Where are mobile payments going?

first_imgMobile has become the prevailing discussion in the payments world. Twenty-two percent of mobile phone users reported having made a mobile payment transaction during 2014. This is an increase from seventeen percent in 2013 and fifteen percent in 2012. Since ApplePay burst onto the scene in October of last year, companies like Samsung, Android, and Google are ramping up their versions of a mobile payments platform.ApplePay has almost singlehandedly set Near Field Communications (NFC) as the prevailing method of conducting a mobile transaction. The good news for merchants is that NFC technology is already included in most current POS terminals due to the migration over to EMV. While ApplePay is by far the most recognized brand, users of the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus represent only eight percent of the U.S. smartphone market while Android users total twenty-six percent of that market but both of those figures continue to grow.A looming battle remains for Samsung and Android, both of which have announced a mobile payment solution. Will they both coexist on one device? What value does AndroidPay bring to Samsung Pay and vice versa? Perhaps a clearer picture will emerge at the close of 2015.The next step for these mobile payment platforms is rewards. Android Pay will include a rewards feature in its system. Apple announced that it would introduce a rewards program to integrate in the ApplePay ecosystem as well. From a merchant’s perspective, the question is, “Who will pay for it?”What does this mean for credit unions? As the mobile landscape develops and credit unions roll out mobile products, here are some things to keep in mind. Credit unions will need to ensure that their mobile product is bringing a great user experience that will build loyalty instead of an ApplePay or an Android Pay taking front and center of the experience. Also, one must keep in mind that while paying with a mobile device may be innovative and elegant, there are still some kinks to be worked out in the system. For example, merchant adoption is imperative. Apple is set to hit acceptance in one million stores next month, but it still lacks acceptance in stores like Wal-Mart, Target, and CVS, whereas the traditional mag stripe card is generally accepted everywhere.Next is user acceptance. A survey of 3,800 iPhone 6 and 6 plus users revealed that only thirteen percent had actually conducted an Apple Pay transaction and only eleven percent said that they planned to do so in the future. The majority of users that have not used Apple Pay stated that their credit/debit card worked just fine.The millennial age group primarily dominates the mobile payments world in terms of usage. Of the respondents surveyed by the Federal Reserve, thirty-four percent of users between ages 18-29 conducted a mobile transaction in 2014, followed by thirty-one percent between the ages of 30-44. Breaking it down further, the most common mobile payment activity was paying bills at sixty-eight percent, followed by fifty-four percent in online or in-app purchases. The next most common activity was paying in store for a product or service which came in at thirty-nine percent. Mobile transactions at the point of sale are becoming more prevalent due to these new products, such as ApplePay, making it easier.The idea of paying with your mobile device at the point of sale is good and convenient, however what problem does it actually solve? Having all your debit and credit cards, gift cards, and automatically tracked loyalty points in one place on your phone gives us reason to believe that the idea of a mobile wallet is a good one. Now it’s a matter technology, time, acceptance and adoption that will determine which of today’s solutions will bridge the gap between the wallet and the smartphone. 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Christopher Poole Christopher Poole Joined CU24 in 2014. Mr. Poole is responsible for providing network technical support and guidance, managing implementation of network interfaces, ensuring processors are in compliance with Network Operating … Web: www.cu24.com Detailslast_img read more

