Florida voters deliver gambling expansion setback

first_img Electorate backs developments in Arkansas and Louisiana Regions: US Arkansas Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Topics: Legal & compliance Sports betting Florida voters deliver gambling expansion setback Legal gambling could be less likely in Florida after voters chose to give themselves rather than politicians the power to progress expansion in the state.Florida, Arkansas and Louisiana each held plebiscites on gambling issues on Tuesday, as the public participated in the midterm elections.In Florida, the Disney-backed Amendment 3, which states that citizens will retain exclusive rights to authorise and potentially expand casino gambling in the state, received about 70% of the vote.Voters in Charge, backed by the entertainment and theme park giant as well as the Seminole Tribe, which is the state’s leading gaming operator, spent around $31m on the campaign to prevent politicians from expanding gambling. Those against Amendment 3 included DraftKings, FanDuel, racing operators and the NFL’s Miami Dolphins.It is believed the difficulties in getting gambling expansion onto the ballot and then persuading more than 60% of voters to back it makes any development unlikely in the near future.Meanwhile, a majority of voters (54%) in Arkansas backed Issue 4, which allows four new casinos and enables them to offer sports betting. Two racetracks will expand to offer casino gaming while two wholly new venues are planned.The Arkansas Racing Commission now has 120 days to come up with rules to vet casino operator applicants, with licences to be issued by June 2019.“This is really exciting,” said Alex Gray, counsel for the Driving Arkansas Forward committee that sponsored the ballot measure, which argued the casinos would boost state coffers and create jobs. Meanwhile, voters in Louisiana have overwhelmingly backed the legalisation of daily fantasy sports.Cities including New Orleans and Baton Rouge are among the 47 of the state’s 64 parishes where contests will now be allowed.The vote was a success for sector giants DraftKings and FanDuel, which spent a combined $1m lobbying on the issue.Image: AdamFirstcenter_img 8th November 2018 | By contenteditor Legal & compliance AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Addresslast_img read more

