Ethical Case for Abolishing all Forms of Surrogacy

first_imgStopSurrogacyNow November 2017Family First Comment: The NZ Herald is currently pushing this issue without a countering view. Here’s one (of many)….“Scientific studies prove that maternal-neonate separation in the crucial months after birth disturbs the baby’s heart rate and sleep and other biological systems, predisposing the child to difficulties later in life which can include relationship and emotional difficulties, mental disorders and illnesses. In taking a child-centered view of surrogacy, we must take into account what we know of the trauma and confusion of separation from the natural family, especially from the birth mother, experienced by adoptees….“The gestational mother is the only person the child knows when they are born. For every single child, their “mother” is acknowledged as the woman who created that baby by taking them from embryo to fully formed infant, throughout nine months of symbiotic gestation, establishing that person’s first relationship with a human adult, the destruction of which damages both mother and child. The gestational mother is the natural parent of her own child, whether or not she used her own eggs or implanted a donor embryo.”All surrogacy is cruel to human infants because even so-called “altruistic surrogacy” demands the removal of the neonate from her or his gestational mother when every aspect, every cell, every desire of that neonate, is geared toward being on the body of the gestational mother, to suckle and seek comfort and safety.As an adoptee, I was removed at birth from my gestational mother, her breasts bound for three days in another room while I screamed for her, and my hospital records record my growing distress. Adoptees around the world testify to their battles with depression and rage, difficulties in trusting and attachment, and a profound sense of loss and grief caused by the loss of their mothers at birth. Scientific studies prove that maternal-neonate separation in the crucial months after birth disturbs the baby’s heart rate and sleep and other biological systems, predisposing the child to difficulties later in life which can include relationship and emotional difficulties, mental disorders and illnesses. In taking a child-centered view of surrogacy, we must take into account what we know of the trauma and confusion of separation from the natural family, especially from the birth mother, experienced by adoptees.The argument that surrogacy can be ethical, as long as it is not commercial and is done “altruistically” for a relative or friend, does not hold up under inquiry. Kajsa Ekis Ekman in Being and Being Bought: Prostitution, Surrogacy and the Split Self points out that “if the procedure is legalised a woman will bear a child as laid out in a contract—the risk that a black market will develop increases . . . Just as trafficking is a consequence of prostitution, commercial and altruistic surrogacy are different levels on the same scale.” In Australia, Ekman’s claim has been borne out. We are the largest consumers of overseas surrogacy despite altruistic surrogacy remaining legal in Australia. Americans and Britons are also dominant among foreign buyers in India despite commercial surrogacy being legal in their own countries or states.So not only is there “no proof that altruistic surrogacy will hold back the commercial market”, but Ekman also points out that all women get paid in surrogacy anyway. For example with holidays, a new wardrobe, school fees for the gestational mother’s other children, and so on.Whether surrogacy is altruistic (in whatever limited sense) or commercial, the fundamental ethical issues remains the same. Ekman sums this up well: “the woman is reduced to a container . . . Pregnancy is made into a function that serves others. Functionalisation always precedes commercialisation, as we have seen in prostitution. In order for something to be sold as separate from the seller, it must first be constituted as a separate function. What happens in the rhetoric of altruistic surrogacy is that it subversively accustoms people to seeing pregnancy as something a woman can lend to others—if she is not selling it.”READ MORE: http://www.stopsurrogacynow.com/ethical-case-for-abolishing-all-forms-of-surrogacy/?utm_source=CBC+Newsletter&utm_campaign=3e631987cf-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_11_02&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_56f2fc828e-3e631987cf-70772305&mc_cid=3e631987cf&mc_eid=e458a49e38#sthash.R1QEJGTl.UpXMqUYy.dpbslast_img read more

Freshman attack Emily Hawryschuk fulfills childhood dream of playing at Syracuse

first_img Published on March 23, 2017 at 1:08 am Contact Nick: [email protected] | @nick_a_alvarez Facebook Twitter Google+ Emily Hawrsychuk idolizes the Syracuse greats who came before her. She spent days in her backyard shooting not at a net, but at the thick trunk of a tree that stood behind her house. She had pictures of SU legends in her room, reminders of their accomplishments and blueprints for her own path.Michelle Tumolo was the first. The 2013-graduate finished with 278 career points (141 goals, 137 assists) and was a finalist for the 2012 Tewaaraton Award. Then it was 2016 graduate Kayla Treanor, a name synonymous with SU lacrosse.As a seventh grader, Hawrsychuk watched her first lacrosse game and became addicted. She spent her middle school days shooting in her backyard mimicking Tumolo’s fierce shots. Imitating Treanor proved a little more difficult.A freshman at Syracuse, Hawrsychuk practices on the same field as Tumolo and Treanor once did, trading the tree for nets in Manley Fieldhouse. She plays under the same head coach, Gary Gait, and is a key contributor for No. 8 Syracuse (8-2, 2-0 Atlantic Coast Conference). The Victor, New York, native’s 15 goals are good for third on the Orange, even though the freshman doesn’t start.“I think she’s a very talented young lady,” Gait said. “She’s out there with the first group. We believe in her.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTreanor’s force and presence on the field could not be easily replicated in a backyard. Before every high school game Hawrsychuk played, she went on YouTube and watched highlights of the SU great. Hawrsychuk’s father, Nick, recalled seeing his daughter come home after games and going straight to the backyard to a bucket of lacrosse balls and net.She hasn’t loved lacrosse her whole life. The first time she picked up a stick was in the seventh grade and her father, who played lacrosse in high school but football in college at Alfred University, recognized his daughter’s skilled hand-eyecoordination and bought her a gift: a $30 stick from Dick’s Sporting Goods.“It was like a tennis racket, but she didn’t care,” Nick said.Hawryschuk, who finished high school with 378 points, didn’t care about what stick she used until she attended one of Gait’s lacrosse camps at SU. She saw the top-of-the-line plastic used by Tumolo and Treanor and realized it was time for an upgrade. Nick remembers spending a “small fortune” on the sticks.He pleaded with his daughter but she didn’t listen. The No. 8 recruit in the country refused to look at other colleges. Hawrsychuk told her father that she would one day play for Syracuse after watching a game on television.The pair made the 70-mile trek east on Interstate-90 to watch games in the Carrier Dome. Hawrsychuk got a first-person look at her heroes. During their first trip to the Dome, the two sat behind the visiting team’s bench all alone in a sea of concrete. They soon realized their error and laughed when they saw crowds pile in behind SU’s bench, the customary place for Orange fans to sit.“We didn’t know what to expect,” Emily Hawrsychuk said, laughing at the memory. “From then on, we sat on the right side.”Six years later, the Hawrsychuks still go to every game. Nick remains in the stands, now sitting with his younger sons and admiring the current crop of SU stars. Emily, meanwhile, plays on the Carrier Dome turf, cutting, dashing and scoring just like the people in the pictures in her bedroom once did. Commentslast_img read more