Leafs first to ten after outlasting Bruins 6-5 in Boundary City

first_imgKyle Dolley, with Aaron Dunlap serving a four-minute spearing penalty, and Tucker Brown scored before the period ended to pull the Brins to within one goal before the period ended.The teams traded goals in the second — Wellman with this second and Michael Rand replying for the Bruins.In the third Vlanich scored his first of two before Max Newtown made the score 5-4.After Vlanich scored into an empty net, Dolly made the game a little interesting with a marker at the 19:52 mark.Tyler Moffat was once again in goal to register the win as Nelson search for a replacement for Adam Maida, lost to the team due to a knee injury.Nelson remains on top of the Murdoch Division with a 10-0-1-1 record.The Bruins fall to 6-6-1-0 and sit fourth in Murdoch standings.ICE CHIPS: Jamie Vlanich (10-19-29) finished the game with six points to move into second spot in KIJHL scoring race, one point behind Nick Josephs of Kelowna. Teammate Travis Wellan (19-7-26) is tied for third. . . . Nelson netminder Tyler Moffat leads the KIJHL in wins with eight. Moffat, who played the last two seasons in Creston, is fifth overall in goalies with a .906 save percentage. . . .Jackson Purvis (9-15-24) of Grand Forks is tied for fifth in KIJHL scoring. . . .Nelson takes to the road for a three-game swing through the Okanagan/Shuswap Conference with stops in Armstrong (Friday), Kelowna (Saturday) and Summerland (Sunday). . . .Next up for Grand Forks is a home date Saturday against Castlegar Rebels. The Nelson Leafs ran its record to a Kootenay International Junior Hockey League high ten games by outlasting the Grand Forks Border Bruins 6-5 Saturday night in the Boundary City.Jamie Vlanich’s second goal of the game, into an empty net, proved to be the winner as Nelson held off the vastly improved Bruins.The win came on the heels of an amazing comeback Friday against Beaver Valley. Nelson trailed 4-0 entering the third period before rallying for a 6-4 victory.The Leafs led from start to finish, opening up a 3-0 lead six minutes into the contest on goals by Travis Wellman, Brandon Sookro and Alec Wilkerson.Wilkerson’s goal was on the power play.last_img read more

Santa Clara re-releases Reuben Foster video with unredacted audio

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos or video on a mobile deviceSANTA CLARA — Officials on Tuesday released a second version of police body-camera video from an Oct. 12 domestic dispute with former San Francisco 49ers linebacker Reuben Foster and the girlfriend behind his infamous legal troubles, after deciding the initial disclosure by Santa Clara police improperly redacted an audio portion of officers’ conversations.Police swiftly pushed back at the implication, and …last_img read more

Multiple Independent Animal Types Use Structural Color

first_img(Visited 386 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 The phenomenon is found in butterflies, fish, birds, and snakes, and scientists are rushing to imitate their secrets.At The Conversation, Colin Hall and Eric Charrault describe the gold rush for structural color. These are colors made not with pigments, but with nanometer-scale structures that play tricks with light, intensifying some wavelengths and diminishing others. Coming up with a way to make Vantablack, a structural color that absorbs 99.6% of the light hitting it, was a feat of engineering:To put this in perspective, if you think of a forest of trees about a metre in diameter, then these trees would scale to be around one kilometre high. Light falling on this very tall forest of tubes bounces around and is almost perfectly absorbed.The article on cutting-edge attempts to create new colors with structure includes photographs and descriptions of very diverse animals that use this technique:Butterflies, that create iridescent colors on their scales. (see 6/15/10)A snake that has some of the blackest scales found in nature.Sardines with silvery sides.Live Science shares another secret: “Butterfly Wing Optics Help to Cheaply Create Bright, Realistic Holograms.” The blurry holograms seen at concerts, in movies and on credit cards could much more colorful and clear, David Roos reports, by mimicking the nanostructures on butterfly wing scales.We know from previous reports on structural colors or “photonic crystals” that birds, spiders, beetles and mammals also use them (6/05/08). These diverse animals could not have gotten their secrets by descent from a common ancestor because many intermediate animals in the evolutionary scheme do not have them. The only other way for evolution to handle this would be for the common ancestor to have the secret, but most animals down the line lost it. That would also create a challenge: how did the common ancestor come up with a trick like that? There’s only one cause that we know of that can share technology across multiple, independent platforms. That cause is – you guessed it – intelligent design.last_img read more