Wiggin European regulation roundup – May 2020

first_img In conjunction with Chris Elliott and Beth French of Wiggin LLP, iGB provides a regulatory snapshot of igaming across Europe. Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Spain and Sweden are among those updated for this edition, with a number of these related to the Covid-19 pandemic Tags: Card Rooms and Poker Online Gambling Slot Machines Wiggin European regulation roundup – May 2020 Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Address Topics: Casino & games Legal & compliance Sports betting Bingo Poker Slots Table gamescenter_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter In conjunction with Chris Elliott and Beth French of Wiggin LLP, iGB provides a regulatory snapshot of igaming across Europe. Belgium, Cyprus, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and Sweden are among those updated for this edition, with a number of these related to the Covid-19 pandemicAUSTRIA Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Licences for sports betting and horse race betting are available for private operators on a regional basis within Austria, whereas poker, casino, bingo and lottery are controlled by the monopoly, Casinos Austria, which has exclusive rights until 2027. Status: The CJEU has held that the Austrian casino monopoly is incompatible with EU law in a number of cases, although national courts continue to reach conflicting decisions on the compatibility of Austria’s current gambling legislative framework with EU law and the position remains unclear.BELGIUM Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: All products are available to private operators except for lotteries, which are reserved exclusively for the monopoly provider. However, online operators need to partner with a land-based licence holder in order to satisfy a local establishment requirement; alternatively, apply for one of the retail licences that can be extended to cover online. Status: There remain valid arguments that the existing regime is incompatible with Belgium’s EU Treaty obligations. Active enforcement measures against operators and players are in place. A mandatory, weekly deposit limit of €500 for all customers of licensed operators is in place. A draft law to introduce an advertising and sponsorship ban has been submitted to parliament.BULGARIA Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery (excluding raffles and instant lottery games). Operator type: All products are available to private operators except for lotteries, which are to be reserved exclusively for the monopoly. Status: Any operator from an EU/EEA jurisdiction or the Swiss Confederation can apply for a licence. The Bulgarian regulator has awarded approximately 30 licences to date, including to a number of international operators. The government has adopted amendments to the country’s gambling legislation to establish a monopoly on lotteries in Bulgaria, with any existing lottery licences to be revoked with immediate effect following the amendment’s entry into force.CROATIA Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: All products are available to private operators except for lotteries, which are reserved exclusively for the monopoly provider. Private operators can only be licensed to offer online gambling if they obtain a land-based casino or betting licence. Status: Attempts by the Ministry to update its gambling legislation have been subject to criticism in respect of EU incompatibility issues (including the requirement that only holders of land-based licences can offer online gambling). Regulatory reforms appear to have stalled in the country.CYPRUS Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting and lottery. Operator type: OPAP has a monopoly over lottery operations; betting licences are available to private operators. Status: Cyprus regulated online betting in July 2012, although a licensing regime was not established until 2016. ISPs are obliged to implement blocking measures to prohibit Cypriot residents from accessing unlicensed gambling websites. A new betting law, which entered into force in March 2019, replaces the 2012 Betting Law. The provisions of the new law are substantially the same, with minor amends introduced to address EU incompatibility concerns under the previous law (such as the requirement to have a local branch in order to obtain a betting licence). An overhaul to player protection measures has been proposed by the betting regulator.CZECH REPUBLIC Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: EU and EEA-based operators are able to apply for licences. Status: The new gambling regulatory regime entered into force in the Czech Republic on 1 January 2017, allowing EU/EEA companies to enter the market. ISP-blocking measures are active in the jurisdiction. Tax rates reportedly increased to up to 30% of GGR for certain online gambling activities from January 2020.DENMARK Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, fantasy sports, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Licences for all gambling products are available to private operators save for lotteries, which are controlled by the state monopoly. Status: The Danish online gambling regime went live on 1 January 2012. ISP-blocking measures are active in the jurisdiction and the Danish Gaming Authority (DGA) has been granted an injunction to block operators and suppliers that have been targeting Danish customers without the requisite licence. As of 1 January 2020, licensed operators are required to ensure that customers have set deposit limits before they are allowed to gamble, although it is understood this applies to online casino only. The regulator has introduced new marketing regulations, effective from 1 April 2020.ESTONIA Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Licences for all gambling products are available to private operators save for lotteries, which are reserved exclusively for the monopoly operator. Status: Operators seeking to accept business from players in Estonia must be issued an activity licence for the type of gambling they wish to offer, then an operating permit to provide the services online. A blacklist of operators is maintained and updated by local authorities and ISP and payment blocking is in force. Though some operators argue that the regime is still not compatible with EU law, no notification alleging incompatibility has been issued by the EC since the requirement for licensees to main servers in Estonia was removed.FINLAND Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: All gambling products are under the exclusive control of monopoly provider Veikkaus Oy. Status: Despite the existence of a national monopoly, EC enforcement action was dropped subsequent to various changes to Finnish laws. Active enforcement measures are in place (restrictive marketing for offshore operators in particular) and the government is exploring measures to further restrict the offshore supply of gambling services. The Finnish Competition and Consumer Authority recently published a report criticising the existing regime, citing failures of the current monopolistic system that arguably raise questions over the regime’s compatibility with EU law. Maximum loss