward Zipprich and Kathy Horgan, candidates for various races, clergy members, and many from the surrounding communities who were motivated to express their concern over the events earlier in the day in Charlottesville, Virginia.There, members of various white supremacist and anti-government groups marched and clashed with counter-protesters over the planned removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee, a confederate Civil War general. The demonstration, labeled the “Unite the Right” rally, conducted by what is often described as “alt-right” groups, including members of the Ku Klux Klan, neo-Nazis, anti-government groups and others expressing support for what they deem “white culture,” offered blatant racist and hate rhetoric.The violence there led to the death of one woman who was struck by a car driven into a crowd earlier on Saturday; two Virginia State Police troopers also died when the helicopter they were flying in to monitor the crowds crashed. Dozens of others were injured in the melee, various media outlets reported.“So much hate has been unleashed,” said the Rev. Virginia Jarocha-Ernst, minister for the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Monmouth County, in Lincroft.But this gathering was for a different reason, she announced. “We are here to say ‘no’ to hate,” Jarocha-Ernst said. “We are here to say ‘no’ to racism.”“May we find a way to end this,” was Jarocha-Ernst’s wish.Red Bank resident Kate Triggiano, who is the co-chair of the Monmouth County Young Progressives Committee and has been active on a number of progressive and liberal political fronts, said she was watching in dismay as the day’s events unfolded on cable TV news. She said she had started to receive calls from friends asking about getting something together in response. “We knew we had to do something, we wanted to do something,” Triggiano said. She explained she began spreading the word through social media, with others on Facebook continuing the thread, with the crowd convening about 8 p.m.The group on hand sang hymns and offered their observations concerning the day’s events.Despite what motivated it, “This is magnificent,” said the Rev. Gilbert Caldwell, looking at the peaceful crowd. Caldwell, a self-described civil rights advocate, said he had participated in the Freedom Summer, when he and others traveled to the South in 1964 to help register African-Americans to vote – facing violence and intimidation by groups like the KKK. “So, I’ve been around a whole lot,” and have seen violence of this type before, he said. “It seems to me in the U.S.A. there are some people who have a problem with people of color,” he added.“It’s time to be angry,” said Rabbi Marc Kline of the Monmouth Reform Temple, Tinton Falls. “It’s time to be angry enough to do something” about the “ignorance that reigns and reigns supreme,” he continued.“Today it is time to stand together,” and to let voices be heard, Kline said. “We have to take this moment to start making phone calls, writing letters,” he advised.“We are on the side of America. We are on the side of freedom. We are on the side of justice,” said Sue Fulton, who was last year’s Democratic candidate for Monmouth County freeholder. “I say we have to remember what side we are on.”Fulton and others criticized President Donald Trump, seeing his comments in response to the day’s events inadequate and tepid. “He didn’t condemn anything,” Fulton said.Trump on Monday offered a more direct condemnation of the various groups after being disparaged from many corners, including from fellow Republicans. In his comments, he called the groups “repugnant.”On Tuesday, however, Trump seemed to reverse himself, telling reporters “both sides” were to blame for the weekend’s violence, unleashing another round of criticism for the president’s views.This article was first published in the Aug. 17-24, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more