New light on human ancestor’s diet

first_img28 June 2012 A South African-led research team working on Australopithecus sediba, the 2-million-year-old human ancestor recently discovered in South Africa, have published new findings on what our early ancestors ate that are causing a stir in scientific circles. It’s clear that these hominins didn’t brush their teeth on the morning nearly two-million years ago when they fell into a sinkhole not far from present-day Johannesburg. Remains of their meal have been found in plaque in their teeth. The 1.9-million year old Australopithecus sediba, found in South Africa’s Cradle of Humankind by professor Lee Berger of Wits University in 2008, reveal that these hominins ate parts of trees, shrubs or herbs. Berger, Reader in Human Evolution and the Public Understanding of Science at the Institute for Human Evolution at Wits, led the team, comprising nine leading scientists from across the globe, that published the latest findings on Australopithecus sediba.A (very) long-overdue trip to the dentist … While examining the teeth of the two individuals so far excavated, Berger noticed stains or plaque on the teeth – tartar or calculus, a mineralised material that forms on teeth. “In this plaque, the scientists found phytoliths, bodies of silica from plants eaten almost two-million years ago by these early hominins,” the research team said in a statement this week. The well-preserved teeth were analysed in different ways. Dental micro-wear analyses of the tooth surfaces and high-resolution isotope studies of the tooth enamel were conducted. “We have a very unusual type of preservation in this instance as the state of the teeth was pristine,” said Peter Ungar, distinguished professor of anthropology at the University of Arkansas and the scientist responsible for conducting the dental micro-wear studies of the teeth. Multi-disciplinary research team The research was published in the online edition of the prestigious journal Nature on Wednesday, and will appear in the 5 July print edition. The main author is Amanda Henry of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany, a specialist in dental calculus and tartar. Other specialists on the multi-disciplinary team included dental micro-wear specialists, isotopic specialists and phytolith researchers – scientists who study the physical remains of ancient plants. “We have been very lucky to bring together such a diverse group of talented individuals to conduct this study,” said Henry. Using the isotope analysis, the dental micro-wear analysis and the phytolith analysis, the researchers “closed in on the diet of these two individuals, and what they found differs from other early human ancestors from that period. “The micro-wear on the teeth showed more pits and complexity than most other australopiths before it. The phytoliths gave an even clearer picture of what the animals were consuming, including bark, leaves, sedges, grasses, fruit and palm,” the statement reads. Animal that took advantage of forest resources Tests were conducted on the surrounding sediments in the area, to ensure the samples from the plaque were really part of the diet, and not contamination from elsewhere. “By testing the sediments in which the hominid was buried we can be sure that the phytoliths in the calculus were not from post-depositional contamination,” said professor Marion Bamford from the Bernard Price Institute for Palaeontology at Wits, who worked on the phytolith analysis. “These findings tell us a really nice story about these two individuals. We get a sense of an animal that looked like it was taking advantage of forest resources,” adds Ungar. “This kind of food consumption differs from what has been seen in evidence from other australopiths. They come out looking like giraffes in terms of their tooth chemistry. A lot of the other creatures there were not eating such forest resources.” The finding has been creating great excitement in the scientific world. Bark … not expected “The find is unprecedented in the human record outside of fossils just a few thousand years old. It is the first truly direct evidence of what our early ancestors put in their mouths and chewed – what they ate,” said Berger. “I found the evidence for bark consumption the most surprising,” said Berger. “While primatologists have known for years that primates, including apes, eat bark as a fallback food in times of need, I really had not thought of it as a dietary item on the menu of an early human ancestor.” Matt Sponheimer, a Professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder, who worked on the isotopic research, explains: “The results suggested a different diet than we have found in other early hominins, and were rather like what we find in living chimpanzees. We were not expecting Sediba to look unlike Australopithecus and Homo as various researchers have suggested affinities to one genus or the other, or both.”New hominin species In 2010, Berger and his colleagues unveiled the 2008 find, an entirely new hominin species. In September 2011, the almost complete hand skeleton of sediba was unveiled, together with the brain, hip, foot and ankle. Five papers detailing the findings and analysis of the discovery were published in the prestigious journal Science. The very evolved hand with a long thumb, like a human, with long arms like an ape, indicate that sediba was bipedal but also able to climb. The hand also suggests that sediba was capable of tool manufacture and use. The advanced pelvis and long legs suggest it was able to stride and possibly even run like a human. Sediba has been described as a “transitional species” between Australopithecus africanus and either Homo habilis or Homo erectus. Other animal fossils have been found with the sediba bones – sabre-toothed cats, hyenas, antelopes, mice, birds and snails. Sediba is a Sotho word for a well or a spring; the species was so named because it was hoped that “a great source of information will spring from the fossils”. Source: City of Johannesburglast_img read more