limits have been lowered by government decree until 30 September 2020 (applicable to monopoly provider Veikkaus Oy) in light of the Covid-19 pandemic.FRANCE Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Private operators can obtain online licences for sports betting, horse race betting and poker. The monopoly has exclusive rights to bingo and lottery. Status: A regulated market since the introduction of a licensing regime in 2010, following which the EC withdrew its infringement proceedings. Ordinance 2019-1015, which was published in the French Official Journal in October 2019, amends the existing gambling legislation and establishes a new regulatory authority, L’autorité Nationale des Jeux, for land-based and online gambling (said to be effective from Spring 2020). Responsible gambling advice has been issued to operators and players during the Covid-19 crisis, with a warning against using bonuses to attract new players to poker.GERMANY Regulated gambling products: Schleswig-Holstein, a small northern-German state, regulates sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino and bingo. The other 15 states of Germany currently permit only sports betting and horse race betting. Operator type: Private operators can no longer obtain casino licences in Schleswig-Holstein under the existing regime, although S-H has approved legislation to reinstate existing licences until 2021 (with operations allowed to continue in the interim). S-H has also introduced a quasi licensing regime for sports betting (intended to be of a transitional nature). In the other 15 states, horse race betting licences are available at a regional level. Sports betting licences can be applied for by private operators as of 1 January 2020, albeit the licensing process has been suspended following a ruling of Administrative Court of Darmstadt in April (currently the subject of appeal). Status: The main legal framework for gambling regulation in Germany has been the subject of much debate and has been heavily criticised by the EC and interested parties/states within Germany for a number of years. Discussions to reform the existing legislation have resulted in the approval of the 3rd Amendment Treaty which, following ratification on 18 December 2019, entered into force on 1 January 2020. The 3rd Amendment Treaty  removes the limit on the number of sports betting licences and re-introduces a sports betting licensing process. The ban on online casino remains in place, although there is an exception to the prohibition for S-H. An increase in enforcement action is expected now the 3rd Amendment Treaty is in effect. On 12 March 2020, the German prime ministers approved the new Interstate Treaty on Gambling which proposes to  allow private operators to obtain a licence to offer online slots for the first time (although stringent restrictions, such as stake limits, are expected to be implemented). The Treaty, which is scheduled to enter into force from 1 July 2021, still needs to be ratified by state parliaments before becoming law. Enforcement action continues, including a recent interdiction order issued to a payment services provider.GREAT BRITAIN Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: All licences are available to private operators save for lottery, which is reserved exclusively for the monopoly provider, Camelot. Status: Any operator that transacts with, or advertises to, British residents requires a licence from the Gambling Commission (GC). Licensed operators are required to source gambling software from GC-licensed businesses. Licensed operators are prohibited from allowing consumers to use credit cards to gamble (including online and land-based gambling with the exception of non-remote lotteries) as of 14 April 2020. The GC is set to consider the introduction of stake limits online, with a decision to be made within the next six months. Members of the Betting and Gaming Council, a UK trade group, have agreed to stop TV and radio advertising during the coronavirus lockdown.GREECE Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting and lottery. Operator type: All products are exclusively reserved for the monopoly providers pending the implementation of an open licensing regime, although 24 transitional licences for private operators remain active, with all products permitted. Status: In 2012, a ‘transition period’ commenced, whereby the Greek government granted 24 transitional licences to operators, enabling them to provide services to Greek residents. Legislation, which will introduce an open licensing regime for online betting and “other online games”, including casino and poker, entered into force on 30 October 2019. The new regime was not implemented by 31 March 2020 as was originally envisaged. As a result, the regulator confirmed that transitionally licensed operators could continue to offer their services under “temporary” licences provided such operators had submitted an application for a permanent licence prior to 31 March 2020.HUNGARY Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Only the state monopolies (Szerencsejáték Zrt. and Magyar Lóversenyfogadást-Szervezo Kft) and local concession companies can apply for a licence. Status: Amendments to Hungarian gambling law came into force on 1 October 2015 and allow only two land-based casinos to hold remote casino concessions. The regulator has since issued fines, a number of which have been challenged, against unlicensed operators that continue to target the market. In June 2017, the ECJ determined Hungary’s gambling regime to be incompatible with Article 56 TFEU. A subsequent ECJ decision in February 2018 ruled against the Hungarian requirement that online gambling operators must have a land-based licence to offer online gambling services to Hungarian citizens, further strengthening arguments that the current regime is incompatible with EU law.IRELAND Regulated gambling products: Online betting regulated since August 2015. Online gaming is not specifically accounted for in Ireland’s outdated legislation and as such is currently unregulated. Operator type: Private operators can apply for a betting licence. Status: Ireland has contemplated updating its legislation, which will create a comprehensive igaming regime, for some time. The Gambling Control Bill – the legislation which promises to specifically regulate online gambling – has been subject to continued delay and legislative progress is not expected in the short- to medium-term.ITALY Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Fully regulated market, although lotteries are the subject of a state monopoly. Status: Remote gambling licences are granted within specific application windows. The last tender process for applications closed on 19 March 2018. AGCOM, the Italian communications regulator, recently issued its first sanction against an operator for violation of the advertising ban (introduced in 2018). New measures to combat unlicensed gambling, including payment blocking measures, entered into effect in October 2019. The 2020 Budget Law provides for the organisation of a tender for the issuance of licences by 31 December 2020 – it is understood there will be 40 licences available for online gambling.LUXEMBOURG Regulated gambling products: Lottery. Operator type: Monopoly. Status: The general prohibition on gambling appears sufficiently wide to cover all forms of online gambling.MALTA Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Private operators can apply for a local licence (except for lottery products). Status: In 2018, Malta has approved a new Gaming Act that replaced all existing gaming legislation with a single piece of legislation, supplemented by secondary legislation. The Gaming Act, with directives and regulations, became effective 1 August 2018.NETHERLANDS Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Monopoly for all products. Status: The Remote Gambling Bill, intended to introduce a new regime, is expected to enter into force on 1 January 2021, with a six-month window for licence applications. It is understood that operators that have directly ‘targeted’ the Dutch market will face a 30-month cooling-off period before being eligible for a licence. Full implementation of a licensing regime is not expected until 1 July 2021, albeit local experts consider this target increasngly unlikely. In the interim, the regulator is expected to continue to implement enforcement measures against operators targeting Dutch players.NORWAY Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting and lottery. Operator type: Online gambling is reserved for the two monopoly providers, Norsk Tipping and Norsk Rikstoto. Status: The monopoly has extended its offering to include live betting, online bingo and casino games in an attempt to redirect traffic from unlicensed sites. The Norwegian regulator continues to step up enforcement efforts against unregulated operators, local banks and payment service providers. The government has proposed  legislative changes to stem the flow of gambling supply from offshore, including enhanced enforcement powers to prevent gambling advertising from abroad. Expanded payment blocking provisions entered into effect on 1 January 2020.POLAND Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, casino and poker. Operator type: Betting licences are available for companies with a representative in Poland. Casino and poker are reserved for a state monopoly. Status: Legislation enacted 1 January 2012 permits betting. Online gaming (including poker) is no longer prohibited as of 1 April 2017, although the exclusive rights to offer such products are reserved for a state monopoly. Provisions that provide for the establishment of a blacklist of unlicensed operators and ISP and payment blocking came into force on 1 July 2017. The blacklist contains more than 1,000 domain names. PORTUGAL Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Any EU/EEA operator can apply to be granted a licence for online gambling. Lottery games and land-based fixed-odds sports betting remain reserved for a monopoly. Status: A regulated market since 2015. Although operators can apply for licences, their Portuguese revenue streams are subject to comparatively high tax rates, particularly in sports betting. Portugal’s 2020 Budget will implement changes to the current taxation rates applicable to selected gambling products offered online. The Portuguese government has instituted legislation that imposes a partial or total ban on online gambling for the duration of the Covid-19 pandemic. The legislation does not state the specifics on the limitations, but it is understood that it will apply to online casino only (if implemented).ROMANIA Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Any operator from an EU/EEA jurisdiction or the Swiss Confederation can apply for a licence. Lottery games remain reserved for the monopoly. Status: The Gambling Law (as amended) introduced a legal framework for a fully regulated online gambling market and requires licences to be held by online gambling operators, as well as software providers, payment processors, affiliates and testing labs. After some delay, the secondary legislation that fully implemented the new licensing regime came into force on 26 February 2016. The gambling regulator actively polices the regime and notifies ISPs to block blacklisted websites.SLOVAKIA Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Private operators can apply for licences for online casino as of 1 March 2019 and for sports betting licences from 1 July 2019. Lottery and bingo remain reserved for the monopoly provider. Status: A new Gambling Law came into force on 1 March 2019. The Gambling Law allows private operators outside of Slovakia to apply for licences for sports betting and casino, although sports betting licences will not be operational until at least July 2020.SLOVENIA Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Online gambling must be operated by land-based casinos or lotteries and, as a result, only the monopoly holds online licences in Slovenia. Status: The requirement that only land-based Slovenian operators are eligible for licences is considered by certain industry stakeholders to be incompatible with EU law. Draft amendments to the Gaming Act were published in 2015, which aimed to remove the current local establishment requirement. However, the proposal does not appear to have been submitted to parliament to date.. Whether any proposed amendments will ultimately introduce an open licensing system remains unclear.SPAIN Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Private operators can apply for licences for all gambling products save for lottery. Status: Operators must hold a general licence and a specific licence, both issued by the National Gambling Commission, for each activity. Remote gambling licences are granted within specific application windows. The last tender process for applications closed on 18 December 2018. In April 2020, Spain’s government introduced restrictive measures on the offer of bonuses and advertising gambling for the duration of the country’s lockdown during the Covid-19 crisis. SWEDEN Regulated gambling products: Betting (including sports, horse race, pool, exchanges), casino, poker, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Licences are available for private operators. Status: As of 1 January 2019, Sweden is a fully regulated market. All gambling operators that wish to offer their services to Swedish residents will be required to obtain a licence in order to validly do so (either a ‘betting’ licence or a ‘commercial online games’ licence, depending on the product(s) being offered). Active enforcement measures are in place. Proposed regulation, which is set to be introduced on 1 June 2020 in response to the Covid-19 crisis, will introduce restrictions on, among other things, deposit and loss limits and total login time. The measures are expected to be in place until the end of 2020.Wiggin is a law firm dedicated to supporting the media, entertainment and gaming sectors. Its market-leading betting and gaming group provides specialist legal services to an array of gambling industry stakeholders. We advise many of the world’s leading gambling operators and suppliers and also enjoy helping entrepreneurial, interactive start-up businesses. If you’d like to hear more, contact us at [email protected] by Suzy Hazelwood from Pexels 6th May 2020 | By Stephen Carter Bingolast_img read more