Workers key to SA democracy: Zuma

first_img2 May 2013South Africa’s democracy would not be sustainable or successful if the plight of the working class, employed and unemployed, was not sufficiently attended to, President Jacob Zuma said on Wednesday.Speaking at the main Congress of SA Trade Unions (Cosatu) Workers’ Day rally in Kimberly, Northern Cape, Zuma said that the African National Congress (ANC) had a strong bias towards the working class and poor.“The ANC bias towards the working class does not mean we have abdicated our responsibility as a liberation movement to mobilize the broadest strata of society for fundamental transformation.“It simply means we have correctly understood that our democracy will not be stable, sustainable and successful if the plight of the working class, employed or unemployed, is not sufficiently attended to,” Zuma said.Workers’ rights such as the right to fair labour practices and the right to form and join trade unions were enshrined in the Constitution. “These are very important rights which must not be taken for granted.”Zuma said a tendency to divide workers or undermine collective bargaining among others should be guarded against.“Unity within Cosatu is paramount. We need a united Cosatu that is able to devote its attention to promoting the rights of workers. Thus we urge the labour movement to work seriously at uniting the federation and to resolve whatever differences there may exist.”Workers were the creators of the country’s wealth and they had to get an equitable share in the wealth, Zuma said, adding that attention needed to be paid to the plight of mineworkers and farm workers.“As we focus on miners and farm workers, we also remember those workers who tragically lost their lives in Marikana in the North West and related violent incidents. We have to draw lessons from Marikana.”The National Development Plan (NDP) was the country’s socio-development blueprint for the next 20 years, Zuma said.“We reiterate that those who have views about the NDP should feel free to raise them in the spirit of the democratic culture within the movement … Views cannot be suppressed. However, work is continuing to implement the NDP.”At government level, the Department of Performance Monitoring and Evaluation has already begun developing a draft medium-term strategic framework for 2014-2019, as the first five-year building block of the NDP.The intention is to submit the first draft of the 2014-2019 NDP-aligned framework to the 2013 July Cabinet lekgotla. This can then be refined so that it can be submitted to the new Cabinet for approval as soon as possible after the 2014 elections.This will enable departments to include the new targets in their individual five-year strategic plans, which they will be starting to work on later this year and in early 2014.Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Taking it slow, Pacquiao leaves for Australia underweight