I&M Holdings Limited (IM.ke) 2013 Annual Report

first_imgI&M Holdings Limited (IMH.ke) listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange under the Industrial holding sector has released it’s 2013 annual report.For more information about I&M Holdings Limited (IMH.ke) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the I&M Holdings Limited (IMH.ke) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: I&M Holdings Limited (IMH.ke)  2013 annual report.Company ProfileI&M Holdings Limited (I&M Bank Group) is a financial services institution providing products and services for the personal, commercial and corporate sectors in Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda, Uganda and Mauritius. Its product offering ranges from transactional accounts, home and car loans and overdraft and term loans to e-commerce payment and salary processing services, trade finance and insurance premium financing services I&M Bank Group also provides services for foreign exchange, fund transfers, tax payment, bancassurance and agency banking. Its investment management division offers securities accounts and fiduciary services and facilitates the purchase and sale of securities from the stock market and invests in government securities. Its asset finance division caters for personal and corporate clients and covers vehicle and machinery purchases and cash management services. Its head office is in Nairobi, Kenya. I&M Holdings Limitedlast_img read more

KenGen Limited (KEGN.ke) 2015 Abridged Report

first_imgKenGen Limited (KEGN.ke) listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange under the Energy sector has released it’s 2015 abridged results.For more information about KenGen Limited (KEGN.ke) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the KenGen Limited (KEGN.ke) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: KenGen Limited (KEGN.ke)  2015 abridged results.Company ProfileKenya Electricity Generating Company Limited (KenGen) generates and sells electricity in Kenya and for consumption in East Africa sub-regions. Electricity is generated through hydro, thermal, geothermal and wind power generation plants with a combined installed capacity in excess of 1 600 megawatts. KenGen was incorporated in 1954 under the Companies Act as Kenya Power Company (KPC) to construct the transmission line between Nairobi and Tororo in Uganda, as well as develop geothermal and other power generating facilities in the two countries. KPC sold electricity in bulk at cost to Kenya Power under a management contract. Following energy sectoral reforms in 1996, the management of KPC was separated from Kenya Power and a new enterprise was established called KenGen. The power utility owns 31 power-generating plants and operates in a liberalised power generation environment. Its head office is in Nairobi, Kenya. Kenya Electricity Generating Company Limited is listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchangelast_img read more

I think these small-cap stocks are the best buy-and-hold UK shares in a post-pandemic world

first_img Enter Your Email Address Image source: Getty Images. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. See all posts by Matthew Dumigan The high-calibre small-cap stock flying under the City’s radar Adventurous investors like you won’t want to miss out on what could be a truly astonishing opportunity…You see, over the past three years, this AIM-listed company has been quietly powering ahead… rewarding its shareholders with generous share price growth thanks to a carefully orchestrated ‘buy and build’ strategy.And with a first-class management team at the helm, a proven, well-executed business model, plus market-leading positions in high-margin, niche products… our analysts believe there’s still plenty more potential growth in the pipeline.Here’s your chance to discover exactly what has got our Motley Fool UK investment team all hot-under-the-collar about this tiny £350+ million enterprise… inside a specially prepared free investment report.But here’s the really exciting part… right now, we believe many UK investors have quite simply never heard of this company before! Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. I think these small-cap stocks are the best buy-and-hold UK shares in a post-pandemic world Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Matthew Dumigan | Sunday, 12th July, 2020 | More on: BOO GYM MARS The significant upside growth potential of investing in small-cap stocks is a huge advantage they have over their FTSE 100 blue-chip counterparts. Combine this with depressed share prices as a result of the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent stock market crash, and I think there’s a lucrative investment opportunity on the cards.As lockdown restrictions in the UK are gently eased, pubs, restaurants, and non-essential retailers are back open for business. Much of the impact remains to be seen, but the economy is showing early signs of a steady recovery. For investors chasing market-beating returns, I think these small-cap stocks are among the best UK shares to buy-and-hold over the coming years.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Best UK shares to buy and hold in a post-pandemic worldPerhaps unsurprisingly, The Gym Group’s (LSE: GYM) share price is down 52% since mid-February after plunging 75% in the depths of the sell-off. After all, the budget fitness provider lost around a fifth of its membership during the lockdown period as facilities closed across the nation. However, with indoor gyms given the go-ahead to re-open their doors from 25 July, things are beginning to look up.The group had been growing at an impressive rate prior to outbreak of Covid-19 thanks to the strength of its low-cost business model. Moreover, provided the company can recover a sufficient portion of its membership, the shares should continue to rise. For those able to stomach the additional risk, I reckon that on balance, the risk-reward picture is sufficiently attractive to justify a buy-and-hold purchase.Another company lifted by the easing of lockdown restrictions is Marston’s (LSE: MARS). Hit hard by the sell-off, the pub stock’s share price is still down by 62% in 2020. The company will inevitably face financial hardship over the coming months given its first-half profit fell by more than 70%.That said, Marston’s dominant market position and large customer base will be of immense help. As Brits make a swift return to local pubs and restaurants, Marston’s will be a huge beneficiary. I expect significant share price appreciation and healthy dividends in the years to come.A contrarian pickFinally, as a perhaps contrarian pick, I think Boohoo (LSE: BOO) could be a fantastic buy-and-hold investment. The company has stumbled upon difficult times recently regarding working conditions, and its share price has tanked as a result. However, the company has since pledged to raise standards. Hence, its brand may not be affected poorly over the long term.Boohoo’s popularity, especially among young people, should not be underestimated and the underlying business strategy is extremely effective. In fact, I think there’s plenty more room for the company to grow over the coming years. Consequently, I see the share price pullback as an opportunity to buy at a discount.Ultimately, each of these small-cap stocks boasts huge upside potential over the long term, in my eyes. As such, I reckon they justify their place among the best UK shares to buy and hold in a post-pandemic world. Looking for more top buys? Take a look at this small-cap stock with huge growth potential… Click here to claim your copy of this special investment report — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top Small-Cap Stock… free of charge! Matthew Dumigan has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended boohoo group, Marstons, and The Gym Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.last_img read more

As youth groups go virtual, support, faith, fun, and hints…

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth from St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church in Dallas, Texas, during a ski trip in Winter Park, Colorado, earlier this year before the coronavirus pandemic. The church’s youth group, like others, began meeting virtually in March. Photo courtesy of St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church[Episcopal News Service] In normal times, the Rev. Nate Huddleston doesn’t have to go out of his way to see the youth and families of St. Philip’s Cathedral in person. Huddleston, who is the Atlanta Episcopal cathedral’s priest associate for youth and young adult ministries, met with teens regularly, talking to them face to face and shaking hands with parents.These days, though, with strict coronavirus-related restrictions limiting human contact, Huddleston has a new ritual. About twice a week he gets into his car, drives to the homes of several families, parks in front of each house, and then calls the family. Huddleston stays in his car, at a safe distance, and “they come out to the front yard, we say ‘hey,’ I give them a blessing and go on,” he recently told Episcopal News Service.In Atlanta, Georgia, the Rev. Nate Huddleston has been conducting drive-by blessings during the pandemic. Here, seen from Huddleston’s car, is the Brown family (from left to right): Karen Brown, Caroline Brown, Scott Brown, Thomas Brown and Mariea Sibley. Eighth grader Caroline Brown is a confirmation student at the Cathedral of St. Philip, where Huddleston is a priest associate for youth and young adult ministries. Photo: Nate HuddlestonHuddleston calls it a drive-by blessing, and it’s one of several new tools that those in youth ministry have devised in recent weeks as youth groups — like so much else — have found life beyond their normal in-person context. Virtual scavenger hunts, room tours, and games help to maintain bonds.At Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Dallas, Texas, Director of Student Ministries Lauren Wainwright has launched a new weekly program. Tuesday nights, the church’s sixth through 12th graders “are looking at episodes of ‘The Good Place’ on Netflix and doing a Bible study using Zoom and Netflix [Party],” Wainwright explained via email.In Venice, Florida, youth at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church can take part in a daily photo challenge devised by Director of Youth and Family Ministries Jackie Overton. For Easter, other youth ministers delivered treats to youth group members. Some are emailing more with parents or beefing up their program’s social media presence. Huddleston has been texting prayers.Each is experimenting with staying connected and ministering to youth and families at a time when Zoom youth group is the norm. In March, when Episcopalians stopped gathering in person, youth groups quickly migrated to virtual spaces including Zoom, an online conferencing platform. These groups generally serve middle schoolers, high schoolers or a combination, and provide not only a time for Bible study or other faith formation but also a chance to hang out, play games, and share the week’s highs and lows.“St Columba’s EYC Zoom”: Youth from St. Columba’s Episcopal Church in Suwanee, Georgia, take part in a game night over Zoom. Screenshot: Sally UlreyZoom has become a home to Episcopal youth groups whose families have the necessary technology, internet connection and momentum to stay in touch during the pandemic. “Youth groups across The Episcopal Church [are] vastly different, depending upon funding, depending upon rural tendencies, as well as, literally, population,” said Bronwyn Clark Skov, The Episcopal Church’s officer for youth ministry. Whether by necessity or by choice, some youth groups have gone dormant, at least for now. The rest are living through an experiment in virtual faith formation and youth support.Digital-native tweens and teens have integrated Zoom into their lives with ease, even as some youth ministry staff have felt the stress of having technology mediate their leadership.“There are some learning curves, like how long a discussion will take online, and how it has to be facilitated a little more formally because of it being in the digital space,” Sally Ulrey, director or formation and youth ministry at St. Columba’s Episcopal Church in Suwanee, Georgia, said via email. They have forged ahead, though, tinkering with their normal schedules, dropping the Sunday school portion of their youth program, or moving meeting times to better accommodate teens’ new lifestyles and needs.Miriam McKenney, youth ministries coordinator at Calvary Episcopal Church in Cincinnati, Ohio, initially added a midweek check-in to the virtual program for her youth group of 10. But like others in her position, “I could tell that it was just one thing too many,” she said. “And so I’ve done more texting and individual conversations with them instead.”Meanwhile, the Diocese of Atlanta has seen consistent attendance at its new Guitars + Compline program, and the Cathedral of St. Philip, where Huddleston works, successfully migrated its Fellini’s Tuesday Night Bible Study from a local pizzeria to Zoom. In fact, the Bible study has drawn new attendees, as have other programs. In Cincinnati, McKenney hasn’t drawn a larger crowd, but her youth have become stalwart attendees. Typically, “church is competing with baseball practice, dance practice, all