first_imgView comments Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken 1 dead in Cavite blast, fire LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. The unexpected break may yet turn out to be a blessing in disguise as Pacquiao is already primed up for his World Boxing Organization welterweight title bout against Jeff Horn on July 2.On Friday night, Pacquiao told sportswriters that he has learned to listen to his body.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“Before, I can do 32 rounds and recover overnight. Now, [recovering] takes me a longer time, so I have to slow down sometimes,” Pacquiao said.Chief trainer Freddie Roach knows that, of course. Though the eight-division world champion still trains as hard as before, it now requires little persuasion for Pacquiao to stick to the training routine. MOST READ Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ WATCH: Firefighters rescue baby seal found in parking garage Cayetano to unmask people behind ‘smear campaign’ vs him, SEA Gamescenter_img Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ What ‘missteps’? Fortune agreed, wishing that Pacquiao would climb to 146.5 lb during the official weigh-in on July 1.Notes: Team Pacquiao’s use of the Air Asia chartered plane was facilitated by Eric Arejola, ground operations head of Air Asia Phil. Though the plane has a 377 seating capacity there were only 187 passengers on board for the direct flight to Brisbane.Visit Inquirer Sports’ The Pacquiao Files  for news, features, and other multimedia content about Manny Pacquiao and his upcoming fights.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netGEN. SANTOS City—Intermittent rains led to the cancellation of Manny Pacquiao’s scheduled hilly morning run Saturday, hours before his chartered plane took off for Australia.To make up for that, strength and conditioning coach Justin Fortune made him do several laps around his covered basketball court within the confines of his mansion here.ADVERTISEMENT SMB, TNT out to break tie World’s 50 Best Restaurants launches new drinking and dining guide Unlike years before, when the Fighting Senator would usually request for additional rounds of gym work.Although he’s hoping for a knockout, Roach knows that Pacquiao can very well go the full 12 rounds if necessary at the 52,500-seat Suncorp Stadium in Brisbane.The only thing that poses some concern for Roach is Pacquiao’s “lightness.”Despite eating voraciously at least four times a day, Pacquiao weighed only 142 pounds Thursday, five lb below the division’s limit.Roach wants Pacquiao to be between 145 to 146 pounds at this point as Horn will definitely be at least 10 lb heavier on fight night.ADVERTISEMENT Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Gameslast_img read more

10 months ago​AC Milan enquire about Fulham midfielder Johansen

first_img​AC Milan enquire about Fulham midfielder Johansenby Ansser Sadiq10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAC Milan are interested in signing Fulham midfielder Stefan Johansen.The 27-year-old was a key member of the team that won promotion under Slavisa Jokanovic last season.But the Norway skipper has only managed to start 4 Premier League games this term.The likes of Jean Michael Seri and Calum Chambers are ahead of him in the pecking order.Per Sky in Italy, Milan are looking to sign him this winter on a cut price deal – or on a free in the summer. TagsTransfersAbout the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Health Canada approves safe injection site for Calgary temporary site opens soon

first_imgCALGARY – Health Canada has approved a safe injection site for opioid drugs in Calgary.Alberta Health says a temporary site will open soon in the parking area of the Sheldon M. Chumir Health Centre while a permanent site inside the centre is being constructed.Alberta Health says patients will also be able to get treatment, including suboxone, methadone, and counselling.Evidence shows that supervised consumption services save lives, reduce transmission of infections by providing sterile needles and equipment and build safer communities by reducing public substance use and discarded needles.Last week, Health Canada approved four safe injection sites for Edmonton and one for Lethbridge, and those are expected to open later this year or early next year.Jessica Holtsbaum of the group Changing the Face of Addiction, called it great news.“It will save lives and provide those with substance-use disorders an access point to further treatment. It is a long overdue step in the right direction. However, this is only one small step and momentum can’t end here.”The province is providing $2.2 million for startup costs and for construction of the temporary and permanent locations at the Chumir health centre. The province will also provide operational funding for all six supervised consumption sites approved for Alberta.As of mid-August 2017, 315 people have died of apparent fentanyl-related overdoses in Alberta. There were 586 suspected opioid-related deaths in the province last year.The Canadian Institute for Health Information has said data from Alberta suggests emergency room visits related to heroin and synthetic opioid overdoses spiked almost 10-fold in the last five years.The first safe consumption sites in Canada were set up in Vancouver. Health Canada has approved other sites in Montreal and Toronto.Last month, Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada’s chief public health officer, said at least 2,816 Canadians died from opioid-related causes in 2016 and that number is expected to grow this year.last_img read more

Ottawa failing to respond in face of Attawapiskat crisis NDP MP

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe state of emergency in Attawapiska First Nation isn’t getting the response the community was hoping for.The chief of the community declared the state of emergency because people were living in tents and, with temperatures plunging, the situation there is getting desperate.APTN National News reporter Annette Francis has this story.last_img