kinds of other things,” she said. “Now that everyone is home, everyone comes [to youth group].”Now, competition comes from the very tools allowing them to meet. Skov notes a general safety concern with online programming: “We don’t want to expose [youth] to solicitation or illegal content, and we want to make sure that we’re not giving adults who should not have access to young people access by our own clueless use of technology.” Despite concerning problems with the video conferencing platform, organizations and schools alike adopt safeguards and use it, or something similar, to bring youth together via their screens.When Jackie Overton, director of youth and family ministries at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Venice, Florida, delivered Easter baskets to her youth’s homes earlier this month, at one stop she found two teens visiting each other while maintaining social distance. Photo: Jackie Overton“We were about average with attendance until our school system figured out virtual schooling,” said Overton, in Venice, Florida. “Now some of my kids are ‘burnt out’ being on Zoom or connected digitally, as they have to be for a lot of their classes.”This remains on youth ministers’ minds, hand in hand with a widespread commitment to kids’ emotional well-being and connection with others. Faith formation, for now, is largely a boots-on-the-ground endeavor, as youth groups learn in real time the value and role of faith amidst potential despair.McKenney, who was tested for COVID-19 after returning from a trip to Spain in March (she tested negative), brought up illness and loss early in their virtual youth group sojourn. “I told them that very first day … you’re going to know people who get coronavirus, you’re going to know people who die from this,” she said. “These conversations, they can be had, and I believe they need to be had.”The youth ministry leaders who have been in touch with ENS said that job loss, illness and deaths from COVID-19 had, so far, spared their youth communities. Tiffany LaMotte, director of youth ministry at St. Michael and All Angels in Dallas, Texas, is waiting to help kids deal with those losses. “We will consult with our pastoral care team at the church and handle it on a case by case basis,” she said via email. “We will not be making one plan to handle everyone the same, we will do it as it happens.”But every youth group is already an epicenter of grief — young people are already living with fresh loss.“One thing I have consistently noticed throughout all of this is the sadness. You can see it in their eyes. Students who miss their friends, their schools, and even their teachers,” said Wainwright. Skov also acknowledged this reality. She noted that in a recent meeting, a diocesan youth minister said that a “youth minister [should function] more as a spiritual director right now in order to help young people to connect in ways that are meaningful for them,” she said, “…and to allow them the space to lament.” To that end, Ulrey offers a weekly devotional Scripture reflection, which she hopes will help her youth to frame the current reality and to cope.Youth ministers are also puzzling over how and when to honor graduating seniors and how to hold confirmations — will they postpone them, or offer them virtually? Upcoming pilgrimages and other summer events hang in the balance as well.For now, with at least 35 states’ schools closed until next fall at the earliest, youth ministers plan to keep programming available to teens. “Because schools are not looking to reopen soon, I think the consistency of youth group and the community that it provides is so important right now,” said Wainwright. It’s a unique nexus of emotional support, play and shared faith.At some point, pandemic-related restrictions will loosen, and Zoom youth groups won’t be the only option. When that happens, those working with youth don’t anticipate a return to the old status quo. “I do think … youth ministry will look different,” Huddleston said. “I think there will be a surge in participation, and that momentum may sustain, or it may not. I think some youth groups will continue to offer virtual spaces.” Ulrey agrees: “Some youth are, for whatever reason, more able or more comfortable joining virtually,” she said via email. “There are lots of questions … around what can digital membership/engagement look like? Can you be a virtual member of a youth group and what would that look like? What does that mean for discipleship?”Until then, Ulrey will continue to meet virtually with the youth cohort she described as resilient, a word other youth ministers used, too. “They show up for themselves, and they show up for others,” she said. “They haven’t given up on doing that, on trying to be present. They haven’t quit.”– Heather Beasley Doyle is a freelance journalist, writer and editor based in Massachusetts. She has previously written about education and racial reconciliation for Episcopal News Service. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth & Young Adults Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET COVID-19, Featured Events Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT center_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET By Heather Beasley DoylePosted Apr 27, 2020 Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET As youth groups go virtual, support, faith, fun, and hints at lasting change Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Servicelast_img read more

Online lookout

If major donors are using the Internet to inform their charitable giving, that is a reason not only for charities to create a Web site, but to develop a site that addresses such audiences and meets their expectations. If such donors jump from their financial information sites to a charity’s site, will there be a significant drop in the quality and relevance of information presented? AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 20 June 1999 | News  23 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Online lookout About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Stephen Lee reports on his experiences at the recent NSFRE conference in Miami in this month’s Professional Fundraising magazine. Focusing on “the new wealthy”, he shares the findings of a survey by the Community Foundation into 750 businessmen – “and they are mainly men”, notes Lee – in Silicon Valley with personal wealth over $1 million, not including their home.Stephen Lee reports on his experiences at the recent NSFRE conference in Miami in this month’s Professional Fundraising magazine. Focusing on “the new wealthy”, he shares the findings of a survey by the Community Foundation into 750 businessmen – “and they are mainly men”, notes Lee – in Silicon Valley with personal wealth over $1 million, not including their home.These people focus on a few charities and give large sums when they believe it will have a major impact. Not only are they not interested in “traditional voluntary roles” but “they use the internet as a primary source of information.” Advertisement read more

Several charity Web and ASP services “cease operations”

Advertisement About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. The NonprofitMatrix reports that several charity sector portal and Application Service Providers have ceased operations recently. These include Shine.com, Remit.net, iReachOut, ClickforaCause and onGiving. Visit NonprofitMatrix.com. Several charity Web and ASP services “cease operations” Howard Lake | 16 December 2000 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  16 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis read more

Voluntary sector worth £66bn in 2000, up 12%

first_img The voluntary sector is now worth £66bn, according to a new book.The voluntary sector is now worth £66bn, according to a new bookThe voluntary sector is now worth £66bn, according to figures for 2000 published in the new edition of the Dresdner RCM Top 3000 Charities Guide. This is an increase of 12% on the previous year. Advertisement About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Voluntary sector worth £66bn in 2000, up 12% AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  13 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 17 May 2001 | News Total voluntary income reached £3.7bn. The NSPCC increased its voluntary income by more than half, from £34m to £53m. The RNLI was the most successful legacy fundraising charity, generating £57 in legacy income.last_img read more

Sunday Times Rich List 2017 analysed

first_img The Sunday Times Rich List 2017 has been analysed by regional, gender, industry, age and more. Here is our round-up of some of this analysis for those with an interest in prospect research.The Sunday Times Rich List for 2017 has been published today in a 160-page magazine, including two pages for The Giving List revealing those who had donated the most to charities and good causes. While the content is available in today’s printed Sunday Times (£2.50, or £2 to subscribers) or behind a paywall, its data has been explored and analysed by many free-to-access news sites.You can view the top 200 Giving List donors from CAF (PDF). Howard Lake | 7 May 2017 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  214 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis29 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis29 Tagged with: Prospect research Research / statistics rich list  213 total views,  1 views today Advertisement Sunday Times Rich List 2017 analysed Find out more about the 2017 Giving List to see which of the wealthiest people in the UK gave the most to charities and good causes.last_img read more